Current Projects

Spring 2019 Projects

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Legend: 1 = Primary Discipline | 2 = Secondary Discipline | 3 = Optional Discipline(s)

Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Actuated Medical, Inc. Additive Manufacturing of Customized Medical Components. Medina, Scott 1 0 0 0 2 0 3 3 3 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

AMI is working with children’s hospitals to develop and tests the feasibility of 3D Printing-based production of customized ventilation masks tailor-made for individual neonatal and pediatric patients. These devices can include challenging facial structures like a cleft lip. The team includes experts in neonatology, airway management, respiratory care and simulation. In addition, the hospital partner has experience developing high-fidelity, patient-specific anatomic models using 3D printing technology. Airway and hemodynamic models have been developed from existing Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CT/MRI) studies for improved procedural planning and for validating different medical device prototypes. The main challenge is 3D printing of polymers in a system that can pass V&V, along with Biocompatibility.

A student team at the Learning Factory will work with AMI staff and hospital partners to
1) Take scan data from a patient and select the relevant information to print. Software exists to take a Catscan or other information and convert it to an STL file for printing. The problem is selecting when data points are relevant and critical to the printing job for something like a mask (you don’t want to print the whole face), and minimizing file size. The student team will help automate and simplify this process
2) Student team will interact with AMI to learn about manufacturing in an ISO and FDA certified environment, including how the FDA is dealing with the potential and challenges of 3D printing devices for patients
3) Team will develop the mechanical aspects and design of printing (of a mold) and then casting into the mold (either with low pressure, or with more advanced injection molding equipment) using proven silicones or urethanes
4) Develop initial trials on directly 3D printing a non-invasive ventilation mask, including challenges with biocompatibility, transparency, flexibility and printability (no current solutions in 3D printing address all of these)
5) Evaluate market potential and business case for 3D printing patient-specific devices (hospitals will pay $3 for a mask now. If a better one costs $15, will they buy it?)
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Alternative Energy Development Group (AEDG) 1 Designing an Educational Observation Deck to overlook the Penn State Orchard Rd. 2MW Solar Array - Team 1 Eser, Semih 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

In December 2018, Penn State University completed construction of a 2 MW DC solar array on the south facing hillside of Orchard Rd. One of the initial agreements between AEDG and Penn State was to incorporate an educational aspect to the solar array. This began with giving Dr. Jefferey Brownson access to one of the 30 inverters to run various testing. AEDG would like to continue this partnership through the sponsorship of a Capstone Project. The Capstone Project would involve designing an observation deck to overlook the Orchard Rd. solar array. This observation deck would both provide a space for students and alumni to learn about the array itself, see real time statistics on the production of the array, and learn more about all of the other research that pertains to the array. Students should seek to incorporate existing Penn State research concerning solar. Ideally, students would end the semester with a small model depicting what the finished structure would look like, what data displays it would include, and plans that a qualified construction team could use to fully develop the project.

Eventually, this observation area could be utilized by students for research and available to the public on football weekends. By partnering with the University, AEDG hopes to sponsor the plans for the creation of a structure that can be enjoyed by students and alumni alike for years to come.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Alternative Energy Development Group (AEDG) 2 Designing an Educational Observation Deck to overlook the Penn State Orchard Rd. 2MW Solar Array - Team 2 Eser, Semih 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

In December 2018, Penn State University completed construction of a 2 MW DC solar array on the south facing hillside of Orchard Rd. One of the initial agreements between AEDG and Penn State was to incorporate an educational aspect to the solar array. This began with giving Dr. Jefferey Brownson access to one of the 30 inverters to run various testing. AEDG would like to continue this partnership through the sponsorship of a Capstone Project. The Capstone Project would involve designing an observation deck to overlook the Orchard Rd. solar array. This observation deck would both provide a space for students and alumni to learn about the array itself, see real time statistics on the production of the array, and learn more about all of the other research that pertains to the array. Students should seek to incorporate existing Penn State research concerning solar. Ideally, students would end the semester with a small model depicting what the finished structure would look like, what data displays it would include, and plans that a qualified construction team could use to fully develop the project.

Eventually, this observation area could be utilized by students for research and available to the public on football weekends. By partnering with the University, AEDG hopes to sponsor the plans for the creation of a structure that can be enjoyed by students and alumni alike for years to come.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
B. Braun Medical Inc. Detecting an IV Catheter in a Vein Medina, Scott 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

B. Braun Medical is a leader in IV therapy. In most cases an IV Catheter is placed in a vein to deliver IV fluids. It is critical that the catheter is placed in a vein. There are existing technologies such as X-ray and ultrasound to locate an IV catheter. The objective of this project is to research what other technologies could be used, or improve existing technologies with alternate materials/geometries. Generate a few concepts. And perform a proof of principle on the leading concept.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Bechtel Plant Machinery, Inc. Emergency Cooling Door Erdman, Mike 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

This system will include a door that physically opens through both
electromechanical and purely mechanical means to prevent the
electronics from overheating.

Project Goals are to 1) Design a full scale system that allows an electrical equipment
cabinet to continue to function if the primary cooling system fails, 2) Build a scaled prototype to demonstrate an effective design, 3) Verify functionality through analysis and testing and 4) Interpret detailed requirements and communicate professionally
with customer.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Brentwood Industries, Inc. Process Improvement for Solvent Welding Cannon, Dave 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Based in Reading, PA, Brentwood Industries is the largest independent supplier of cooling tower fills and drift eliminators in the world. Brentwood currently uses a proprietary solvent bonding process to chemically weld sheets of PVC plastic together. This current process requires a large labor force to assemble packs - a process that requires insertion of unassembled sheets into a solvent delivery system, stacking the sheets into a curing rig, removal of partially cured packs from the curing rig, as needed repair of less than ideal bonding, and stacking of assembled packs onto pallets. The large labor force and the less than ideal dirty and fume-laden environment that this process requires is a limiting factor in production throughput. The main focus of this project will be overall labor reduction on the solvent lines, and the aim of this project will be to develop multiple ideas to limit the staffed labor needed for these lines.

Deliverables:
1. A total labor reduction of 60%.
2. 3 different process improvement plans.
3. Full business model for all 3 processes.
4. Full SolidWorks model and Drawings for the top recommended process.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Bridge Gap Engineering, LLC 1 Recycling of Hot Gas for Kiln Burner Combustion Air - Team 1 Eser, Semih 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Project Description
In the cement manufacturing process the raw materials are burned inside of a kiln to produce clinker. This process takes place at extreme temperatures of over 2000°F and requires a significant amount of fuel which is directly correlated to the kiln production. For a cement producer, energy costs related to fuel and electricity are among the biggest expenses in the cement making process, and often make up approximately 50% of the annual operating cost of the facility. Improvements in these areas have quick payback periods and long term benefits of reduced energy usage. The kiln burner is often the primary source of heat to the process, can use a variety of fuels and provides the heat to the raw materials within the kiln to produce clinker. For most fuels fired, some amount of cold air, referred to as “primary air” is injected as a means of providing flame shaping capabilities and improving combustion characteristics, although a large amount of heat is wasted in combustion at the burner by heating the primary air from ambient temperature.
The project is to recycle excess air from the product cooling process, which is already heated, for use in the kiln burner. By introducing high temperature air into the burner as primary air there is less of a temperature differential to overcome versus ambient, which will result in a reduction in fuel consumption. This solution does not come without some significant design considerations and challenges such as:
• Process air is dust laden and will cause excessive wear on the primary air fan
• Traditional dust collector bags have a low temperature limit. New technology using ceramic filters would be required.
• Primary air is used as cooling air for the burner pipe internals. Raising the temperature will affect burner design.
• Higher temperature combustion may lead to an increase in emissions of volatile pollutants

Project Deliverables
• Determine optimum air temperature for use in the system considering equipment limitations.
• Determine fuel savings associated with increased primary air temperature.
• Determine equipment types (fan, dust collector, etc.) to be used which will allow for reliable operation at higher air temperatures.
• Determine necessary modifications to burner pipe and refractory design to account for higher thermal expansion.
• Determine equipment sizing for a “test case” to evaluate baseline project cost.
• Determine typical payback period for upgrade based on reduction in fuel consumption.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Bridge Gap Engineering, LLC 2 Recycling of Hot Gas for Kiln Burner Combustion Air - Team 2 Eser, Semih 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Project Description

In the cement manufacturing process the raw materials are burned inside of a kiln to produce clinker. This process takes place at extreme temperatures of over 2000°F and requires a significant amount of fuel which is directly correlated to the kiln production. For a cement producer, energy costs related to fuel and electricity are among the biggest expenses in the cement making process, and often make up approximately 50% of the annual operating cost of the facility. Improvements in these areas have quick payback periods and long term benefits of reduced energy usage. The kiln burner is often the primary source of heat to the process, can use a variety of fuels and provides the heat to the raw materials within the kiln to produce clinker. For most fuels fired, some amount of cold air, referred to as “primary air” is injected as a means of providing flame shaping capabilities and improving combustion characteristics, although a large amount of heat is wasted in combustion at the burner by heating the primary air from ambient temperature. The project is to recycle excess air from the product cooling process, which is already heated, for use in the kiln burner. By introducing high temperature air into the burner as primary air there is less of a temperature differential to overcome versus ambient, which will result in a reduction in fuel consumption. This solution does not come without some significant design considerations and challenges such as:

• Process air is dust laden and will cause excessive wear on the primary air fan
• Traditional dust collector bags have a low temperature limit. New technology using ceramic filters would be required.
• Primary air is used as cooling air for the burner pipe internals. Raising the temperature will affect burner design.
• Higher temperature combustion may lead to an increase in emissions of volatile pollutants

Project Deliverables

• Determine optimum air temperature for use in the system considering equipment limitations.
• Determine fuel savings associated with increased primary air temperature.
• Determine equipment types (fan, dust collector, etc.) to be used which will allow for reliable operation at higher air temperatures.
• Determine necessary modifications to burner pipe and refractory design to account for higher thermal expansion.
• Determine equipment sizing for a “test case” to evaluate baseline project cost.
• Determine typical payback period for upgrade based on reduction in fuel consumption.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Capital One Money Management Shaffer, Steven 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Capital One focuses on leveraging new technology to create helpful tools for our customers. As a financial services corporation, we continue to focus on our customers and how we can improve their lives financially. A huge problem that people have with finances is dealing with how and when to spend their money, and what to spend their money on. This is because people often do not understand how their spending today affects them in the future.

We want you to solve this problem by creating a financial management service for our customers. We challenge you to create a full stack web application that tracks an individual’s expenses, budgets how they should use their money, and predicts how it will affect them in the near and long-term future.

The team will leverage Machine Learning technology to predict behavior. We would like the team to present the Money Management tool in a customer-friendly way powered by APIs. We’ll utilize the first meeting to provide requirements, mock-up UI designs, discuss database structures, etc.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Central PA SCI Group Modification of Playstation for Young Man with Brachial Plexus Injury Wheeler, Timothy 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Overview:
Expand the preliminary design for a modified Playstation console that was created by a team of engineering students based on the input from a young man with the use of only one hand. Solve the interface challenge and devise a means to wire the console so that all functions of the conventional Playstation are mapped onto it.

Deliverables:
A fully working modified Playstation console.

Last semester's final report (December 2018) will be made available to the new team. Several of the Fall semester team members are still attending Penn State and have offered to make themselves available for any questions.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Deere & Company Low Cost Self-Centering Spring Damper Control Improvement Ray, Asok 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

A self-centering spring damper motion control device is currently used on mechanical hydrostatic transmission designs to modulate the system response and dampen environmental feedback to achieve peak levels of system response and optimal operator comfort. The current self-centering spring damper is comprised of an external steel tube that captures subsystem components including a common oil motion damper, with two opposed centering springs. One end of the assembly contains an eccentric that is used to compensate for system tolerance stack up and set a neutral position.

When an external force is applied, the self-centering spring damper opposes the force in accordance with the static linear compression of one of the centering springs and a dynamic force from the oil damper that varies with the rate of change of linear position. When the external force is removed, the self-centering spring damper will drive the system to a centered equilibrium position of the centering springs with the rate of motion controlled by the dynamic force from the oil damper.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Discovery Space of Central PA Schlieren Science Center Exhibit Wheeler, Timothy 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Discovery Space is a hands-on science center located a few blocks from Penn State's University Park campus. Each year, more than 30,000 people walk through the doors to experience scientific phenomena and engineering challenges in our exhibit floor. We currently have a Schlieren imaging exhibit that needs to be redesigned in order to work more reliably with our visitors.

The deliverables include a working, new, safe exhibit (potentially using some of our current parts) that fits our branding, professional signage that describes the phenomena in a way that a middle schooler could understand, a training document for volunteers to learn how to use the exhibit including talking points for them to use with visitors, a troubleshooting guide and a catalog of parts and part numbers in the event that any need to be replaced. The exhibit must be tested with our visitors at least 3 weeks prior to the end of the semester in order to allow time for any necessary adaptations.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
E x H, Inc. Design, Prototype & Verify a Metasurface-based RF Antenna Wheeler, Timothy 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Proposal:
Are you interested in cutting-edge RF (radio frequency) technology, antennas, and communication systems? E x H Inc. provides a suite of advanced electromagnetic system design tools with a focus on applications of advanced materials and optimization-based design techniques. With a set of such tools, we would like to work with a team of bright undergraduate engineers to develop a physical application of some of the advanced antenna and electromagnetic system designs our software is capable of generating. We are interested in exploring useful and innovative designs such as miniaturized (likely flat) antenna arrays.

Objectives:
- Produce a physical RF design and subsequent prototype demonstrating meta-surface based antenna/EM-system technology.
- Improve our software suite’s interface and solving capabilities through knowledge gained via the collaboration
Motivation:
- Provide real-life experience to an undergraduate engineering/computer science team.
- Build and test the reference design and compare simulation vs prototype test data collection.
Let Yourself Imagine The Near Future:
- See the following three pages of images of a wirelessly connected world of high speed satellite transmission and 5G ground stations and end user terminals, enabled by the type of metasurface-enable antenna you will design and prototype
- Figure 1 – Satellites enable mobile communication with air, sea and land terminals
- Figure 2 – Satellites both relay data and transmit to ground stations where 5G terminals distribute the signal to end users
- Figure 3 – Speed, bandwidth, beam steering and multi-band terminals can be enabled by using metasurfaces, designed using our PFSS software
- You’ll be able to see how the miracle of metasurfaces, engineered structures not found in nature, can enable a high bandwidth interconnected world!
Deliverables:
- A completed design of an antenna/EM-system with mounting system.
- Actual constructed prototype (likely through 3D printing) and testing datasets.
Proposed Team Composition:
- Electrical Engineers (2-3): Coordination of the project as well as the design of the antenna/EM-system itself. This would be in conjunction with the other team members for coordination of the appropriate material choices and manufacturing methods. It is highly recommended that someone has some familiarity with Electromagnetic theory and/or Antenna theory. Knowledge of wireless communication systems may also be helpful.
- Computer Scientist (1-2): Tasked with collaboration with the software development team at E x H to assist in customizing our software for the purposes of the project. This will involve substantial communication with the rest of the team to understand how the modeling and optimization algorithms may be modified to assist with the design.
- Mechanical Engineer (1): Tasked with material selection, design of the support system for the prototype, CAD drawings, and manufacture of the prototype.
Additional Resources Required:
- 3D printing facilities for RF meta-surface prototype and RF anechoic chamber use for testing
Contact Information:
Name: Garret McGraw
Email: gem@exhengineering.com
Office Phone Number: 814-826-4500
Office Address: 200 Innovation Blvd, Suite 205, State College, PA, 16803
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Eternal Remembrance, LLC Eternal Remembrance Native Mobile APP Shaffer, Steven 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Eternal Remembrance has a patent pending idea to strive to enhance the way we remember a loved one through technology. Online content sharing will allow for family, friends, and acquaintances to make memories of a loved one last forever, even after the person has passed.

Customers will be able to purchase an emblem or receive it as a gift to mount on their loved one’s memorial. Through the mobile application or website, customers then use a unique ID to set up a profile page for their loved one, set administrator rights, and adjust privacy settings.

After the page is set up, customers can then use their mobile GPS or online map to record the location of the emblem. Once the link is shared online through social media or word-of-mouth, visitors will be able to access the unique profile page to upload photos and videos, comment, share stories, and send messages to the family.

Eternal Remembrance would like to design and then develop the Eternal Remembrance mobile and web application that will allow for users to manage, view, and share content with others mobile application supported by an already existing database, server, back end infrastructure.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Exelon Generation Company, LLC Passive Generator Stator Cooling Song, Chunshan 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 3 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

The Passive Generator Stator Cooling (PGSC) project is to develop a practicable, feasible and viable concept as solution to generator stator cooling which improves equipment reliability and prevents reactor scrams from a loss of stator cooling.

PGSC will be developed in partnership between Design Engineering at Three-Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station (TMI) and Penn State Learning Factory (LF) College of Engineering. TMI Engineering will provide drawings to PSU as requested. PSU students will be provided opportunities to walkdown systems at TMI to see existing configuration. Options and suggestions may be provided to PSU from TMI in an effort to ensure a practical concept.

PSGC will:
-Remove the heat load (plus margin) from existing stator bars in a turbine generator during all seasons.
-Be economical to construct.
-Eliminate or significantly reduce current reliability risk in stator cooling.
--No chemistry control needed
--No pumps
--Fewest components as is practicable
-Avoid, to the maximum extent practicable, impact to existing plant systems
-Minimize impact to existing systems, should that be necessary (i.e., PGSC should not reduce reliability margin of any other system nor create additional major modifications).
-Modifications in the plant that are required will exclude major modifications to the generator stator itself (e.g., stator bars cannot be modified but the piping interfaces can be).
-Solution is a concept which can reasonably demonstrate principles or elements of technology.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Factory LLC Honey Stingers Packaging Life Cycle Optimization Kimel, Allen 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Honey Stingers chews are used by endurance athletes of all types for fuel before, during and after strenuous exercise. Products are typically eaten on the go during exercise/ training sessions. Our research has highlighted opportunities to enhance the consumer experience and reduce our ecological footprint by improving the packaging utility and sustainability of our product.

The goal of the project is to provide a commercially viable packaging solution that grows the brand by solving for the consumer needs in terms of ease of use (on the go consumption for high-performance athletes) and responsible disposal (reduction of environmental impact).

Project Deliverables:

Research, evaluate, validate, and recommend the packaging materials, manufacturing methods, sourcing requirements, and supply chain solutions needed to bring this new packaging design to market within 24 months of project submission.

Solution must:

- Maintain or enhance existing product requirements inclusive of product freshness and flavor components throughout the shelf life of the product
- Maintain or enhance brand identity/essence
- Maintain or enhance current profit margins
- Reduce overall environmental impact
- Include validated cost and timing estimates
- Include sketches, mock-ups, and working prototypes
- Include consumer validated data to on how the proposed solution works in each focus area of usage and environmental impact
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
FedEx Services Android based location API Shaffer, Steven 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

FedEx would like to sponsor a group of students to continue the work of teams from the last two semester. The goal of the project is to use Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons to provide precise location of Android based wearable scanning devices within a facility. The team will take over the code created last semester. The team will finalize the location service. The team will then develop a location API running on a FedEx scanner. That API could be called by production applications for location specific information that can be passed to the user. For example if the user is performing a scanning operation checking for miss-loaded packages the location service will provide the user with which dock door they are at and what the trailer number is at that dock door.
To help the team understand the business problem being solved they will need to travel to a local FedEx hub for a tour and operations overview. If the team progresses a stretch goal will be made for the team to test their solution at a local FedEx facility. The stretch goal would require the team to complete testing at the FedEx facility near Pittsburgh or Altoona.
The team will be provided with all the materials from last semester’s team. The team will also be provided with BLE beacons and an Android based scanning device.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Felmlee Lures Felmlee Lures 3D Printed Packaging McComb, Chris 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 3 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

We are Felmlee Lures, LLC, located in Lewistown, PA and this company has been around making quality lures in the USA since 1954. Michael Flanagan recently purchased the company in March 2018, his goal was to revamp the brand, which included new up-to-date packaging, logos and online presence. In order to sell in many markets, packaging is crucial and the product must be front and center, and entirely visible. We have the bags, now we are looking for a plastic "clamshell" insert to hold the lures in place. We have tried several variations from numerous companies and we now realize that 3D printing may be the way to go. Essentially we are looking to print molds of our lures so we can then use a Thermoforming machine to print the actual "blisters" or "clamshells". We hope this is something that we can work together on and can't wait to see the results.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Flowserve Corporation Optimized Journal Bearing Design Utilizing Additive Manufacturing Ray, Asok 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Flowserve is a world leading pump manufacturer that is continuously seeking new ways to improve the products we provide to our customers and remain competitive in a very aggressive market. Most recently, the Flowserve Pump Division R&D team is interested in investigating additively manufactured journal bearings for between-bearing pumps. Bearings are one of the most important components in a pump and bearing failure can often result in catastrophic failure of the shaft and other integral pump components. The current industry norm Babbitt-lined steel bearings are limited by the operating temperature of the Babbitt material and can result in bearing failure when those limits are reached.

Flowserve is interested in pursuing an additively manufactured journal bearing for use in a between bearing pump. The part/assembly will be designed to the specifications provided by Flowserve. Flowserve will test the prototype in a bearing test setup at the Bethlehem site and the student team will be invited to observe and assist in the testing process. The student team should focus on answering the following questions when approaching the bearing redesign process:

o What 3D printable materials are available and appropriate for the bearing application (consider stiffness, lubricity, compatibility with various fluids, etc.)?

o What is/are the optimal oil ring(s) location(s) for bearing lubrication?

o How effective would implementing cooling pathways be? Is it possible to use the working fluid to help cool the bearing?

o How does the bearing interact with the bearing housing (stresses, loads, etc)?


Throughout this project students will need to exercise their engineering judgment and intuition as they investigate this technology. The students will present their study, redesign, results, and conclusions to Flowserve.

Project deliverables:

o Finite Element Analysis of CAD model to assess feasibility of the redesign

o Additively manufactured bearing assembly prototype

o Bearing test results and comparison to the current steel bearing
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Ford Motor Company 1 Driver Action Image Classification Using Machine Learning Shaffer, Steven 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Ford Motor Company is constantly looking for new ways to learn about our customers in order to better meet their needs. The most common means of collecting this information is via surveys, customer feedback, and market research, but this self-reported feedback is not always representative of the actual customer needs and behaviors. Because of this, we have engaged in a naturalistic study to observe how people actually interact with their vehicle’s interior while driving.

We have collected nearly one million images of study participants driving their vehicles and manually recorded the actions of the study participants in 14,000 of those images. Some examples of what we can gather from this information are how often armrests are used, how often drivers interact with their dashboard, and how often drivers interact with their phones, bags, and other items while driving.

We want you to complete the next steps by gathering this same information for the rest of the images to complete the data set. This will be done by developing a machine learning model from the images that have already been analyzed, verifying the accuracy of this model, and then applying this model to the rest of the images to describe their contents.

Additional tasks that you may complete in this project include: Analyzing the outputs of your model to gain new insights into how people interact with their vehicles, using customer’s interactions with different parts of the vehicle to classify the most common driving postures, studying where customers store objects in their cars, and generating a searchable database that can be used to answer questions about how often certain behaviors occur, investigating how this research could be applied to improve customer experiences as we enter the age of autonomous vehicles.

This project requires knowledge of Machine Learning.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Ford Motor Company 2 Driver Image Classification Using Machine Learning Shaffer, Steven 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Ford Motor Company is constantly looking for new ways to learn about our customers in order to better meet their needs. The most common means of collecting this information is via surveys, customer feedback, and market research, but this self-reported feedback is not always representative of the actual customer needs and behaviors. Because of this, we have engaged in a naturalistic study to observe how people actually interact with their vehicle’s interior while driving.

We have collected nearly one million images of study participants driving their vehicles and manually recorded the actions of the study participants 14,000 of those images. Some examples of what we can gather from this information are how often armrests are used, how often drivers interact with their dashboard, and how often drivers interact with their phones, bags, and other items while driving.
We want you to complete the next steps by gathering this same information for the rest of the images to complete the data set. This will be done by developing a machine learning model from the images that have already been analyzed, verifying the accuracy of this model, and then applying this model to the rest of the images to describe their contents.

Additional tasks that you may complete in this project include: Analyzing the outputs of your model to gain new insights into how people interact with their vehicles, using customer’s interactions with different parts of the vehicle to classify the most common driving postures, studying where customers store objects in their cars, and generating a searchable database that can be used to answer questions about how often certain behaviors occur, investigating how this research could be applied to improve customer experiences as we enter the age of autonomous vehicles.

This project requires knowledge of Machine Learning.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Ford Motor Company 3 Comfort Accessory Development: Therapeutic Foot and Neck Pillow Design and Optimization Szczesny, Spencer 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Team will be challenged to benchmark current offerings on the market, discover and integrate new technologies that will be further discussed, test prototype designs, and optimize designs with customer research and seat bucks to show positive impact to the customer experience in a vehicle.
Goals of the project will be to design, prototype, test, optimize and deliver a product that a supplier could quote for production. This process will include a benchmark session, objective testing, multiple design characterization and optimizations, customer research, and a presentation to Ford seat engineering management team of project state. More details will be discussed at team kick-off of technology options to integrate.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
General Motors 1 OPC interface to GM Enterprise Application For IIoT Sensors Shaffer, Steven 0 0 3 1 0 3 0 2 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Objective:
General Motors utilized enterprise software, CIMPLICITY, to communicate with plant floor devices, extracting machine data sets for several manufacturing software applications. The Powertrain Production Monitoring and Controls (PT-PM&C) application collects these machine data sets, providing a user interface and reporting. Some key functional highlights of this application include production monitoring, Throughput and bottleneck analysis, tool life reporting, and Process variable monitoring. The objective of this project is to develop an script, in Visual Basic for Applications, that integrates into General Motors CIMPLICITY framework. Specifically, the script will communicate, via OPC, to IoT sensors located in our Flint Engine plant, and collect process data from them. This process data will then be passed to the existing process variable framework within PT-PM&C.

What is needed from GM:
- Facilitate Flint Engine plant visit for Penn State University project team
- Sample log data from KCF sensors deployed at Flint Michigan
- Documentation on sensors, and technical support contact information regarding OPC interface specifics
- Documentation on PT-PM&C Process Variable interface

Expected Output:
- VBA Script for use with Cimplicity software
- Script to open OPC connection with sensor(s), extract data sample, and provide data to Process Variable interface in PT-PM&C
- Script should integrate with existing process variable framework within PT-PM&C, and mimic existing PLC communication interface, and communicate with sensor directly via OPC
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
General Motors 2 Enterprise Database Dashboard for Manufacturing Equipment Data Validation Performance Shaffer, Steven 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Objective:
The General Motors IT Launch organization provides installation, deployment and configuration services for manufacturing plant floor applications used by our Global Propulsions Systems, Stamping, and Vehicle assembly plants. Another important role of the IT Launch team is to validate that data sets produced by our manufacturing equipment are compliant with specifications. GM IT utilizes a Data Validation Tool to analyze log files representative of machine states and operations. This validation software applies a rule set to the log files and provides feedback to the user. The DVT also outputs summary data performance logs associated with manufacturing equipment being validated. The objective of this project is to create a reporting dashboard on data performance logs, using C# as the code case, presented in a Web User Interface.

What is needed from GM:
- Data Validation tool data set test files to PSU students
- Database Schema of existing structure to be integrated with
- Sample dashboard of expected project output

Expected Output:
- Ingest and log DVT data set test results to SQL database
--Log individual signals and their status (Pass/Fail)
--Log exception strings for failed data set signals
- SQL data to web dashboard
--Signal status summary %
--Drill-down of summarized (count) of DVT exceptions explaining summary %
- All source code and databases at project conclusion
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Graymont (PA) Inc. Lime Plant Operations Efficiency Optimization Purdum, Charlie 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

This lime plant is a large scale industrial facility where limestone is mined, crushed, screened, sorted by size and chemistry using online xray technology, blended into kilns for thermal processing, sampled, analyzed for quality assurance according to customer specifications and routed into different silos accordingly. Further processing for finished product sizing and loading into customer trucks or trains is done. Additionally the lime is transferred to in-house bagging facility for robotic bagging, palletizing and customer pick up. Additional co-processing plants inside the lime plant exist to produce specialty products such as hydrated lime and pulverized limestone products. To accomplish this there is many large machines and automated equipment, however, there is also many humans operating equipment through HMI computers, inspecting equipment in the field, operating heavy equipment and various other piece of mobile equipment, cleaning, lubricating, loading customers, etc. This is a 24/7/365 operation which has undergone significant expansion in the past 20 years. In light of changing technology, automation and the ever increasing global market pressures placed on American manufacturing, the target of this project is to have a detailed analysis of the tasks and organizational structure of how operations are conducted to identify opportunities to increase efficiency to assure the manufacturing is on the cutting edge of technology to maintain a competitive advantage in the market.
This facility is regulated by the Federal Mine Safety and Health Administration. To work on this project you will be required to complete Safety Training and wear PPE (hard hat, safety glasses, high viz vest, safety toe shoes). You will be subject to all Company Policies while onsite including random drug and alcohol testing.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Guidedwave Wireless Ultrasonic Acquisition System with Cloud Interface Erdman, Mike 0 0 0 3 0 2 1 0 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Recent advancements in ultrasonic sensors has allowed for the development of cost effective sensors that can acquire structural integrity data for hundreds of feet from a single location. These sensors can be permanently mounted to pipelines to monitor structural integrity. In order to realize the full potential of these sensors, a battery powered pulser receiver system with cloud storage is needed. This project seeks to prove the fundamental concept is possible and lay the groundwork for what could become a commercial product. The team will develop a battery powered single channel ultrasonic pulser/receiver circuit that is capable of developing up to a 100V 6 cycle 32kHz pulse into a provided magnetostrictive sensor. The system will then receive ultrasonic data, process data, and wirelessly transmit data to a cloud system that is accessible through a phone application. The electronic components will be packaged into a custom 3D printed enclosure that attaches to the sensor or the pipe.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Harley-Davidson Inc. Conservation and utilization of waste heat from the paint cure ovens Song, Chunshan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

The paint cure process utilizes 5 ovens rated at 3 million Btu each. The waste heat from the ovens permeates out onto the shop floor placing an added load on the HVAC to maintain comfort cooling during warm weather days. During the winter months the waste heat could be used for comfort heating, but is not.

The objective is to find way(s) to better utilize the waste heat to aid comfort heating during the winter months and redirect or extract the waste heat during the summer months to reduce the load of the HVAC system.

The ultimate goal is to achieve greater energy savings throughout the year without disturbing the paint cure process.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
High Concrete Group LLC Create an autonomous facility inspection process utilizing manned and unmanned data gathering technology McComb, Chris 0 0 1 2 0 0 3 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Description: Create an autonomous facility inspection process utilizing drones, robotics, camera-mounted vehicles, and other similar manned and unmanned data gathering technology and develop an AI based, preliminary assessment and cataloging process to organize and filter observed data against a database for engineering use.

The StructureCare division of High Concrete Group LLC provides condition assessment inspection services for parking structures, identifying developing conditions of wear and deterioration and providing maintenance and repair solutions to owners. Currently a field engineer performs a detailed condition inspection of the structure documenting and mapping areas of wear and deterioration by obtaining photos and creating marked drawings. Tools used during this inspection currently include an android tablet loaded with a PDF copy of the garage floor plans, acoustic sounding of concrete surfaces, and limited diagnostic testing. A visual inspection is completed of all floor level, vertical, and overhead surfaces. Observed conditions could include cracks, spalls, water leakage, displacement, unusual movement, worn coatings and pavement markings, deteriorating waterproofing, metal corrosion, and deteriorating bearing conditions. Acoustic testing is performed by sounding of the concrete surface with a hammer or dragging a chain to identify changes in sound signifying unsound or delaminated concrete. Load testing, driving over floor members while looking for movements between concrete joints, is performed to identify potential underlying connection failures. Chloride-ion testing is performed by collecting concrete powder samples in various locations. The presence of elevated chloride levels is usually associated with a corrosive environment.

Most (95%+) of the observed conditions are considered typical deterioration. In other words, most of the observed conditions have been observed during inspection of other garages. Therefore the observation, analysis, prioritization, and reporting is fairly repetitive. It is not uncommon for garages to have no unique conditions requiring further investigation.

The objectives of this project take advantage of the repetitive nature of these observations. While an engineer will be involved in a final review and reporting of all findings and recommendations, we believe the collection and preliminary assessment of field data does not require the physical presence of an engineer. The first objective will be to explore, identify and develop the use of autonomous inspection techniques to collect field data, including the use of robotics, drones, camera mounted vehicles, and other devices, operated remotely, autonomously or by non-engineer personnel. The second objective is to explore, identify and develop the use of technology, such as artificial intelligence (AI), to assess and catalog observations against a database of common observations for office based review and reporting by engineering staff. The accomplishment of these two objectives will help us streamline our inspection process, by lowering cost, increasing capacity, and increasing the efficiency of existing engineering staff.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Impulse Technology, LLC CNC machining/water jet cutting of carbon fiber prosthetics. Wong, Tak Sing 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

Project Title: CNC machining/water jet cutting of carbon fiber prosthetics
Sponsor: Impulse Technology


Overview: Carbon fiber based materials are attractive for their high strength to weight ratio, but are difficult to machine. In this project, the objectives are to (i) demonstrate machining of a carbon fiber prosthetic foot and (ii) build a jig that applies force and torque on the manufactured foot for testing. The focus of the first objective is on water jet cutting. This technique fits the foot design philosophy but delamination of the carbon fiber layers has been problematic. Combining water jetting with conventional machining may need to be explored. The second objective involves conventional machining and assembly of a structure that allows the user to apply force and torque at different angles and magnitude. The goal is to apply load on the prosthetic foot that mimic the actual walking.

Impulse Technology is a startup company located at the Penn State Innovation Center. It performs research and development of prosthetic components.

Approach: It is expected that the team will comprise of students with prior experience of high motivation in machining/manufacturing. All the engineering designs will be given by Impulse Technology, so that the team can stay focused on machining. The team will get trained in the machine tools located at the Learning Factory (and familiarized with the water jet cutter). The first task will be cutting carbon fiber sheets without delamination or damage. The team will also use the machine tools to build the prosthetic loading foot structure.

The ME 440 team will work very closely with Professor Aman Haque, who is the CTO and a Co-Founder of Impulse Technology. This project will provide useful experience for the would-be engineers on how the bio-mechanics of walking is mimicked in machine design and how manufacturing techniques govern the design to product transformation.

Requirement: The ME 440 team members must be US citizens. The team skillset should include manufacturing (machine shop techniques) as well as machine design (modeling and finite element analysis). Gait mechanics is a plus but not required.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Jaime McKeever Designs Unscrambler / Sorter Purdum, Charlie 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

1. Research commercially available equipment for similar applications (e.g. non-standard part sizing/sorting/unscrambling)
2. Design/build a prototype model
3. Conduct “proof of principle” tests with the prototype machine
4. Develop cost model for business model development
5. Conduct market research and evaluate business model for viability
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
John Crane Inc. Universal Seal Testing Rig - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH SJTU Martin, Anne 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

John Crane is a global leader in providing mission-critical technologies and services to process industries. We deliver innovative solutions that improve process and equipment reliability though relentless focus on quality, a passion for service and uncompromising commitment to our people, safety, the environment and ethical business practices. Our solutions — ranging from mechanical seals, filtration systems, and couplings — are backed by the largest global service network in the industry.

Mechanical seals are used in centrifugal pumps to limit or prevent product that can leak between the rotating shaft and the stationary housing. The seals are tested over a wide range of operating conditions to ensure design will surpass customer expectations. Given the breadth of designs and operating conditions, it will be beneficial to develop a test rig that can accommodate several configurations. The objective of this project is to design a seal testing rig integrated with a flexible testing systems which could do mechanical wet seal dynamic testing under variable speed, variable pressure and temperature. It shall be adaptable for horizontally and vertically configurations. A monitoring control panel shall be included in the design, so all the measurement during the testing could be collected.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Johnson Controls High performance foam proportioning system - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH SJTU Neal, Gary 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

The proportioning system is an essential element of any foam firefighting system as it ensures the correct mix ratio of foam concentrate to water.
The goal of this project is to design a high performance proportioner with a wider output flow range by studying the structure.
The project requires the knowledge of fluid simultation.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Lockheed Martin 1 Simulated Mars Landing, Resource Discovery and Delivery System Design Erdman, Mike 0 0 3 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The Boeing Company and Lockheed Martin will partner to challenge three teams composed of Mechanical, Electrical, and Computer Engineers to design, build, and test a system of vehicles to land on Mars, navigate rough terrain, and assist with resource discovery and delivery. The goal of this project is to demonstrate the power of collaboration at industry, workforce, and system levels.

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the moon. Since then, companies, industries, and even nations have worked together to explore beyond once-imagined limits and bounds, encouraging our modern society to “look up.” Today, the world’s eyes are set on Mars and the long list of challenges associated with it. For example, on August 6, 2012, the Curiosity rover landed on mars to characterize the Martian climate and geology. More recently, the InSight lander designed to study the planet’s interior successfully touched down on November 26, 2018.

A common theme among these remote landings are the “7 Minutes of Terror” in which the vehicle enters Mars’ thin atmosphere at hypersonic speed and slows to a gentle touchdown on the surface. Adding to the challenge of these entry, descent, and landing phases (EDL) is the eight minute travel time of radio signals from Mars to Earth. This requires complete automation throughout the entire process – one small mistake, and billions of dollars could be lost. To be interstellar pioneers, we must leverage system interoperability and workforce collaboration. When it comes to space exploration, United Launch Alliance (ULA), a joint venture between Boeing and Lockheed Martin, has served as the nation’s leading launch services provider. The ULA is combining Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner and Lockheed Martin Atlas V rockets for the return of US based human spaceflight. Additionally the ULA is leveraging technology from the Boeing Delta IV and Lockheed Martin Atlas V rockets in the design and development of the new Vulcan Centaur launcher. By combining “the best of both worlds,” Boeing and Lockheed Martin can offer an impressive solution.

Similarly, three teams of students will work collaboratively to design, build, test, and demonstrate a Mars system composed of a lander, a rover, a robotic arm, and relevant sensors. One team will develop the rover to navigate the Mars surface, one team will develop the robotic arm and sensors to functionalize the rover, and one team will develop the lander to safely touchdown the system. By employing systems engineering principles, all teams will collectively design the interfacing components and functions to produce a fully integrated solution.

The teams will demonstrate their system’s capabilities to Boeing and Lockheed Martin sponsors at the end of the semester, on the day of the Learning Factory Showcase, by completing a mock landing and resource delivery and discovery mission.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Lockheed Martin 2 Manufacturing Cell Layout and Efficiency DeMeter, Ed 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Scope:
• Evaluate the current production cell layout, product flow, and expected product mix to determine options to maximize efficiency of the cell
• Improve flexibility of product changeover between (2) similar products in production cell
• Improve ergonomic handling of product as it flows from station to station in cell

Deliverables:
• Identify layout and build plan options to improve product flow / handling to satisfy contract demand
• Identify any new fixturing required for both products (i.e. degrees of freedom to rotate/flip product during build)
• Improve available workspace by removing clutter and mounting tools
• Improve parts presentation to the cell (Currently using small bins to hold hardware and CREFORM® carts and racks with shadow boards to hold materials at workstation; Replenished as req’d each day from Prep Cell operators)

Comments:
• Visit the facility to gain understanding of the issues and assess customer needs
• Collect information about current layout and common issues
• Brainstorm solutions to plan to identify options and provide cost impact (ROI)
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Lockheed Martin 3 - Missiles and Fire Control Linear Laser Pattern Generator (LLPG) Ray, Asok 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

A laser guided flight vehicle is equipped with an optical system that responds to a designated light source or laser spot during flight. The vehicle steers and guides itself towards a specified target based on laser acquisition. Therefore, during development, it is important to test the fidelity of the optical system by simulating the light source and varying the laser spot position. Currently, Lockheed Martin utilizes a fixture with fixed laser positions and orientations without any adjustment or variability. The students shall design a test instrument with the added capability of automatically changing the position and orientation of a light source and generate various light patterns on a 2-dimensional plane. The system shall fit within a housing and interface with an external optical system. Housing and interface requirements and specifications shall be defined by the sponsors. Project deliverables shall include a presentation of design concepts, a functioning prototype of the test instrument, a final design report, and poster presentation of the entire project.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Lycoming Engines Engine Gearbox Design and Analysis VonLockette, Paris 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Lycoming Engines manufactures direct drive air-cooled piston engines for aircraft ranging from 5 to 400 horsepower. Lycoming is investigating the potential for a new high-speed engine model which will incorporate a front mounted propeller speed reduction unit (PSRU), or gearbox. The goal for this project is to design the PSRU for the proposed engine model. Students will analytically evaluate five gear train options including external spur, external spur with dual idler gears, internal spur, simple spur planetary, and short/long pinion spur planetary. Each final design must have the same effective gear ratio from input to output, the same offset (for the spur gears designs), and for the same input torque the same factor of safety (gear teeth, shafts, and bearings). To aid in the design process students will create a simplified CAD drawing/model of each gearbox . The team and Lycoming will select the best design considering the total weight, cost, and packaging. A detailed CAD model will be created of the final design and will be prototyped into a functioning display model (able to rotate by hand with a clear case or cutaways for viewing the gearing). Primary deliverables will then include a detailed report and presentation to Lycoming of the design path including analysis, models, and the advantages and disadvantages of each design.

Requirements:
- Analysis of each specified gearbox configuration
- Comparison of weight, cost, and packaging associated with each design
- CAD model of final gear train design (models of other designs optional)
- Functional working prototype of the final proposed design
- Detailed technical report

Provided Materials/Information:
- Engine performance data (power output, shaft speed, etc.)
- Requirements of the gearbox (output speed, factor of safety, gearbox offset,
materials, etc.)
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Mack Trucks Inc. Predictive Operational Model in Diversity Manufacturing concept Purdum, Charlie 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 1 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Project Requirement:

Project aims to build up the manufacturing predictive model to pro actively judge , product impact based on data intelligence and expertise and experience built in “New project model “ via historical data base and trend in current production using advance engineering technology .



Deliverables :
Data model to predict production impact
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
MACOM Technology Solutions Inc. Panini Press Redesign for Printed Circuit Board to Heatsink Attachment Wheeler, Timothy 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

MACOM is a leader in the RF and microwave field, developing high frequency products and subsystems for over 60 years. Printed Circuit boards are our life blood needed for developing and evaluating components we ship to customers. Therefore, it is very important that we can easily build reliable test fixtures.

PCBs are attached to supporting metal heatsinks using either high melting temperature Sn63 solder, or low curing temperature silver sheet epoxy depending on the final application.

Current equipment consists of a converted T-shirt press using 2 SS platens embedded with a bank of 7in thermal heating rods. The heatsink, solder or epoxy, and PCB sandwich is squeezed together, subjected to different load and temperature profiles to create a properly bonded circuit board. System is actuated by hand with a mechanical lever, and clamping force is adjusted by turning a hand screw. Two digital gages display Force and Temperature readouts from a load cell and thermocouple sensor.

Scope:
Ground-up Equipment redesign using a different method of applying pressure and
temperature to attach PCBs to Copper Heatsinks.

Common problem with existing equipment:
Large heavy system
Overly complex setup
Alignment method needs improvement
Thermal and load profiles not recorded or undefined.
Heat rods embedded in extremely flat platens that are expensive to fabricate.
Thermocouple control too far removed from PCB attach point
Platens use relatively low thermally conductive Stainless Steel

Desired Features:
Mechanical:
Portable, table top size – transportable by a single user
Easy to setup and adjust
Adjustable from 5mm to 25mm Heatsink thickness, and 250mm square minimum
Capable of attaching Tin/Lead sheet Solder and Silver Epoxy
Simple heatsink positioning method - Universal alignment system for different
stack up heights, to keep circuit board and heatsink aligned to a tight tolerance
Robust, unlikely to break in normal use.
Safe Activation, dual hand start, insulated surfaces
Non-hand Screw based, Pnuematic, or mechanical Load setting method
for ease of use and improved repeatability

Digital Monitoring & Control:
Programable thermal profiles, similar to reflow oven capability
Data collection of temp and pressure profiles over time
Load cell with Digital Force display, load requirement >500lbF,
Display load profiles
Bond quality is determined by the force per unit area and will vary with heatsink
area. Bond Pressure should be displayed or graphed as the primary quality
indicator.
Currently no redundant temperature readings - Back up thermocouple system
needed to verify accurate heating.

Thermal Heating & Control:
Heat Spreaders and heat pipes
PCB Temperature needs to be capable of reaching 250degC
Embedded cooling to minimize Attach process cycle time
Thermal heating Pads, Inductive elements
Standard outlet 120VAC/ 15A max power supply
Insulation for reduced energy consumption

Stretch Goal:
Simple control interface using Raspberry PI or other equivalent
Data viewable on a web browser connected to a tablet

Deliverables:
Physical:
Working Prototype
Drawing set including SolidWorks models, pdf, dwg,
Ansys stress analysis models
Completed bonded heatsink/PCB samples
Data:
Temp and pressure profiles of new system
Calculations comparing proposed design against existing design.
1st Pass Brainstorm notes to explore possibilities no matter how far out.
Written Setup and User manuals
Poster Board summarizing project
IP will be maintained with MACOM

Suggested Disciplines:
Mechanical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Computer Science for Stretch Goals
Project Requires an experienced SolidWorks student.
Project may benefit from an experienced Ansys user
if thermal analysis performed by students.

MACOM SUPPORT TEAM:
Seamus Beirne, Troy Puchini, Anuja Jonnalagadda, Dennis Acuna
MACOM SPONSERS: Mike Raneri, Thomas Goss

Note: Project proposal available in pdf format
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Manitowoc Cranes Wear Measurement Test Fixture Wong, Tak Sing 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Manitowoc Cranes is committed to providing the most innovative, advanced and comprehensive range of lifting solutions, with products that have long set the standard for excellence worldwide: Grove mobile telescoping cranes, Manitowoc lattice boom crawler cranes, Potain tower cranes, National Crane boom trucks and Shuttlelift industrial cranes. All our products have a lot of moving parts, and there are many pinned connections. A pinned connection is great, because it allows for two parts to rotate in relation to each other while carrying very high loads. One downfall of a pinned connection though, is that due to their high load and rotating nature, it is very difficult to find a coating or surface treatment that will prevent corrosion over the life of the pin.

Manitowoc prides itself on thoroughly testing not only every model of crane they manufacture, but also many of the components that make up a crane. At the Manitowoc Product Verification Center (PVC) teams develop test procedures and carry them out to perform accelerated life testing on the various components. Currently the PVC does not have the capability to perform accelerated life/wear testing on round pins. The student project team is tasked to research, design, and develop a test fixture that can be used to test the wear characteristics of various round pin platings, such as hard chrome or nickel plating. The fixture should be able to accept pins with diameters anywhere between 25mm to 100mm, and there should be a way to apply a normal load on the wear block. The project results must include a test procedure that uses the test fixture to measure wear characteristics and wear rate.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PCC Structurals Inc. Ingot Notch and Break Apparatus - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH SJTU Neal, Gary 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

PCC is an industry leader in the manufacture of investment castings for the aerospace industry. The PCC San Leandro, CA plant specializes in the production of vacuum melted nickel base castings.
Key product families include Afterburner Flaps, TCF Fairings, and Combustor Liners manufactured in superalloys such as Rene 41, Rene 108, and B1900. Raw material master heats are produced by approved suppliers in 10,000 pound heat lots which are shipped to the San Leandro plant in the form of 4 inch diameter by 3 ½ foot long cylinders weighing approximately 165 pounds each. Typical individual charge weights for the various product families we produce range from 30 pounds to 60 pounds which are melted in our VIM furnaces. Thus, the 4 inch diameter ingot cylinders need to be notched and broken to meet the exact charge weight each part number requires.

PCC - SL is interested in a newly designed “ingot breaking” apparatus that meets the following criteria:
- Operational safety minimizing risk to melt department personnel
- Improved accuracy of the individual broken ingot charge, goal is +/- ½ pound
tolerance
- Improved operational efficiency of the apparatus
- Extended life of the anvil mechanism, materials engineering aspect of the project

Deliverables may include
- multiple conceptual designs
- design selection criteria
- final design drawing set
- proof of concept prototype
- vendor quote for fabrication
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Philips Ultrasound R&D Lab Layout and work flow optimization Cannon, Dave 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Project Description:
Philips Ultrasound, Reedsville, PA designs and manufactures Medical Ultrasound transducers. Our R&D lab space will expand this year. Our Research and Development Lab is tasked with providing Materials investigation, Root Cause of Failure Analysis, Prototype assembly, Assembly Process Development and Qualification Testing. Our lab test capability includes Acoustic Microscopy, Visual Microscopy, DMA, TMA, DSC, Various accelerated Life test equipment, Topple Test, Environmental Chamber testing, FTIR analysis, and Mechanical pull strength testing. We would like to have a review of the available space utilization with a proposal developed and modeled that provides improved work flow, capacity for the increase in Test through put, and maintain 6s compliance in our Lean Factory environment.

Deliverables:
1. Assessment of current system including input from internal stakeholders
2. Recommend Equipment and work bench layout in AutoCAD to optimize utilization and workflow.
3. Proposed process for qualification test request and maximizing equipment utilization.
4. Modeled workflow and proposed equipment for increased capacity.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PMG-Pennnsylvania LLC ASSET MANAGEMENT AND MATERIAL HANDLING IMPROVEMENT Ray, Asok 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

Deliverables and Project Plan:
Phase I
• Review the current plant layout and numbering system for the material handling conveyors. Review the bills of materials, risk analysis and FMEA developed by the Fall 2108 capstone team. Report on the understanding of the plans and develop a timeline to complete the BOM. Report #1 week 2/3

Phase II
• Develop the list of required components to complete all BOM requirements. Delegate the responsibilities of the actions within the team. Design in modeling software the template for the rollers for each material handling system. Report #2 week 6/7

Phase III
• Complete the design/draft the critical components for each conveyor. (Will need a significant amount of solid modeling and drafting support) Report #3 week 10

Phase IV
• Develop a quotation for all critical spare parts with risk levels and cost and present to the maintenance and procurement group. Report #4 week 13

Phase V
• Summarize all activities and report results to the President and Chief Financial Officer. Report #5 week 14
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Posture Pack, Inc. Dr. Frank's Posture Pack Szczesny, Spencer 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The Posture Pack is a wearable device devised of two main components. There is the pack which is a modified transcutaneous electric muscle stimulator attached to an adhesive electrode pad shaped in such a way that it contacts the major muscles of shoulder retraction. When in use, the pack will create Passive Postural Muscle Stimulation (PPMS) in order to strengthen postural muscles in the user's upper/mid back and improve posture.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Applied Research Laboratory 1 Print Plastic to Make Metal Voigt, Robert 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 1 3 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The purpose of this project is to explore the potential of using desktop 3D printers to create patterns for use in metal casting. 3D printing promises “free complexity” in terms of design freedom, but this has not been fully explored in support of the casting manufacturing process to, for example, integrate risers/runners/gates, influence surface finish, reduce cores, etc. Project teams are expected to explore and identify changes to the traditional design process for casting when 3D printing is introduced.

Teams will be expected to design/identify and create exemplary components for use in the casting process. The selected pattern should then be fabricated using a variety of printers (e.g., FDM, SLA), print material, print parameters (e.g., layer height), etc., and then used to make molds that are then cast using (likely) aluminum. The cast parts should then be characterized and described by several metrics such as as-cast mass, and surface finish.

Expected outcomes of this project include:
• Report on the entire process of design, print, cast
• Results of a design of experiments including a variety of material, printer, and process parameters used
• Generation of any CAD geometry, simulation, or additive manufacturing files
• Metal castings with clear identification, solid model, printing parameters, etc.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Applied Research Laboratory 2 Benchtop model of Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel Erdman, Mike 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel is an experimental research facility operated by the Applied Research Laboratory at Penn State. It is used to measure the hydrodynamic performance of hardware for both the U.S. Navy and industry. Due to the enormous scale of the facility, the working principles of the water tunnel can be difficult to communicate to sponsors and visitors. ARL would like a functioning scale model of the facility that can be easily transported for on-site demonstrations and open houses. The scale model should demonstrate the major components of the water tunnel, including the impeller, test section, test hardware, and velocity measurement. Emphasis should be placed on robustness, portability, and similarity to the full scale facility.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU ARL Gear Research Institute/CIMP 3-D Evaluating the strength of 3D printed plastic gears for replacement parts Kimel, Allen 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Given the widespread availability of 3D printers now, more and more companies are starting to offer online parts catalogues and digital repositories for consumers to 3D print replacement parts (e.g., https://3dprint.com/230707/whirlpool-partners-with-spare-parts-3d/) or spare parts that can no longer be purchased (https://newsroom.porsche.com/fallback/en/company/porsche-classic-3d-printer-spare-parts-sls-printer-production-cars-innovative-14816.html). While knobs, dials, and buttons may be suitable candidates for 3D printing, there has been little scientific research into the suitability of 3D printed plastic gears for spares/replacement parts.

Given the anisotropy that is common in many polymer 3D printing processes, we seek a capstone design team to help develop and demonstrate a procedure for evaluating the strength -- and life -- of a 3D printed plastic gear. The team should research testing protocols and standards for evaluating the strength and life of gears, in general, including individual gear teeth, and then design and conduct a study of a specific 3D printed plastic gear. This study should include identifying an existing type of gear and its material, designing and fabricating a replacement gear in the same material on a 3D printer, and then evaluating both gears through a series of tests. The team should then make recommendations based on analysis of the results and demonstrate the use of a 3D printed plastic gear in an actual application (e.g., 3D printer, remote control car, robot, toy, etc.).
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Artificial Heart Lab Automated Filter Wheel for Fluorescent Microscopy Kelly, Deb 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

In fluorescent microscopy, filters are often used to distinguish between tracer particles that respond to different emission wavelengths. A motorized filter wheel allows the user to rapidly switch from one filter to another or to automatically cycle between different filters, creating a collection of images taken at set time intervals or images rapidly stitched together into a video. The construction of a motorized filter wheel by a team of students should provide an opportunity to develop skills in Computer Aided Design, programming, assembly and fabrication, and imaging techniques. The final product should include the following aspects: A frame to hold filters, which can be swapped with standard filter lenses on the market, a motor powering rotation between these filter ports, a controller to input commands for the wheel perhaps using Arduino. This wheel must be easily stocked with commercial filters and be small enough to mount to a typical microscope, and have the capability to be fitted to standard mounting brackets for a microscope and light source.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Athletics Refinement of Hockey Puck Passing Machine VonLockette, Paris 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

During the Spring 2018 and Fall 2018 semesters we worked with two groups of students through the Learning Factory to develop and then significantly enhance a prototype machine to pass hockey pucks.

The Spring 2018 team was able to develop a workable machine, but it faced a number of problems that need to be improved upon in order to make it usable on daily basis. It was never tested on ice. The needed improvements were - 1) Reduction/elimination of vibrations from motor used to launch the puck. 2) Improved puck storage capacity 3) Improved functionality related to puck speed, display and other electrical components. 4) The overall size, weight and portability of the machine is prohibitive for regular use or development into a viable product and needs to be reduced significantly. 5) Significant on-ice testing is needed, which did not occur during last semester's project.

The Fall 2018 team made significant improvements and developed a working prototype. However, there are some areas that need further refinement in order to be at a level that is beneficial for a high level collegiate hockey program. Specifically - 1) speed of puck launching needs to double; 2) the ability to have the machine function in very cold temperatures (it works at the desired speed in controlled temperatures, but can only perform at low speeds on ice); 3) the mechanism that advances a single puck to the launching mechanism does not currently function; 4) the product needs to be encased and made further portable. The recommendations from the team for future development were:

"The recommendation for any future work is to improve the project focus on the shooting system, which can solve additional issues. The motor that launches the pucks at the end is very heavy and causes vibrations in the system. The vibrations lead to the speed variability being an issue due to reaching a resonant frequency at certain speeds. Also, the vibrations meant that the base and supports had to be stronger to support it all, therefore increasing the weight of the project dramatically. The weight of the motor and the required supports also increased the overall weight more than required.

If a similar launching mechanism is requested, the recommendation is to gain a lighter, sturdier motor for the launching system. If the launching system can be vastly altered, a pneumatic launching system is recommended. This is the strongest recommendation. A pneumatic system is inexpensive, lightweight, and has no rotating parts. This would fix all of the issues and allow the project to be completely successful and meet or exceed all customer requirements. The only issue with pneumatics is safety with an air compressor or air tank on the ice, so a complete protection system must also be in place so ensure safety for all. This overhaul could be completed by another semester’s project.

Attached photos show version one and two of the project.

Project sponsor is retaining the IP rights, but is willing to consider sharing those rights with the student team.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Beaver Stadium Beaver Stadium Gate Ingress and Restroom Access Purdum, Charlie 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

We would like to explore the way our ingress gate system is set up. This includes how mobile bike racks are set up, where signage is placed, where items are checked, etc. We would also like to explore ways to better the customer experience when utilizing the restrooms.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Biomechanics Laboratory Enhancement of a Knee Testing Apparatus Szczesny, Spencer 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Cadaveric knee simulators are a common means for testing the function of natural and artificial knees. They are often called 'Oxford Rigs', because one of the first successful versions was developed at the University of Oxford in the UK. These devices simulate knee flexion under quadriceps load in a sort of a deep-knee bend configuration. One such Oxford Rig is in the Biomechanics Laboratory in the Department of Kinesiology at Penn State (in 29 Recreation Building). The PSU Oxford Rig has been used to test total knee replacement components in several studies funded by Stryker Orthopaedics since it was designed and installed in 2002. Please see the attached images for a schematic drawing of a generic Oxford Rig and a photograph of the PSU Oxford Rig.

Another Stryker-funded project is about to begin in 2019, presenting us with an opportunity to make several critical improvements to the design and functionality of the PSU Oxford Rig. These modifications fall into four broad categories of deliverables:

1. Mechanical alterations to the degrees of freedom, application of quadriceps loading, and simulation of other muscle forces such as the hamstrings.

2. A control system to replace the current manual control that would permit the precise specification of the speed of knee flexion.

3. Modification of quadriceps actuation and addition of sensors for measuring the loads carried by the tendons and joint contact.

4. Safety measures (software and hardware) to ensure that researchers using the device are not at risk should the knee specimen fail.

Please note the following:

A. While the Oxford Rig may be used to test cadaver specimens, it also can be used to test mechanical analogs for cadaver specimens (i.e., the femur and tibia represented by metal rods and knee replacement components for the knee). Students working on this project will work with such a mechanical analog, and will not come in contact with cadaver materials.

B. Students working on this project can expect to have substantial interaction with personnel from Stryker Orthopaedics, as we will be redesigning the PSU Oxford Rig to meet specifications for the upcoming Stryker-funded project. Stryker engineers will be visiting Penn State and we will arrange a team visit to Stryker's Mahwah, NJ location as part of the project. This will be a good opportunity for students interested in the orthopaedics or medical devices industries.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU BME 1 Large-scale single-cell RNA-seq analysis of human stem cell differentiation Medina, Scott 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Human pluripotent stem cell-derived somatic cells have risen as a useful tool in disease modeling and regenerative medicine. However, inefficiency of the currently available stem cell differentiation protocol and underlying heterogeneity of human stem cell-derived cells remain as major limitations of stem cell technology. Here we propose to use single cell RNA-seq (scRNA-seq) technology to understand stem cell differentiation. ScRNA-seq enables analysis of thousands of cells in parallel, allowing comprehensive analysis of transcriptional heterogeneity. This knowledge will be useful for our understanding of cell differentiation and enabling more efficient differentiation protocols.

Shanghai JiaoTong University: Students from Shanghai will analyze scRNA-seq data for definitive endoderm differentiation.

Penn State: Students from PSU will analyze scRNA-seq data for endothelial cell differentiation.

Combining both analyses will improve our understanding of stem cell differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU BME 2 MR-compatible Olfactometer Kelly, Deb 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

The olfactometer to be made needs to achieve two functions: (1) to send scented air into the bore, and (2) to clear out the scent quickly so as to achieve precise time control. This device will be used to measure the brain response to different odors using functional magnetic resonance imaging.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU BME 3 3-D bioprinting of nanoparticle-based tissue constructs Medina, Scott 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Students will synthesize nanoparticles and apply nanoparticles to generate three-dimensional synthetic tissue constructs for regenerative medicine.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU BME 4 Design and implementation of a liquid biopsy instrument for non-invasive cancer diagnosis Kelly, Deb 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Cancer is a group of diseases involving uncontrolled cell growth. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare tumor cells transiently present in the circulation, which are shed from primary tumors, extravasate from the peripheral blood, seed and colonize the distant organs, forming the deadly metastasis. CTCs count and analysis is an emerging liquid biopsy technology for non-invasive cancer diagnosis. However, CTCs are extremely rare cells in blood on the level of 1 out of billions of blood cells. It is a significant challenge to enrich CTCs and analyze them to extract valuable clinical information.
The Penn State MiniBio group led by Prof. Siyang Zheng invented a microfiltration technology to isolated CTCs. The microfilter is manufactured at Penn State Nanofabrication center. It has been validated with many clinical samples. However, almost all the testing has been performed with manual operation. The goal of the project is to design an instrument that takes the microfilter as a cartridge, filter the blood automatically and immunologically stain the captured CTCs in a controlled manner. A prototype instrument for blood filtration has been developed before and therefore can serve as the basis and reference of the new development. This is a highly interdisciplinary project. It is expected to involve fluid control by pump and valves, electrical circuitry, microcontroller programming, graphic interface design and implementation, and biochemical and immunological assay development.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU BME 5 Design, Simulation, and Development of a Wearable Photoacoustic Hat for Neonatal Brain Imaging Szczesny, Spencer 1 0 3 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Currently there are no ideal imaging technologies available for imaging vascular malformations of neonatal brain. X-Ray and MRI are hard to transport to Neonatal Intensive Care Units, and they also require contrast agents to image vasculature and vascular malformations. Ultrasound tomography based blood flow mapping has also met with limited success mostly due to poor contrast to vasculature. Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) has recently emerged as an ideal technology for label-free imaging of vasculature and associated oxygen saturation with high spatial and temporal resolutions, as demonstrated in pre-clinical studies of mouse brain imaging. However, the clinical translation of PACT for humans posses some challenges, especially adult brain imaging, due to strong scattering of acoustic waves. However, neonatal skull is relatively much thinner and it is possible to develop a PACT helmet device that can map vasculature of neonatal brain vasculature.

This project tackles the challenges of photoacoustic acoustic tomography of neonatal brain by using novel theoretical, simulation as well as experimental approaches to design and develop a helmet like device that incorporates sparsely distributed light sources and ultrasound detectors. Senior design students work in this project, with help of a mentoring team (graduate student, a postdoctoral scholar and Dr.Kothapalli), will help design and fabricate the helmet.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU BME 6 Near-Field Electrospinning Capable BioPrinter Kelly, Deb 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

This project seeks to construct a bioprinter capable:
1. Traditional extrusion based bioprinting of a range of 'inks' (e.g. Gelatin-methacrylate)
2. Near-field electrospinning of linear biomaterials (e.g. poly(lactic acid))
with the following stretch goals
1. Enclosed printer with an incorporated HEPA filter for bench top printing.
2. Multi bio-ink extruders
The completion of this bioprinter will enable the production of a range of living constructs capable of presenting unique microstructure anisotropy appropriate for a range of tissues, such as, the meniscus in the knee or periodontal ligaments.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU BME 7 Development of Novel Hairy Hydroxyapatite Strengthened Membrane Project as Artificial Periosteum Medina, Scott 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

This global capstone project is a collaborative effort with Honk Kong Polytech University to develop a new electrospun biomaterial graft for use in the repair and regeneration of functional periosteum.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU CEE RIFFLE (Remote Independent Friendly Field-Logger Electronics) Wheeler, Timothy 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Motivation:
Water quality data coupled with the emerging field of data science has the potential to expedite scientific research and inform decisions about water resource allocation. Current water sensors are large, cumbersome to use and require specialized maintenance in order to gain reliable data sources. This limits the number of sensors citizen groups can deploy as well as the duration that they can be maintained. The Learning Factory Team of senior undergraduate students from multiple disciplines will develop a low cost (<$60) water quality sensor called the RIFFLE (Remote Independent Friendly Field-Logger Electronics) to measure conductivity, turbidity, colorimetry and temperature. A current prototype of this device is available with functioning hardware and software. The prototype RIFFLE can record accurate conductivity values in solutions over a range of salinities typical of freshwater environments with strong correlation to values reported by HACH conductivity probes. R2 of 0.998 (0 to 1,000 uS/cm) and 0.9891 over a broad range 0-8,000 uS/cm.
The students will modify the design or redesign such that 1) the device could be easily assembled by a layperson, 2) the battery life is maximized, and 3) additional functions can be incorporated into the design, including wireless communication and data logging capabilities.
Objectives:
We have completed initial testing of the RIFFLE data logger board and sensors. The initial design selection of the RIFFLE, including the 3-D printed housing, sensor geometry, and data-logging methods (e.g., SD card, Bluetooth or USB) have been completed. As our chief users for the RIFFLE are community groups and citizen scientists, it is important that the RIFFLE be flexible for a variety of monitoring needs. We would initially like to optimize sensing for conductivity, including verification of sensitivity at environmentally relevant concentrations. Accurate turbidity, temperature and colorimetry based data are also desirable. Following laboratory bench scale testing the RIFFLE will be deployed in local waterways. This initial deployment will ensure adequate durability, data logging, longevity of the sensor and functionality upon retrieval. For example, the housing must be tested and fabricated for longevity through exposure to the elements. Additionally, ability of the RIFFLEs to be retrieved and data collected following large storm events needs to be verified. Following retrieval/collection of the RIFFLEs the design will be modified as necessary for a second round of installations.
Specific objectives for this study are:
• Refine the existing sensor design such that it can be easily implemented by a layperson. This includes setup, deployment and data collection from the sensor.
• Expand the sensor with other capabilities, such as pH and wireless communication.
• Develop support materials in the form of how-to guides, video tutorials and lesson plans to facilitate construction and use of the sensor by citizen scientists, students and teachers.
Deliverables for the project:
1) Data that shows success of the RIFFLE at environmentally relevant concentrations.
2) Working prototype(s) of the RIFFLE capable of logging temperature, conductivity, colorimetry and turbidity for retrieval through a memory card or wireless data download.
3) A manual for citizens and other students that describes how to assemble, program, and deploy the RIFFLE.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU CIMP-3D 1 Understanding Powder Spreading for Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing - Team 1 Kimel, Allen 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

As additive manufacturing (AM) technologies continue to mature, developing feedstock material specifications becomes of paramount importance for high-value aerospace and medical applications. A variety of powder characterization techniques are available for evaluating both specific powder characteristics, such as the particle size distribution, and bulk characteristics related to powder flowability. In the case of powder bed fusion (PBF) AM, however, flowability metrics may not be appropriate for understanding the influence of powder characteristics on the shear-driven recoating process. This project aims to understand how various powder quality metrics influence the ability of powder feedstock to spread across a build plate, and it is believed that these results can inform future feedstock specifications for PBF. A powder spreading rig, equipped with a variety of sensing technologies has already been developed and validated. Six samples of Al-10Si-0.5Mg gas atomized powder, a common alloy used in AM, will first be characterized using a variety of equipment, including the Hall Flowmeter, the Freeman Technology FT4 Powder Rheometer, and the Mercury Scientific REVOLUTION Powder Analyzer. Then, spreading tests will be performed using the powder spreadability rig according to a student-created design of experiments (DOE) and three metrics from the spreadability rig will be used as input to an analysis of variance (ANOVA). From these results, the influence of the powder characteristics can be statistically correlated to the spreading performance to determine which powder quality metrics are most representative of spreadability.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU CIMP-3D 2 Understanding Powder Spreading for Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing - Team 2 Kimel, Allen 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

As additive manufacturing (AM) technologies continue to mature, developing feedstock material specifications becomes of paramount importance for high-value aerospace and medical applications. A variety of powder characterization techniques are available for evaluating both specific powder characteristics, such as the particle size distribution, and bulk characteristics related to powder flowability. In the case of powder bed fusion (PBF) AM, however, flowability metrics may not be appropriate for understanding the influence of powder characteristics on the shear-driven recoating process. This project aims to understand how various powder quality metrics influence the ability of powder feedstock to spread across a build plate, and it is believed that these results can inform future feedstock specifications for PBF. A powder spreading rig, equipped with a variety of sensing technologies has already been developed and validated. Six samples of Al-10Si-0.5Mg gas atomized powder, a common alloy used in AM, will first be characterized using a variety of equipment, including the Hall Flowmeter, the Freeman Technology FT4 Powder Rheometer, and the Mercury Scientific REVOLUTION Powder Analyzer. Then, spreading tests will be performed using the powder spreadability rig according to a student-created design of experiments (DOE) and three metrics from the spreadability rig will be used as input to an analysis of variance (ANOVA). From these results, the influence of the powder characteristics can be statistically correlated to the spreading performance to determine which powder quality metrics are most representative of spreadability.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU College of Arts & Architecture, SVA Multi-Material and Polychromatic 3D Printing in Clay Kimel, Allen 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Project Title: Multi-Material and Polychromatic extrusion 3D Printing in clay.

Proposal Initiated by: Tom Lauerman, Associate Professor of Studio Art / Ceramics / Digital Design, College of Art & Architecture, School of Visual Arts, Penn State University

Project Overview: 3D printing in clay has several noteworthy attributes: It leverages an exceedingly inexpensive material (clay), it has the potential to scale up to enormous sizes without massive costs; it can be post-processed using a tremendous range of traditional craft processes; it can yield food safe, well-insulated end use parts; it can be used to create permanent works of Art & Design suitable for gallery and/or museum display indoors or outdoors in any weather conditions without significant degradation or loss of color/surface vibrancy. This project will develop a methodology and perform testing in extrusion 3D printing with clay in multiple colors and multiple materials. There are two principal areas of exploration: 1. Multi color printing for aesthetic and design complexity. 2. Multi-material printing for support generation - in which one material is clay and a second material is a combustible support (clay is processed in a furnace, so any material which combusts under 2000 degrees fahrenheit and is not toxic in combustion may work.)

Project Rationale: Very few examples can be found of extrusion clay 3D printing in multiple colors and/or materials. Those that can be found appear to be in early stages of development or not under active development. None of the examples that could be found are using a printer design with the large scale capability of the custom printer housed in SoVA. The potential for this process is significant as it will enable the generation of objects which are technically complex as well as aesthetically sophisticated.

Project Background: Extrusion clay printing using a consumer grade 3D printer was first explored by the Belgian design pair Studio Unfold in late 2009. In the years since there has been steady growth in interest and capability around clay extrusion printing, particularly in the open source 3D printing community and within schools and studios of Art & Design. Beginning in the Fall of 2015 with a previous Learning Factory project, clay printing at Penn State School of Visual Arts (SoVA) has steadily improved in terms of resolution, reliability, scale, and complexity. This project builds upon three and a half years of constant research and development.This project will develop and test multi-material and polychromatic (multi-color) extrusion clay printing. The Penn State SoVA clay printer, housed in the studio (104 Arts Cottage) of faculty member Tom lauerman is a robust and reliable custom-built device which has recently been outfitted with dual extrusion capability. Penn State SoVA, Learning Factory, and CiMP-3D have been deeply involved in the development of extrusion clay printing and continue to push boundaries in terms of scale and complexity. Penn State SoVA is a nationally ranked graduate program in the area of Studio Art-Ceramics, and is now a pioneer in 3D printing in clay via extrusion processes. Tom Lauerman has presented his work in this area at universities, conferences, and exhibitions in the US and the UK.

For more information on faculty member Tom Lauerman’s development of this process please follow this link: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+TomLauerman

To see a range of artworks created using these processes please follow this link: https://tomlauerman.com/

A Note on Materials: Extrusion printing in clay substitutes a material which typically has to be partially combusted with some risk of chemical exposure (plastics) with a material that can be extruded at room temperature without any resultant fumes (clay). Clay is abundant worldwide and particularly in Pennsylvania. One aspect of this project will be to test the suitability of clays sourced on-campus and at nearby locations including Shaver’s Creek.

Project Deliverables:
High Quality finished objects in multi-material and/or multi-color (polychrome) ceramic demonstrating capabilities of the processes tested.
A testing methodology developed for the process of multi-material and/or multi-color clay printing. This methodology will be developed, implemented, and documented by the Learning Factory team.

This project proposal came about in conversations about 3D Printing in clay with Dr. Tim Simpson, who encouraged the submission of this proposal from the School of Visual Arts. Dr. Simpson has generously agreed to fund this project.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Department of Chemistry Photothermal additive manufacturing of rubbers VonLockette, Paris 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

DELIVERABLE: Functioning liquid delivery system that can be retrofitted onto a commercial 3D printer, will interface with 3D printing software, and which will deliver defined multicomponent mixtures at a controlled rate.

MOTIVATION: Additive manufacturing is an emerging means of manufacturing that promises the ability to create objects at the point of need and to customize each object to the desired application. Such capabilities could reduce costs associated with supply chain management (devices created on-demand) while also increasing the utility of the final part (devices tailored to each use case). However, in order for additive manufacturing to realize its full potential, it will be necessary to generate objects from the full range of materials used in in our modern world. Presently, devices made from elastomeric materials (which can be deformed to several times their size) cannot be manufactured using additive manufacturing techniques and so certain applications, such as flexible medical implants or soft robotic actuators, cannot yet be addressed by additive manufacturing.

Until recently, the chief barrier to additive manufacturing of elastomers was due to the underlying chemistry, which requires the ability to apply heat with extreme spatial and temporal control – driving the chemical reaction that generates an elastomer from its liquid precursors. However, recent work from the sponsor’s laboratory has solved this chemical problem. Now, the primary problems are of an engineering nature.

To understand the engineering challenges, it is important to understand the chemical technology. In short, we use the photothermal effect of nanoscale materials to provide the heat required to drive the needed polymer chemistry. We synthesize and disperse highly absorbing nanoscale materials within a liquid polymer precursor. Shining light on this dispersion causes the nanoscale materials to heat (i.e., the photothermal effect), and we use this heat to drive the transformation from liquid to solid elastomeric polymers. Importantly, the light only acts to enhance the rate of elastomer formation – once the pre-polymers are mixed, they will generate the elastomer on their own.

For a typical elastomer in the absence of photothermal heating, the liquid precursors will form a solid over the course of hours – a timescale that competes with the rate of additive manufacturing. What this means, is that the light-responsive mixture cannot be generated in batch, but must be mixed at the point of use. What is needed, to leverage our chemical technology for additive manufacturing of elastomers, is delivery system that can produce the light-responsive mixture, and deliver this mixture to the print head of a 3D printer as it prints. This system is the deliverable for the project.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU EGEE 1 Rotating wear table to measure PDC bits wear Song, Chunshan 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

As shown in the attached schematic pictures and the video link, the purpose of this project is building a rotating table with constant RPM to rotate a hard-rock slab (like granite) below a PDC cutter for different applied weights on the cutter. The proposed equipment should accommodate different cutter shapes like the video and also the control and electrical component should be designed in such a way that liquid could be used for colling the cutting process.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU EGEE 2 Building an apparatus to measure gas leakage through cemented shale gas Wells Song, Chunshan 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The purpose of this project is building a setup to measure the permeability of cement samples prone to gas leakage from oil and gas high-pressure high-temperature reservoirs. The outcome of this project will help the oil companies to better design cementing jobs before implementing fracking treatments. The apparatus general design is available for the student to start working on design details.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU EGEE 3 Design for Flexibility in Power Systems Eser, Semih 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

As the share of intermittent renewable generation increases in the electric power system, the remaining dispatchable technologies come under increasing pressure to make supply and demand equal at every point in time. This is a growing concern with power system planners. In this project, the team will take an actual power system, the Public Service of New Mexico system, and design the optimal mix of generation technologies to accommodate an increase in wind and solar generation.

This project will be computational in nature, requiring linear and stochastic programming to optimize the capacity investments and operations scheduling. This project is particularly suited to Energy Engineers, and builds on EGEE 451, but may also be appropriate for Industrial Engineering, Electrical Engineering, or Computer Science majors with programming and optimization experience.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU EMCLab Design of Ceramic Water Filter Porous Structure to Maximize Filtration Rate and Bacteria Removal Ounaies, Zoubeida 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 0 2 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Overview: Lack of safe drinking water, pervasive disease, and substandard sanitation are known as the global water crisis. Among the most active means of responding to the global water crisis include efforts by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), not-for-profit groups, concerned independent citizens, social activists, and artists who produce and distribute silver nanoparticle-enhanced point-of-use ceramic water filters manufactured from local materials in communities in need. The water filters are one of a few affordable responses to water borne disease. Since the late 1990s, thousands of the filters have been produced, distributed, and used in the developing and third world.

The project seeks to advance a materials-enabled low-cost approach to provide clean water in remote areas. The point-of-use ceramic water filters are designed as a first response and temporary solution to provide clean water in remote areas where, although water is amply accessible, it is contaminated with waterborne disease and therefore unsuitable for consumption. The primary goal is to use a combination of experimental and testing capabilities to modify, adapt, or augment current point-of-use ceramic water filters to enable a wider range of filtration capabilities through the development of metal nanoparticle-modified ceramic materials with improved porous structure.

Objectives: The objectives for this project are (1) conduct a review of current literature on filtration effectiveness and limitations of effectiveness at removing metals, pharmaceuticals, and other non-pathogen contaminants, which can serve as resources for humanitarian needs; (2) fabricate ceramic filters with varying pore content and size, and characterize and test to establish a baseline; (3) experimentally investigate effect of pore morphology and fabrication steps on the dispersion and distribution of silver nanoparticles in the filters.

Approach and Deliverables: The deliverables for the projects are: 1. An analysis of the effect of pore size and content on flow rate and water quality; 2. A comparative analysis of ceramic filters developed for maximized performance in relationship to the current control ceramic water filter.
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PSU Enterprise IT 1 Discussion Facilitation Chatbot Shaffer, Steven 0 0 3 1 2 3 0 3 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Large courses, especially lectures, are often difficult for instructors to engage students in meaningful conversations. Some courses use teaching assistants to help facilitate online conversation - however, the scale and cost can be prohibitive to use with all courses. This project is to develop an intelligent chatbot that can engage students in live conversation within online discussion forums. The goal is to use the bot to ask probing questions and provide feedback on responses within conversations based on topics relevant to the course discussion.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Enterprise IT 2 Classroom Activity Sensors Wheeler, Timothy 0 0 2 0 3 1 0 3 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Penn State has a tradition of experimenting with new designs for classroom spaces. One key challenge is understanding the impact that the classroom design has on course interaction. To help support the design of new spaces, classroom sensors are needed that can capture and track activities and provide associated data from within a classroom throughout a class period. There are products that can capture basic information about the number of people in a space - but the information is far too limited for this use. The goal is to have activity data that could differentiate between a students that are, for example, seated at a desk, moving about the room, or writing on whiteboard.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU eSportbike Team Electric Powertrain Integration into a 2015 BMW S1000RR Wheeler, Timothy 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Electric Powertrain Integration into a 2015 BMW S1000RR
eSportbike Team Penn State University – Spring 2019

Spring 2019 capstone design project proposal, electric powertrain integration. Students from the capstone design class will work alongside members from the eSportbike Team at Penn State – a recognized student organization dedicated to the design and electrification of high-performance motorcycles. Located in the Larson Transportation Institute on Penn State's University Park campus, the eSportbike team, under the guidance of advisors Tim Cleary, Eric Trainum, and Bryan Harper is currently involved in an electric vehicle conversion for a BMW S1000RR sport bike. The contribution of the capstone design team is a detailed integration plan and execution.
Using that integration plan, the capstone design will take ownership of system-level installations and minor fabrication projects that support those installations. Final deliverables include (1) battery system mounting design, (2) powertrain mounting design, and (3) installation of both the battery system and powertrain, which consists of an electric motor and motor inverter.
Project Scope
The team will develop a detailed integration plan for existing hardware, a battery system, electric motor, and inverter. They will develop critical support structures for these powertrain components while considering each component’s mechanical, electrical, and logical interfaces.
As part of deliverable (1), the integration plan, the team will address all interfaces and mechanical loading by generating system requirements. Then, the team will propose a schedule and task list addressing how each requirement will be met. For example: “The electric motor shall be rigidly mounted to the chassis of the motorcycle and have a deflection less than 0.1" when fully loaded.” The eSportbike Team and advisors will provide feedback via the Slack site (https://psuesportbike.slack.com/).
Deliverable (2), preliminary design, will detail the proposed integration solutions and allow a second opportunity to get feedback from the team and advisors. Solid models, drawings, and sketches are expected; but may not be ready for manufacturing.
Deliverable (3), detailed design, will build on the preliminary design by addressing customer feedback (eSportbike Team) and addressing any open issues. At this deliverable, drawings, schematics, simulations (FEA), and solid models are expected to be final and ready for manufacturing. This deliverable is complete when the team approves manufacturing of designed components.
Deliverable (4), manufacture mechanical parts and electrical harnesses.
Deliverable (5), assembly of the motorcycle.
Required Materials
The capstone design project will leverage existing hardware that was purchased by or donated to the eSportbike Team. During the project, the eSportbike Team retains full ownership of all existing hardware; and members of the capstone design team will not be permitted to remove components from the team workspace at LTI, without supervision from a senior member of the eSportbike Team. Existing hardware includes, but is not limited to the following:
- 2015 BMW S1000RR (requires written approval and supervision of lead advisor Tim Cleary)
- Parker GVM210-100 Electrical Vehicle AC Traction Motor
- Curtis 1239e AC Motor Controller
- EAS 3.6 V 60 A-h NCA Batteries (100 cells) (requires written approval and supervision of lead advisor Tim Cleary)
- Assorted Controls System Hardware and Wiring Harnesses
- Preliminary Battery Enclosure with BMS Control Modules
- Assorted Hand Tools and Shop Equipment in the LTI Garage
Since raw material needs are difficult to predict, the capstone design team will purchase their own stock and fasteners as the needs of the project evolve. The provided budget will allow the capstone team to dictate these purchases and receive materials within a timely fashion.
Core Deliverables
The capstone design team will be responsible for:
(1) Integration plan that includes system requirements
(2) Preliminary design: Present ideas in CAD and discuss proposed solutions to all requirements
(3) Final, detailed design: Show ready for fabrication detailed drawings of all parts/harnesses
(4) Fabrication
(5) Assembly
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Hershey, College of Medicine 1 Design of a biomechanical test setup for patella fracture fixation implants Szczesny, Spencer 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

This is part of a medical research study being funded by an orthopaedic implant company. Students will design and prototype mechanical test fixtures for physiologic loading of cadaver knees. The fixtures will assemble to our existing mechanical loading frame at Penn State Hershey. The design should accommodate cadaver specimens and withstand the large mechanical loads that are to be applied. The mentors/sponsors include a trauma surgeon and biomechanical engineer with experience designing and building these setups. The students will also gain an understanding of the implants that will be tested using the setup.

Background of overall medical research study: Historically, fixation failure and implant complication rates after patella fixation have been unacceptable, reaching 20-30% and reoperation rates have been no better (33-70%). Surgeons have struggled with poor patient outcomes, high rates of anterior knee pain and persistent functional impairment. Newer fixation strategies, specifically multiplanar plate fixation, have demonstrated improvements in patient reported outcomes, functional recovery and anterior knee pain when compared to more traditional treatment methods. Although not yet supported by published data, these results are also thought to result in lower reoperation rates. In order to expand upon these findings we propose a standardized, biomechanical comparison of this novel patellar plating technique with the traditional fixation strategy of cannulated screws and anterior tension banding.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Hershey, College of Medicine 2 Orthopaedic Surgery Gaming App Shaffer, Steven 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Students will create a fun and engaging software app that simulates an orthopaedic surgical and medical treatment. The mentor team includes an experienced orthopaedic surgeon and Professor, as well as a PhD in engineering with research software development experience. The team is interested in motivating students with diverse backgrounds to consider a career in orthopaedic surgery. For example approximately only 1 in every 10 orthopaedic surgeons is female, among the lowest in all medical disciplines. The software will represent a common orthopaedic scenario including the important decisions made for helping a patient recover from an injury or disease. The product will be designed in a manner that is ultimately broadly accessible to high school students.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU HMC Cardiopulmonary Perfusion Services Development of a mobile cart for our Centramag ECMO and heater/cooler unit. Kelly, Deb 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) is used to support patients with acute cardiovascular failure and/or acute respiratory failure. This is in both neonates, children and adults. This mobile cart will contain the Centramag ECMO control unit and pump head as well as heater/cooler unit. This will keep the devices safe and in close proximity to the patients bedside.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU HMC Dept of Obstetrics and Gynecology Biofeedback in the second stage of labor Shaffer, Steven 2 0 3 1 0 3 0 0 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The second stage of labor (from complete dilation of the cervix to delivery of the baby) can be exhausting and confusing. First time mothers who have epidural pain control lack the natural tactile feedback to ensure they are pushing in the right place and with adequate strength. Ineffective pushing can have serious consequences for both the mother and baby. Prolonged duration of the second stage of labor has been associated with poor neonatal scores, NICU admissions, infections, fetal/maternal trauma, and pelvic floor dysfunction.

Our team is proposing to use readily available real-time pressure monitoring of the uterus (via a Koala IUPC device) and simple audio cues to provide biofeedback: when the intrauterine pressure rises to a threshold pressure and duration, the mother will receive the feedback. We are inspired by previous use of biofeedback therapy in chronic constipation as well as general principles of operant conditioning.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Human Powered Vehicle (HPV) Human Powered Vehicle Wong, Tak Sing 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The team will finish designing and building the frame, steering, and drive-train systems for a human powered vehicle (HPV) to maximize performance. If there is time, the team will also design and build a fairing to improve the aerodynamics of the vehicle. In general, the goals of HPV are to go fast and also serve as a replacement for cars. As a result, the team will need to balance the competing goals of maneuverability and speed. The vehicle will compete in the ASME HPV competition in Michigan April 5-7. The team will also be responsible for writing the relevant parts of the competition report and clearly documenting their work. The team will continue the work that the fall semester team has started (see schematic). In this case, the vehicle is a recumbent bike. The photo shows the HPV from last year.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU IME Society PSIMES Mentoring and Job Shadowing Enrollment, Assessment and Matching Application Purdum, Charlie 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

PSIMES is the Penn State IME department alumni society, and two important annual activities to support students are our mentoring program (matching a student with an alum) and our job shadowing program (sending students to visit a company of interest to them to see how IE's perform in real life). These two programs are relatively new and are continuing to expand each year. They have similar base activities - communications of the program, enrollment of students and external constituents, matching of students with mentors or job shadow locations, monitoring of progress, and evaluation of results. Currently these two programs are run independently, with data collected via the IME Department website links, stored in spreadsheets, manually manipulated to analyze and prioritize, and tracked using multiple offline tools. Data storage is not optimal, communications can by cumbersome, access and visibility to team members is often suboptimal (using google docs), and history and sustainability are not really adequate.

We propose that a team of students address the needs of both programs (which are similar in nature, but specific in some aspects), develop criteria for a solution that can be shared between both programs where possible, analyze and assess appropriate tools, build the systems to support our needs, and develop documentation to sustain and modify it as needed in the future.

This will require work with some of the mentoring and job shadow team members, brainstorming, critical thinking, knowledge of tools and data bases, and testing to determine the solutions are appropriate.

Deliverables are documentation of the processes, tools to support ongoing needs, and documentation of their use and maintenance. This would be turned over to the PSIMES board for ongoing support.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Learning Factory 1 Sensor-enabled athletic shoes Bilen, Len 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The Internet of Things (IoT) has found its way into vehicles, home appliances, and other commodities. We would like to explore the use of sensors in athletic shoes, including those with 3D printed soles. Students will develop and collect data from at least two systems. The first will be a commercial athletic (e.g., running) shoe. The second will be a shoe with a 3D printed sole attached to a commercial upper. Students will embed and collect data from wireless sensors in both shoes. While early prototypes might just indicate whether the shoe is bearing weight or not, final prototypes should be more advanced (e.g., record data from an accelerometer).
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Learning Factory 2 Muscle measurement during exercise Bilen, Len 2 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Muscles undergo a number of transformations during exercise. The objective of this project is to quantify one of the ways that they change: volume. The team will design a sensor that can be worn around an arm, leg, or chest to measure how the circumference changes throughout an exercise session. The sensor should be self-contained (no wires dangling around). Ideally it reports data throughout the exercise session, but it could store the data for download later.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Medina Lab Development of a 3D Printed Acoustofluidic Device for Ultrasound Particle Tracking Szczesny, Spencer 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

This project seeks to modify the design and manufacture method of a 3D printed acousto-fluidic device used to monitor, guide and track particles under ultrasound. The multidisciplinary team will have the opportunity to explore materials design to control the acoustic properties of the device, develop 3D-printable sample chamber modules, and will be tasked with adding temperature control to the device. The team will have the opportunity to improve/modify an existing prototype, or to re-design the device from scratch as necessary. Specific deliverables include: (1) production of prototype device composed of an acoustically transparent polymer; (2) multi-component design that allows for flow through of a sample, while being easy to disassemble/reassemble; (3) ability to control the device temperature from 25 - 40C (stretch goal of 4 - 50C).
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU MNE 1 Design and testing of a torque and force measurement apparatus to simulate hip fracture implants VonLockette, Paris 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Surgical treatment is the most common approach to address pertrochanteric and femoral neck fractures, commonly referred to as “hip fractures”. There are many implants available for stabilization of the fracture. Regardless of implant, the options to fix the fragments are typically cephalic lag screws (Figure 1 A-C) or helical blades (Figure 2 A-C). Maintenance of the correct position of the fragments during blade or screw insertion to maximize stability and avoid displacement during healing is challenging in unstable fracture patterns. Anti-rotation wires or pins are often used across the fracture, but low insertion torque of the device is desirable. Further, implant design is thought to play a role in resistance to failure of fixation during the healing process. It is the goal is to design, build, and test an instrument that measures the insertional torque and axial forces generated during implantation of commonly used and commercially available cephalic screws and helical blades of varying design.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU MNE 2 Novel Method to Measure Metal Flow in Casting: Bringing Industry 4.0 to the Oldest Manufacturing Process via 3D Sand-Printing McComb, Chris 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 3 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The overall goal of this senior capstone research project is to design and demonstrate a novel approach to build a fundamental bridge between the oldest manufacturing process (sand-casting) and newest manufacturing process (3D Sand-Printing - 3DSP, i.e. Additive Manufacturing- AM) via novel wireless in-process monitoring system.

The motivation for this project is derived from two unsolved fundamental manufacturing problems for several decades in the most widely employed and the oldest manufacturing process, i.e. traditional sand-casting: (a) turbulent flow and (b) feeding defects. Over 70% of all metal castings produced every year employ traditional sand-casting with an average scrap rate of 35%, where 87 % of all the scraps are caused by turbulent flow and feeding defects in the mold design. While temperature measurements in castings with limited design complexity could aid in understanding the rate of solidification, there has been very limited success in the measurement of real-time melt flow velocity which is critical to the fundamental understanding of turbulent entrainment. There is only one reported method which can only qualitatively visualize 2D melt flow in simple mold designs using expensive x-ray radiography.

This team will develop a radically different approach to study the fundamentals of 3D casting-hydrodynamics by correlating real-time melt flow and solidification conditions in difficult to access locations in molds to theoretical predictions (e.g. temperature-time profile). This team is tasked with correlating real-time experimental results during casting with predicted processing conditions (from metal flow simulations) to evaluate the robustness of 3DSP models. This project will design and develop a novel 3DSP smart molds to measure real-time melt flow velocity and rate of solidification.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU MNE 3 Wearable Devices in Industry 4.0 Bilen, Len 3 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

As a member of this team, you will have the opportunity to investigate advanced wearable devices capable of measuring physiological and neurological signals. You will test and validate the utility of wearable devices to gather such data as heart rate, galvanic skin response, movement, and brain signals in order to determine human cognitive and physiological states (such as engagement in a task or stress). You will need to select appropriate wearable and passive ambulatory assessment techniques that provide high enough resolution and accuracy to correctly measure worker biomarkers.

The two major deliverables for this project are: (1) A validated system of wearable devices and (2) An appropriate workflow to analyze multiple data streams.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Outreach to Elementary School Interactive Educational Exhibits for the Elementary Science Curriculum Ounaies, Zoubeida 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 3 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Overview: Interactive educational exhibits for Pennsylvania elementary science curriculum for elementary students in Pennsylvania

This project requires the development and design of one or more interactive educational exhibits to support the public school elementary science curriculum. An interactive educational exhibit is a stand alone display found in a children’s museum that enables children to learn through conceptual or experimental interaction. The project must use the State College Area School District or the Pennsylvania elementary science curriculum as a guide. Local elementary teachers will serve as “consultants” to the team to respond questions about age appropriate language and conceptual knowledge, for example.

This project seeks to translate conceptual and experimental knowledge into instructional and curricular research materials and experiences for K-5 instruction.

Approach and Deliverables: The deliverables for this project are: 1. Design and development of 1-2 educational interactive exhibits in support of the elementary science curriculum; 2. User manual to facilitate assembly/disassembly of the exhibit for use by elementary classroom teachers.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU RERC on AAC Using Avatar and Chatbot Technology to Teach Active Listening Skills Shaffer, Steven 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The Spring 2017 Learning Factory team of Judge, Levine and Bakthisaran developed a working text-based chatbot that could be used by Penn State students to practice Active Listening skills ( e.g., engage in a "conversation") with a chatbot. Additional information is available at
https://rerc-aac.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Chat-Bot-FinalReport.pdf
and
https://rerc-aac.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/ChatBot-Poster.pdf .

The challenge(s) for the team in Spring 2019 are to

1) create an attractive front-end interface for the "user" ( Penn State students) that would display the text from the existing chatbot data-base (Judge et al, 2017) , and provide information on the success of the Penn State students in making use of key active listening skills

2) create an easy to use back-end user interface for faculty to add "conversations" and active listening scenarios to the chatbot database

3) based on the text displayed in #1, implement an avatar ("talking head") for the front-end interface seen by the Penn State student

The goal is that the web-based chatbot will be used in teaching activities with students at Penn State and across the country
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Reservoir Studio Designing DIY Kits to Produce Life-Saving Materials in Response to the Global Water Crisis Ounaies, Zoubeida 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Overview: Water-related diseases cause millions of deaths annually around the world. Lack of safe drinking water, pervasive disease, and substandard sanitation are known as the global water crisis. Among the most active means of responding to the global water crisis include the production and distribution of point-of-use ceramic water filters manufactured from local materials in communities in need. These point-of-use ceramic water filters are designed as low-cost, first responses and temporary solutions to provide clean water in remote areas after natural disasters. The active component in these filters is colloidal silver that attracts and renders inert microbes and other waterborne diseases with 99.9% effectiveness. The colloidal silver is the most expensive element in the filters and is not readily available in communities of need. Reducing the cost to produce the filters would enable wider distribution and improve the health of millions of people annually.

Objectives: The objectives for this project are: (1) research and design DIY approaches to producing colloidal silver and colloidal copper from scrap or inexpensive sources; (2) test the effectiveness of the DIY materials in ceramic water filters in comparison to conventionally-produced water filters enhanced with colloidal silver; and, (3) design an image-based instruction book to accompany the DIY silver and copper kits for end users regardless of culture or language (think step-by-step instruction books used to assemble IKEA furniture or LEGO building sets).

Approach and Deliverables: In order to make the process more affordable, one solution is to develop DIY fabrication approaches to produce colloidal silver inexpensively from repurposed and local sources. Other materials such as copper, which is abundantly available, inexpensive, and potentially effective against waterborne diseases, could also be produced, which would help millions more people annually through this low-cost approach to filtering clean water. In short, we need to develop an inexpensive DIY approach to producing colloidal silver and colloidal copper to expand the range of affordable responses to the global water crisis.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Reservoir Studio and Potters Water Action Group - CLAY MIXER Portable Ceramic Water Filter Production Facility: Clay Mixer Design and Production Ounaies, Zoubeida 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 2 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Overview: Water-related diseases cause millions of deaths annually around the world. Lack of safe drinking water, pervasive disease, and substandard sanitation are known as the global water crisis. Among the most effective and affordable means of responding to the global water crisis includes the production and distribution of point-of-use ceramic water filters manufactured from local materials in communities in need. These point-of-use ceramic water filters are designed as low-cost, first responses and temporary solutions to provide clean water in remote areas after natural disasters. Established water filter production facilities have permanent equipment in place that allow them to produce hundreds of water filters each week. Educational workshops, demonstrations, and the establishment of new facilities require similar equipment, yet it must be portable and also function at the same level as the production-quality equipment. With the ongoing need for ceramic water filters for these workshops and demonstrations, portable facilities are no longer a luxury but rather are now a necessity. Portable production equipment will also facilitate testing and production of ceramic filters in any location. The goal of this project is to design and build a portable clay mixer, that is also functional and built at little to no cost.

Objectives: The objectives for this project are: (1) research requirements and functions of mixers as part of ceramic water filter production; (2) re-design as a portable, low-cost mixer to augment the needs of a portable water filtration facility; and, (3) demonstrate its functionality.

Approach and Deliverables: The mixer should mix about 20-25 lbs of wet clay, enough to build 3 filters.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Reservoir Studio and Potters Water Action Group - KILN Portable Ceramic Water Filter Production Facility: Kiln Design and Production Ounaies, Zoubeida 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 3 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Overview: Water-related diseases cause millions of deaths annually around the world. Lack of safe drinking water, pervasive disease, and substandard sanitation are known as the global water crisis. Among the most effective and affordable means of responding to the global water crisis includes the production and distribution of point-of-use ceramic water filters manufactured from local materials in communities in need. These point-of-use ceramic water filters are designed as low-cost, first responses and temporary solutions to provide clean water in remote areas after natural disasters. Established water filter production facilities have permanent equipment in place that allow them to produce hundreds of water filters each week. Educational workshops, demonstrations, and the establishment of new facilities require similar equipment, yet it must be portable and also function at the same level as the production-quality equipment. With the ongoing need for ceramic water filters for these workshops and demonstrations, portable facilities are no longer a luxury but rather are now a necessity. Portable production equipment will also facilitate testing and production of ceramic filters in any location. The goal of this project is to design and build a portable kiln, that is also functional and built at little to no cost.

Objectives: The objectives for this project are: (1) research requirements and functions of kilns as part of ceramic water filter production; (2) re-design as a portable low cost kiln to augment the needs of a portable water filtration facility; and, (3) demonstrate its functionality.

Approach and Deliverables: A kiln that can fire 3 to 5 full-size filters at 866 degrees C, with approximate dimensions of 3’ x 3’ x 3’.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU SEE 360 Aggregate Planning at Berkey Creamery Purdum, Charlie 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Over the last 150 years, the Creamery has been an important Penn State landmark and a world leader in dairy production and food science. The students will help in formalizing the production and inventory processes that occur as a part of the ice-cream production at Penn State's Creamery to aid in the implementation of an ERP-like tool for the Creamery's inventory management. This will include:
- Data collection and analysis of plant production for all recipes.
- Formalizing recipes and quality assurance processes.
- Aid in the implementation of management tools for inventory control and supply planning.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Stuckeman Center for Design Computing and SEDTAPP Augmented/Virtual Reality for Enabling Interactive Tabletops for Computer Aided Design McComb, Chris 0 0 1 2 3 3 0 0 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Design is increasingly permeated by immersive technologies such as Virtual Reality. Such technologies bear the potential to expand designers’ capabilities for modeling shape beyond the two dimensions of computer screens and the intermediation of keyboard and mouse. Recent developments in VR technology, namely regarding head mounted displays such as HTC Vive and Oculus Rift, have rendered fully immersive experiences to become consumer grade and mainstream. However, there is a market beyond fully immersive experiences as suggested by the increasing focus on Augmented Reality. Therefore, alternatives semi-immersive technologies such as interactive tabletops are worth exploring.

The objective is to enable the use of an existing interactive tabletop as a design tool, by improving the existing prototype towards a better semi-immersive experience, and by developing an interface between such hardware and CAD applications such as Rhinoceros and Solidworks. The interactive tabletop should enable holographic visualization of 3D models and the use of touch and/or mid-air gestures for the exploration and manipulation of such models. The developed interface should be integrated with its fully immersive environment counterpart provided by an HTC Vive.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Transformative Biomaterials and Biotechnology Lab Development of an Extrusion System for 3D Printing Orthopedic Biomaterials Medina, Scott 1 0 0 0 3 0 3 3 3 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Project Overview:
Bone is the second most implanted tissue after blood; however, significant challenges remain in providing suitable materials for grafting. The current gold standards, auto- and allografting, possess superior osteoregenerative potential but are limited by donor site morbidity and potential disease transfer and immune response, respectively, as well as limited supply. Synthetic, biodegradable composites offer a potential alternative, necessitating the further development and optimization of these materials.
Bone is a composite composed of calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite-like) particles (60-70 wt%) within an organic protein matrix. Investigation of the structure of native bone has confirmed the presence of strongly bound citrate-rich regions that serve to stabilize apatite nanocrystals within bone, resulting in its distinctive mechanical properties. Translation of this understanding into material design has been among the core goals of Dr. Jian Yang’s lab, resulting in the development of the citrate-based crosslinked biodegradable polyester, poly(octamethylene citrate) (POC). Citrate, a natural metabolic product in humans, is capable of forming strong interactions with incorporated hydroxyapatite (HA), similar to the natural interactions in bone. Combined with the elastomeric nature of the POC polymer, composites of POC/HA display enhanced mechanical and biological properties compared to commonly utilized biomaterials such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA); however, POC composites still display disadvantages.
Ideal materials for orthopedic tissue engineering should be readily processable into complex shapes in order to provide clinically relevant devices as well as patient specific implants. POC has traditionally failed in this area due to its poor processability (as compared to PLA), requiring lengthy evaporation of solvents from POC/HA solutions to create clay-like composites which must be compacted and thermally cross-linked to achieve the final product, which is limited to simple shapes such as cylinders or blocks. Recently, our lab has developed POC based polymer/composite formulations capable of rapid self-setting, resulting in functional orthopedic materials with potential in injection molding and 3D printing; however, an adequate extrusion system to accomplish efficient printing of these materials is currently lacking. Design and fabrication of such a system will enable a new generation of citrate-based orthopedic devices with excellent potential to improve clinical orthopedic treatment and patient outcomes.

Deliverables:
1. An extrusion device capable of being mounted on a commercial Makerbot Ultimaker2 3D printer with temperature and extrusion rate control.
2. Polymer composite mesh samples capable of mechanical testing (tensile and ball burst) as prototypes for orthopedic bone wraps.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Quaker Chemical Corporation Honing of Engine Cylinder Liners DeMeter, Ed 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Project Description:
Honing is an abrasive machining process that when used in the machining of engine cylinder liners and coatings produces a precision surface with desired form and texture. Traditionally, cast iron cylinder liners are used and represent the workpiece material often being honed. There is currently in the automotive industry, an increasing interest and use of hard, wear resistant thermally applied coatings used in place of the conventional gray cast iron liners. Such hard coatings offer lighter weight to the engine, as well as increased toughness and wear resistance. However, such hard coatings also are more difficult to machine and present increasing challenges in the fine boring and honing operations performed. This project will focus on the development of a honing test using a vertical CNC machining center, and on the study of the lubrication and performance provided by three metalworking fluids in the honing of gray cast iron and 316 stainless steel.

Project Objectives:
1. Using honing tools (supplied by Quaker), and a vertical CNC machining center, develop a honing test and establish machining conditions suitable for the honing of conventional gray cast iron liners as well as 316 stainless steel.
2. Using the honing test developed, study the performance of three water based honing fluids (supplied by Quaker) in the honing of gray cast iron, and stainless steel. Honing performance to be measured by determination of G-ratios (rate of metal removal/honing stone wear), as well as assessment of the honed surface quality produced.
3. Conduct microscopic examination of the honed surfaces as well as the used honing stones to further assess the performance effectiveness of the metalworking fluids used.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Roundwood Capital, LLC Glamping Trailer McComb, Chris 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Design a glamping tent, pop-up trailer. Use a utility trailer (single or double axle) as platform, ideally 6.5' x 16' with a 5' ramp that has an expandable bed so the functional size when expanded is 19.5' x 16' with a 6.5' x 5' bump out (the ramp) or 19.5' x 21'. The floor should be wood or composite and the canvas tent should be easily raised and lowered by one person. There should be a king size bed with natural wood log legs and headboard that's collapsible. Other mandatory features would include rain cover over top of canvas tent, Mosquito screen windows and easy-opening front entrance, built-in LED lights inside and outside, ability to level the tent over uneven terrain, solar-power with battery storage and 40 gallon clean water tank. Other desired features would include solar powered refrigerator, hot water shower, small wood stove vented to the outside, and composting toilet or other toilet system.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Schlumberger 1 Coiled tubing unit spotting and alignment study DeMeter, Ed 0 0 0 0 3 1 3 2 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

For safe and smooth coiled tubing operations, an extremely important step is to position and set up the related equipment properly. Such equipment spotting often involves a range of measurements, including distance, height, and angle measurements, to achieve optimal spoolability and operability subject to well site constraints.

Conventional ways of measuring distance and/or angles are suboptimal and inefficient.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Schlumberger 2 Coiled tubing drum air lock study Wong, Tak Sing 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Coiled tubing operations are based on a continuous coiled tubing pipe that’s wrapped on a cylindrical drum. there are many layers of pipe wrapped on the drum, with many wraps within each layer.

Before an intervention job, the drum often needs to be filled with fluid before the actual pumping job can be started. Such draining and filling process may take significant time and effort; part of the difficulty associated with such processes is related to the air lock existing in the drum, which may introduce significant air lock pressure (a few hundred to one thousand psi). Also, air may exist in the drum during pumping, which may hinder the process by increasing demand on pump pressure and create more chances of air bubble bursting and cavitation damage. Air lock inside a coiled tubing pipe wrapped on a drum is not well understood.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Schlumberger 3 Injector head gripper block optimization study Ray, Asok 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Injector head is at the core of a coiled tubing unit. The main function of an injector head is to provide the amount of pulling and snubbing forces that are required for a coiled tubing string to run in and pull out of hole, under tough operating conditions. Such pulling and snubbing forces can reach substantial levels, such as 160,000 lbs. of pulling and 60,000 lbs. of snubbing, for modern heavy-duty injector heads

These forces are achieved from static friction between mating metal surfaces in the vertical direction, arising from traction forces between them in the horizontal direction. The two metal surfaces in contact include the surface of coiled tubing itself and the surface of mating gripper blocks which is often grooved to increase the coefficient of friction; Existing gripper block designs are far from being optimized.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Schlumberger 4 Electrically Driven Dry Chemical Metering with an Auger Wheeler, Timothy 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The oilfield meters many dry chemicals such as guar with an auger. Typically, a calibration factor is used to correlate the rotational speed of the auger to the mass delivery rate. This factor varies between chemicals and can only be found by conducting a physical test. Therefore, every new chemical requires a manual calibration. With the auger now driven by an electric motor and speed controlled by a VFD the project would aim to use the electrical signals to calibrate the auger to the correct mass delivery rate.

The deliverables of this project will be a small lab scale test system to measure the electrical input to an auger. At least five different dry powders should be studied. The results of this study should determine if it's possible to measure mass rate based on the electrical input measurements. It should also evaluate if the different chemicals can be distinguished from each other based on how the electrical measurements differ.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Shanghai Jiao Tong University User-friendly software for fast simulations of multi-modality medical imaging Szczesny, Spencer 1 0 2 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 3

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used in diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy dosimetry. However, most MC simulation engines are too complicated to use, especially for multi-modality (e.g. PET, SPECT and CT) applications. Furthermore, MC simulations are often time consuming, which prevents their usage in many clinical scenarios and limits the potential application in generating large amounts of data for machine learning. The objective of this project is to develop a software platform that is user friendly (does not require the medical imaging expertise ) and enables faster Monte Carlo simulations for multi-modality medical imaging than existing simulation engines.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Shanghai Seven Bridges Robotics Inc. The optimal cutting means for robotic lawn mower - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH SJTU Cheng, Bo 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

The optimal cutting means for robotic lawn mower

The robotic lawn mower is increasingly popular as an alternative to the noisy pushing lawn mower for families and bossiness. The cutting is traditionally through a high spinning wheel with blades attached to the outer perimeter. Seven Bridges robotics Inc. has developed a proprietary design, where blades are attached to the inner edge of an annular ring spindle to improved safety.

The design has been field tested, however, the optimal design is needed for best cutting results and structural integrity. In this project team should finish:
1. For the safe blades design, structure stress analysis should be performed using FEA tools, such as ANSYS to for maximum speed light-eight design
2. field testing for best cutting results, including RPM, and different structure and blades arrangement
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Shell 1 Shell Eco-Marathon Car 1 - Exterior Neal, Gary 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Join the Shell Eco-Marathon Car Design Team! Learn about fuel efficiency innovation and put those principles into practice as you redesign and build the car of the future. This Urban Concept car will push the limits on weight, aerodynamics, and energy efficient technology, while taking advantage of industry-standard small engine and gear design. Students are tasked with completing the build of a new car body and powertrain. The car will compete in the April 2019 at the Shell Eco-Marathon in Sonoma, California with over 100 other schools across North and South America. Students on the project will have the opportunity to travel to Sonoma and compete in the EcoMarathon. This project is perfect for those who enjoy working on cars and want to #makethefuture in energy. https://sites.psu.edu/pennstateecomarathon/
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Shell 2 Shell Eco-Marathon Car 2 - Interior Neal, Gary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Join the Shell Eco-Marathon Car Design Team! Learn about fuel efficiency innovation and put those principles into practice as you redesign and build the car of the future. This Urban Concept car will push the limits on weight, aerodynamics, and energy efficient technology, while taking advantage of industry-standard small engine and gear design. Students are tasked with completing the build of a new car body and powertrain. The car will compete in the April 2019 at the Shell Eco-Marathon in Sonoma, California with over 100 other schools across North and South America. Students on the project will have the opportunity to travel to Sonoma and compete in the EcoMarathon. This project is perfect for those who enjoy working on cars and want to #makethefuture in energy. https://sites.psu.edu/pennstateecomarathon/
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Shell 3 Shell Eco-Marathon Car 3 - Powertrain Neal, Gary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Join the Shell Eco-Marathon Car Design Team! Learn about fuel efficiency innovation and put those principles into practice as you redesign and build the car of the future. This Urban Concept car will push the limits on weight, aerodynamics, and energy efficient technology, while taking advantage of industry-standard small engine and gear design. Students are tasked with completing the build of a new car body and powertrain. The car will compete in the April 2019 at the Shell Eco-Marathon in Sonoma, California with over 100 other schools across North and South America. Students on the project will have the opportunity to travel to Sonoma and compete in the EcoMarathon. This project is perfect for those who enjoy working on cars and want to #makethefuture in energy. https://sites.psu.edu/pennstateecomarathon/
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Siemens Industry Inc. 1 Large Silo Bin Mapping Lehtihet, El-Amine 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Students will be expected to generate bin mapping solution that utilize multiple measurement points to calculate the bin volume. Students will have to account for factors such as various material composition, cone up/down conditions, and sidewall buildup.

The expectation for this project is to generate a mathematical solution that accounts for the following variables (number of fill points, number of draw point, angle of repose, bin shape, number of measurement points, the measurement point configuration, silo size and allowable % error). Siemens will expect a full report outlining various configurations and demonstrating the robustness of the mathematical model. To account for various materials students will be expected to account for angle of repose as a variable within the mathematical formula so that can be changed from case to case. This model is expected to optimize the number of measurement points based upon allowable error.

A sample problem we expect to be able to solve is the following. Please note that this is only a sample.

A customer has a 50ft diameter cylindrical silo that is 100ft tall. There are 2 fill points that the top of the silo with 3 points at the bottom where material can be drawn from. The silo is used to store flour with a angle of repose of 30%. Based on the end customers feedback they can accept a 10% error in the measurement. Make a recommendation on the optimal number of measurement points.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Siemens Industry Inc. 2 Digitalization of the Learning Factory: RFID for Personnel and Asset Management Part II McComb, Chris 0 0 2 3 0 3 0 1 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

With proof of concept work completed in Fall 2018 for both capturing data and posting it to the cloud, as well as retrieval from the cloud and display/reporting, this phase of the project will include further solution development/refinement and systems integration. Specifically, the selected team will need to:

• Refine RFID data capture solution for scalability across the Learning Factory
• Install RFID data capture solution
• Implement visualization and reporting solution on the cloud platform

This project will include both design and hands on installation work.

RFID hardware along with the cloud operating system are to be Siemens. Mindpshere (cloud) licenses and some RFID hardware have been donated to the Learning Factory, other hardware may need to be acquired using project funds.

All design work, final reports from prior teams working on this project are available.

Success will look like authorized Learning Factory person being able to navigate to Mindsphere on a mobile device, tablet or PC and see the relevant usage information for the Learning Factory.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Solid Dynamics, LLC 3D Printing Electronic Optimization Wheeler, Timothy 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Over the past year and a half, Solid Dynamics, LLC has designed and built a proprietary 3D printing system for consumer use in the State College area. The 3D printing system we've developed could benefit from design optimization for electrical heating elements and mechanical components within the system. The purpose of this project is to showcase the current operating state of Solid Dynamics' 3D printer and allow students to identify areas of weakness and improve on the current design through the application of their engineering know how.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Southern Safety Products, LLC Development of a residential fire safety product that is designed to provide 1 hour of breathable air in a confined space should egress become impossible. Wheeler, Timothy 0 3 0 0 1 2 3 0 3 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Currently there exists a gap in residential fire safety products between alarm and egress as there is still an estimated annual fire/smoke related death numbering 2500-3000 with a ratio of 8:1 smoke to fire attributable deaths. I am in development of a product that address this gap intended to provide a habitable breathing environment in a confined space for the period of one hour in order for fire/EMS personnel to execute a rescue and reduce the number of annual home fire deaths.
The Smoke Shield system is a self-installation product whose operation is designed to supply at least an hour of breathable air in a closed and dedicated space (i.e. bedroom closet) in the event that egress is not possible. The system contains an independent power supply with intake and exhaust fans that direct contaminated air through a filter system removing carbon products produced by hyperventilation as well as house fire breakdown release including but not limited to: carbon dioxide and monoxide and cyanide. The system includes an integrated circuit that serves an adjacent room sensing system that initiates operation of the recirculation pipeline as well as a manual starting function. The sensing system also includes a visible LED strobe light to alert rescue personnel to the location of the victim. The system is powered by 10 D-cell batteries or an optional rechargeable 12V battery with an integrated inline battery charger. The power unit is designed to supply constant power in a static system for the sensing unit and power status indicator with sufficient residual power to supply the activated unit for a period of at least an hour once commissioned. The integrated circuit is equipped with a low voltage alarm to indicate the need for batteries to be exchanged or unit to be recharged. The is anticipated to be 18 x 6 x 6 inches enabling the device to be hung anywhere in a designated space. Based on management’s intended design, the device should recirculate the temporary emergency space twice per minute (for a standard 64 cubic foot closet) based on the design rating of 139 CFM. This system is small and able to be installed in any closet or small space with easy to follow directions.
The objectives intended for the team are to further the design, function, integrity and efficiency of the unit to prepare for market launch upon product completion. Currently I have developed a rudimentary prototype and performed initial beta testing with early product functionality and capability evaluation. I also have employed a senior engineering student to begin CAD development which will be supplied to the team to aid in further refinement and development. The unit will require significant testing once prototype is presented and agreed upon but I have the upmost confidence in the Penn State program constituents to deliver a complete and fully functional product.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Structural Preservation Systems, LLC Interactive Manpower Resource Tool - Specialty Contractor Shaffer, Steven 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Develop an app to accurately draw in employee name and skill information from a database, and be able to distribute personnel across multiple projects to match the needs of each independent project site. Each project will have a noted requirement for resource labor quantity and skill set. This tool would be used by a variety of personnel with varying levels of computer experience and expertise - so the program should be user-friendly for all levels of computer literacy.

The intended "look & feel" of the app would ideally be a drag and drop application in which each individual is a separate resource block and the block can be assigned information tracking the individual - in terms of skill sets, technical certifications, current title, and tenure within the company. Once resources are distributed to their assigned projects, the program should be able to compile the total count, skill specific count, and expected manpower histogram for the project, and combination of all projects.

Once functional, this tool will help the business team properly allocate manpower resources in an efficient and effective way, running reports to relay information across the organization, and helping to communicate and project business needs across multiple local branches.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Sustainable Health Enterprises (SHE) Banana Fiber Extractor Redesign - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH SJTU Cheng, Bo 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Many machines exist to extract fibers from banana pseudostems with from semi to automated. All have relatively similar designs and preparation requirements for the stem. They are generally effective for fibers for crafting or that will see significant chemical or mechanical post processing. Extraction of good quality fibers for use in applications for absorption requires inserting and removing stems slowly (45-60secs/ piece). This generally can produce 10-12kgs of dried fiber per 8hrs with a 2-person team. Lower quality fiber can be produced faster (15-20 sec/piece) but this results in more non fibrous material or “pulp” to transport and remove downstream, reducing yield by up to 25%. This has created the need for an improved extractor machine, or overall process, which can yield > 30kgs of fiber per day while maintaining quality.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
The Boeing Company 1 Simulated Mars Landing, Resource Discovery and Delivery System Design - Team 1 Wheeler, Timothy 0 0 3 0 0 1 3 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The Boeing Company and Lockheed Martin will partner to challenge three teams composed of Mechanical, Electrical, and Computer Engineers to design, build, and test a system of vehicles to land on Mars, navigate rough terrain, and assist with resource discovery and delivery. The goal of this project is to demonstrate the power of collaboration at industry, workforce, and system levels.

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the moon. Since then, companies, industries, and even nations have worked together to explore beyond once-imagined limits and bounds, encouraging our modern society to “look up.” Today, the world’s eyes are set on Mars and the long list of challenges associated with it. For example, on August 6, 2012, the Curiosity rover landed on mars to characterize the Martian climate and geology. More recently, the InSight lander designed to study the planet’s interior successfully touched down on November 26, 2018.

A common theme among these remote landings are the “7 Minutes of Terror” in which the vehicle enters Mars’ thin atmosphere at hypersonic speed and slows to a gentle touchdown on the surface. Adding to the challenge of these entry, descent, and landing phases (EDL) is the eight minute travel time of radio signals from Mars to Earth. This requires complete automation throughout the entire process – one small mistake, and billions of dollars could be lost. To be interstellar pioneers, we must leverage system interoperability and workforce collaboration. When it comes to space exploration, United Launch Alliance (ULA), a joint venture between Boeing and Lockheed Martin, has served as the nation’s leading launch services provider. The ULA is combining Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner and Lockheed Martin Atlas V rockets for the return of US based human spaceflight. Additionally the ULA is leveraging technology from the Boeing Delta IV and Lockheed Martin Atlas V rockets in the design and development of the new Vulcan Centaur launcher. By combining “the best of both worlds,” Boeing and Lockheed Martin can offer an impressive solution.

Similarly, three teams of students will work collaboratively to design, build, test, and demonstrate a Mars system composed of a lander, a rover, a robotic arm, and relevant sensors. One team will develop the rover to navigate the Mars surface, one team will develop the robotic arm and sensors to functionalize the rover, and one team will develop the lander to safely touchdown the system. By employing systems engineering principles, all teams will collectively design the interfacing components and functions to produce a fully integrated solution.

The teams will demonstrate their system’s capabilities to Boeing and Lockheed Martin sponsors at the end of the semester, on the day of the Learning Factory Showcase, by completing a mock landing and resource delivery and discovery mission.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
The Boeing Company 2 Simulated Mars Landing, Resource Discovery and Delivery System Design - Team 2 Erdman, Mike 0 0 3 3 0 3 2 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The Boeing Company and Lockheed Martin will partner to challenge three teams composed of Mechanical, Electrical, and Computer Engineers to design, build, and test a system of vehicles to land on Mars, navigate rough terrain, and assist with resource discovery and delivery. The goal of this project is to demonstrate the power of collaboration at industry, workforce, and system levels.

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the moon. Since then, companies, industries, and even nations have worked together to explore beyond once-imagined limits and bounds, encouraging our modern society to “look up.” Today, the world’s eyes are set on Mars and the long list of challenges associated with it. For example, on August 6, 2012, the Curiosity rover landed on mars to characterize the Martian climate and geology. More recently, the InSight lander designed to study the planet’s interior successfully touched down on November 26, 2018.

A common theme among these remote landings are the “7 Minutes of Terror” in which the vehicle enters Mars’ thin atmosphere at hypersonic speed and slows to a gentle touchdown on the surface. Adding to the challenge of these entry, descent, and landing phases (EDL) is the eight minute travel time of radio signals from Mars to Earth. This requires complete automation throughout the entire process – one small mistake, and billions of dollars could be lost. To be interstellar pioneers, we must leverage system interoperability and workforce collaboration. When it comes to space exploration, United Launch Alliance (ULA), a joint venture between Boeing and Lockheed Martin, has served as the nation’s leading launch services provider. The ULA is combining Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner and Lockheed Martin Atlas V rockets for the return of US based human spaceflight. Additionally the ULA is leveraging technology from the Boeing Delta IV and Lockheed Martin Atlas V rockets in the design and development of the new Vulcan Centaur launcher. By combining “the best of both worlds,” Boeing and Lockheed Martin can offer an impressive solution.

Similarly, three teams of students will work collaboratively to design, build, test, and demonstrate a Mars system composed of a lander, a rover, a robotic arm, and relevant sensors. One team will develop the rover to navigate the Mars surface, one team will develop the robotic arm and sensors to functionalize the rover, and one team will develop the lander to safely touchdown the system. By employing systems engineering principles, all teams will collectively design the interfacing components and functions to produce a fully integrated solution.

The teams will demonstrate their system’s capabilities to Boeing and Lockheed Martin sponsors at the end of the semester, on the day of the Learning Factory Showcase, by completing a mock landing and resource delivery and discovery mission.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
The LiveFirst Company PawProof Kitchen Waste Bin Erdman, Mike 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 3 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Project Scope
We have redesigned the standard kitchen trash can specifically for pet owners. We have a general concept that we think can be significantly improved upon. Attached are links to the designs we currently have. https://a360.co/2tx04wW and https://a360.co/2IBOTYx
We would like the Learning Factory team to improve upon them with priority being the bell shaped cylindrical one, however, they should be looking to incorporate the following properties into the product:
Pet proof
The can should be extremely tip resistant
Should be secure or be physically impossible for an animal to get into because of the shape or design
Lid needs to be secure but also be easy to use in that the market research suggests that users will want hands free operation.
Options for a lid redesign or replacement is a major point of this project.
Ease of Use/Capacity
Should allow user to empty the trash without lifting the bag out
Should allow user to use 90% of the recommended bags capacity
Recommended bag size should be 20gal bag see attachment for bag dimensions
Should have a simple mechanism or design feature that keeps bag from falling into can
Cleanability
If moving forward with multi sectional design, then base and lid should be able to fit in the dishwasher or sink
Material needs to be easily wiped clean.
Aesthetics
Would like to explore options in regards to an aesthetically appealing design with no visible pedals, hinges or other mechanisms. Looking for a nice chic look that appeals to the more affluent consumer.
Manufacturability
Should have few moving parts
Lowest manufacturing cost should be a major consideration
Different manufacturing processes should be explored
Testing
In the product marketing campaign we would like to make certain claims in order to differentiate our product from the standard trash cans on the market. We would like to get the following information regarding our product:
Tipping force required to topple the can over used to infer the maximum size and weight of the dog that the product should be able to withstand. We will rate the can for certain size pets as we move the product line forward.
Any fire resistance information for the recommended manufacturing material.
Any medical benefits that we could claim attributed to not having to lift the bag out. Maybe regarding back problems or the elderly.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
TMP Manufacturing Company, Inc. 1 Improving standard shipping Cannon, Dave 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Review our current shipping methods and improve them to reduce shipping cost and damage.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
TMP Manufacturing Company, Inc. 2 Improving how we build reusable crates for shipping show boxes Cannon, Dave 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Review our current reusable crates used for shipping our product to trade shows and improve them to be more user friendly, reduce freight cost and damage.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
TMP Manufacturing Company, Inc. 3 Tangent Bender Bilen, Len 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

To update the Yaskawa MP2300 plc program to bend metal on some while ignoring others that are used just to allow the correct forming.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
TRUMPF (China) Co., Ltd. 1 Design and implementation of Metal Dust Pretreatment Device - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH SJTU Cheng, Bo 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

During production, metal dust may cause serious harm to human’s body. This project aims at making a device to treat harmful metal dust. The machine’s size depends on the actual situation. This device should be as simple as possible and shouldn’t be too expansive.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
TRUMPF (China) Co., Ltd. 2 Cloud-based Cutting Feature Recognition and Intelligent Solution system - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH SJTU Cheng, Bo 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Image-Recognition technology makes a great contribution to our lives, now we’d like to apply it to manufacturing. This project aims at building a Cloud-Based system to recognize 2D cutting features from pictures and provide analysis. The system should be composed of a set of cameras and a processor.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
TRUMPF (China) Co., Ltd. 3 Design and Analysis of Metal Folding Structure - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH SJTU Cheng, Bo 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Metal folding structures, or we can call it bending structures, are useful in many fields. Now we want to analysis their performance and find some other useful folding structures.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
UnisBrands LLC 1 In-house 3D Printer Filament Recycling Device Wong, Tak Sing 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 0 3 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

We currently do not have equipment to do this ourselves and must outsource this job to outside companies. We would like to bring this technology under our own umbrella.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
UnisBrands LLC 2 Automated Laser Cutter for 3D printed Shoe Sole DeMeter, Ed 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 1 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

We would like to automate our current process which consists of first cutting extra material that is left after adding the rubber outsole with a bandsaw. The next step is sanding the sole to a fine finish. This overall process is time consuming and inaccurate. Using a laser cutter to either have preset sizes or ‘Smart” sensor such as an Xbox connect sensor to detect depth to determine the cut. This will bring our process to the next level.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
UPMC Cole Surgery Services Work Flow, Resource, Space and Information Optimization Rothrock, Ling 0 0 0 3 3 0 2 1 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Approximately 6,000 times per year, a patient is scheduled, authorized, medically cleared, arrives, registers, receives preoperative preparations, is staged, operated on for various reasons using varying instruments and supplies, recovers, is discharged to home or another location, receives a bill and receives follow-up care from the UPMC Cole surgery department, the business unit that is the focus of this proposed project. There are many inputs into this process and many people involved. Information on scheduling, efficiency and outcomes is essential.

This is a high level description of what happens approximately 250 weekdays per year at UPMC Cole. But, beyond these scheduled cases, there are frequent unexpected, emergent cases that happen at any time of day and any day of the week. So, while environment is mainly one of a predetermined and managed schedule , these unexpected cases cause stress on the system, people and efficiency of the business unit.

UPMC Cole proposes to the Penn State College of Engineering Learning Factory, a service optimization project for this business unit that looks at how and where we attempt to perform surgery thousands of times in a year with the best outcomes and experiences for our customers and staff.

We would like to discuss the technical disciplines that should be considered for such a project.

We look forward to engaging with the Learning Factory and we are sure that the learning with flow both ways should students be interested in our proposed project.

Regards,

Ed Pitchford
President and Senior Executive
UPMC Cole
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
UPMC Susquehanna Muncy 1 Sustaining Improvement Through Clinical Microsystems Team 1 Cannon, Dave 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

Research and review clinical micro-system concepts and sustaining improvement.

Aim: Improve patient outcomes and process performance based on unit-implementation of a high performance management system.

Measures:
1. Patient outcomes, cost of care, and staff satisfaction aligned with system mission.
2. Clinical process reliability, efficiency, safety, timeliness, patient-centeredness, and equity aligned with outcome goals.
3. Measures of adoption: state of implementation of each secondary driver by unit, pace of unit implmentation, qualitative data from leader observation.
4. Balancing measures.



In summary, we are looking to aid the Unit Director in creating conditions within the unit to effectively oversee quality control and improvment initiatives that maintain and improve system performance.

Scoville R, Little K, Rakover J, Luther K, Mate K. Sustaining Improvement. IHI White Paper. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Healthcare Improvement; 2016.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
UPMC Susquehanna Muncy 2 Sustaining Improvement Through Clinical Microsystems Team 2 Cannon, Dave 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

Research and review clinical micro-system concepts and sustaining improvement.

Aim: Improve patient outcomes and process performance based on unit-implementation of a high performance management system.

Measures:
1. Patient outcomes, cost of care, and staff satisfaction aligned with system mission.
2. Clinical process reliability, efficiency, safety, timeliness, patient-centeredness, and equity aligned with outcome goals.
3. Measures of adoption: state of implementation of each secondary driver by unit, pace of unit implmentation, qualitative data from leader observation.
4. Balancing measures.



In summary, we are looking to aid the Unit Director in creating conditions within the unit to effectively oversee quality control and improvment initiatives that maintain and improve system performance.

Scoville R, Little K, Rakover J, Luther K, Mate K. Sustaining Improvement. IHI White Paper. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Healthcare Improvement; 2016.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
US Silica Mapleton Plant Ergonomic evaluations and improvements for a Silica Processing plant Freivalds, Andris 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

US Silica is a silica manufacturer, with one of its many plants located in Mapleton Depot, Pa. The site includes mining, processing, and loading rail and truck for transportation of silica.

Due to a complex operation and an aging workforce, US Silica would like to complete a study on the ergonomics at the facility. The plan would be to review the highest injury rate tasks or operations at the site, with videotaping of each process. The group would then be challenged with designing equipment in order to reduce the physical strain on employees at the site.

The overall objectives:
• Reduce handler’s efforts be reducing repetitive motions and decreasing forces of lifting, pulling, & pushing
• Reducing risk of musculoskeletal disorders (i.e. awkward postures); and
• Increase productivity.

Deliverables:
• Conduct ergonomic risk assessments in compliance with OSHA Standards;
• Conduct and analyze surveys to employees;
• Assessment of both current & redesigned process; and
• Report out to EHS department.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Volvo Penta AB 1 Fast Charging System - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH CHALMERS Martin, Anne 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 2 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Background:
Since batteries are constantly improving in both performance and cost, also marine electric propulsion systems are starting to become commercially available. There are already electric outboards and electric powertrains for displacement vessels on the market. Commercially there are some cities that are investigating water taxis and other short distance vessels for transporting goods.
Large ferries and private yachts are investigating hybrid systems for maneuvering inside the harbor.
Norway has several ferries crossing the fjords electrically, equipped with charging stations on each side. One of the problems for electric commercial transports on water is the high power fast charging. A marine environment is much more challenging due to corrosion, conductivity, grounding, safety, handling etc. Volvo Penta are developing a passenger ferry for the city of Gothenburg that only makes short stops, and this requires a safe and reliable fast charging system. The socket and plug is already decided, however the rest of the system remains.

Task:
• Study the environmental challenges in a marine environment
• Investigate how other companies have designed their charging systems to find out what works
• Design a manually handled fast charging system as a CAD model
• System designed for IP69K and physical touch safety systems for socket and plug
• Build a 1:4 scale demonstrator

Preliminary sketch /idea
The basic idea is to have the socket installed in the deck of the vessel/boat due to the thick and heavy cables, however this can be changed.
The plug will be land based why some kind of device is needed to provide the plug to the seaman.
The plug will start as a manually operated device, however in the future it might become robotized.
The electrical safety systems will be designed by Volvo Penta, however its necessary with physical safety systems that prevents touching the contacting surfaces.
Also the plug and socket must be protected against water / rain and high pressure cleaning.
Material choices should cope with IP69K

Students:
The project is in cooperation with Pennsylvania State University. The project team will consist of three students from Chalmers and three students from Penn State. Students from both Universities will be represented on two projects for the Fast Charging System. Each University will lead one project each.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Volvo Penta AB 2 Foldable Foiling System - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH CHALMERS Martin, Anne 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Background

Foiling has been around since early 1900, and there have been some commercial, military and private vessels presented over the years. Foiling is a great technology in reducing water resistance making boats move fast with less energy. Another important advantage is the fact that the vessel cruises above the waves making the transportation much more comfortable. The last ten years the interest in foiling have exploded in the surfing and sailing industry, and 2017 the AC50 catamaran showed up with an impressive 50 knots performance. Foiling kite and windsurfing are reaching speeds previously unheard of, especially in moderate wind conditions. Electric foiling surfboards are rapidly growing, and the advanced composites allow radical designs combined with low weight.
Foiling is also highly interesting for electric power boats due the smaller need of energy / power, and during 2018 Candela http://candelaspeedboat.com/ plan to launch their first consumer product, a 25 knots and 3 hours bow rider.

The main reason that foiling has never become a big success so far has been the need of continuously controlling the speed vs. lift making it complicated. Also, the foils are vulnerable when hitting floating debris which could potentially become dangerous when traveling at high speed compared to a normal hull which usually glides over e.g. a log. Another problem with foiling for large boats is that when you cruise at low speeds the foils generate a big drag, and also increases the need for deep water. Lifting the boat out of ware it’s also tricky since you either first has to remove the foils, or use special lifting equipment and unique stands. Also, the propulsion system has to follow the depth of the foiling system exposing propellers and transmissions.

Tasks
• Learn to work in a global product development team
• Study the challenges in a marine environment regarding hull design and propulsion
• Study how other companies have designed their foiling systems to find out what works
Global Capstone Projects with Chalmers, Penn State and Volvo Group
• Design a foldable / retractable foiling system including the transmission and propulsion as a CAD model
• Design a foldable semi-foiling system including the transmission and propulsion as a CAD model
• System designed for a planning mono hull 30 foot boat with one engine / motor
• Build a 1:4 scale demonstrator of both systems
The project is in cooperation with Pennsylvania State University (Penn State). The project team will consist of three students from Chalmers and Penn state, respectively.

Students
The project is in cooperation with Pennsylvania State University (Penn State). The project team will consist of three students from Chalmers and Penn state, respectively.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Volvo Truck Smart Oil-filter mounting tool for robot use in assembly - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH CHALMERS Martin, Anne 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Background:
Collaborative robots are entering the market rapidly. Applications for these kinds of robots are often intended to be the same kind of mounting/de-mounting operations as today are performed by humans. That implies that tools used for those operations shall sometimes be used by humans and sometimes be used by the collaborative robots. This will require a complete new type of control and sourcing of actuators in the tools as well as also addressing quite complex ergonomic questions.

Task:
This is about develop a functioning prototype of a mechatronic tool for grasping and lifting new Volvo D13 oil filters from a pallet and mount (enter thread and spin on, no tightening) them. The tool shall have a removable battery, powering an on-board computer for control and communication, an electrical motor and potentially, a grasping device.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) Wireless Valve Position Indicator Bilen, Len 0 0 1 2 0 3 0 0 0 3 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) is a bi-county, public utility in Maryland that was established in 1918. For 100 years, WSSC has served the communities of Prince George’s and Montgomery counties providing life-sustaining water and water resource recovery services to individuals, families and businesses. The WSSC water distribution system is comprised of many pressure zones controlled by isolation valves. Proper positioning of these valves play a critical role in the operation of the distribution system. Isolation valves inadvertently left in an incorrect position can cause issues within the system such as difficulty balancing flow and pressure as well as unwanted draining of water standpipes and towers. Position indication of critical valves such as isolation valves is needed, not only at the valve box but also remotely via wireless communication. In order to monitor and indicate the position of critical valves, a retrofit valve monitoring devise is needed within a valve box. The devise will provide visual indication of the valves position once the valve box cover has been removed. The position of the valve will also interface with WSSC via cellular and SCADA networks. The team will perfect a concept design to be ready for fabrication and work through a real-time fabrication process with WSSC’s fabrication facility. This design-build project’s end goal is to produce a prototype to fit within a valve box without modification to the existing valve or valve box.
Company Name Project Title Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Well Master Corporation Downhole Bumper Spring for Plunger Lift Systems - GLOBAL PROJECT WITH SJTU Martin, Anne 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 2 0 1 0

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Well Master has a Bottom Hole Spring Assembly (BHSA) product line that is used at the bottom of natural gas wells and absorbs the impact from falling plungers. This equipment has an integrated check valve that requires a certain pressure to bypass the valve and allow flow through it. Customers often require different pressure settings of these assemblies and our current method of adjustment is to change out wave springs inside the device that have differing spring rates. This is done in our factory in Golden, CO and must be done at time of shipment. Once assembled the spring rate cannot be changed. See Website for product overview: https://wellmaster.com/product/rhino/

This project's focus is to design a new BHSA that can be adjusted by our sales persons or by the customer in the field to their desired pressure setting. After they have selected their ideal pressure, there needs to be a simple method to lock everything in place to prevent the setting from changing after installation into the gas well. Wells are often 8,000’ deep and require an expensive process to remove them, so taking the assembly back out after installation is not feasible.

Some of the guidelines for the project are:
- Use commonly available products that are inexpensive to procure or make
- Design must be scalable to larger and smaller diameters
- Common tools like wrenches, screwdrivers and hammers will be used to set the desired pressure
- Design cannot come apart after installation, and if a failure occurs, it will fail in a safe and still operable condition
 
 

About

Our mission is to help bring the real-world into the classroom by providing engineering students with practical hands-on experience through industry-sponsored and client-based capstone design projects. Since its inception, the Learning Factory has completed more than 1,800 projects for more than 500 different sponsors, and nearly 9,000 engineering students at Penn State University Park participated in such a project.

The Learning Factory

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802