Current Projects

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Selecting Projects

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Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Aetna Develop Process Flows and Staffing Standards for Network Account Management Functions Purdum, Charlie X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The Aetna Network Management Department in the PA/DE/WV market is responsible for all contracting and provider relations activities for all providers in the market. The Network Management team would like to have process flow charts and staffing standards developed for the Network Account Managers (NAMs). The NAMs are responsible for maintaining the relationship between Aetna and the health care providers, including resolving various provider issues and maintaining provider information in various databases. The flow charts will be used as training guides for on-boarding NAMs hired into the Network Management Department and the staffing standards for measuring productivity and workload planning.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Andritz, Inc. Simulation Modeling To Schedule Multiple Foundry Processes Purdum, Charlie X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

Andritz, Durametal Refiner Plates, is the premier U.S. manufacturer of chrome white iron and hardenable stainless steel wear parts for the pulp and paper industry. The primary product, a refiner plate, is a pie-shaped segment with teeth on one side. These segments fit into refiners which are used to make products for pulp, paper, fiberboard, and agricultural refining applications. The ISO 9001:2015 certified manufacturing facility in Muncy, PA, houses a no-bake sand molding facility and a precision grinding shop.

Our production process begins in the foundry where refiner plate segments are cast. Castings then go through a rough grinding and heat treat process. Once this is completed, castings are assembled as a circle in the Precision Grind Shop. In the Precision Grind Shop, the circles undergo additional grinding and machining operations.

Students will be responsible for modeling the current heat treat process using production planning simulation software such as Simio. The current model will be used a benchmark to compare how potential process changes will impact the scheduling and production flow of these operations. Process changes could include rearrangement of equipment, product flow variation, alternate scheduling scenarios, etc.

Deliverables
Simulation model of current process and models of proposed changes
Analysis of potential changes vs current process
Final technical report
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Bechtel Power Corporation Molten Salt Reactor Plug-n-Play Heat Exchanger Wang, Donghai X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Bechtel is one of the most respected global engineering, construction, and project management companies. Since 1898, we’ve completed more than 25,000 extraordinary projects across 160 countries on all seven continents. Our expertise includes power generation, renewables, airports, bridges, highways, hydroelectric power, ports, rail, sports venues, urban development, mining and metals, liquefied natural gas, offshore and onshore oil and gas, petrochemicals, pipelines, tanks, telecommunications, water, environmental cleanup and remediation, decontamination and decommissioning, waste processing and disposal, and government facilities management. A leader in the development and application of emerging engineering and construction technologies, some of Bechtel’s first-of-a-kind, signature projects include Hoover Dam, England-France Channel Tunnel, Hong Kong International Airport, British Columbia to Central California Pipeline, Curtis Island LNG, Riyadh Metro, and many others. In addition to being the contractor of choice for a wide variety of power generation facilities for more than 60 years, Bechtel has led the emerging nuclear technology markets. Examples include the design and construction of the first U.S. reactor, EBR-1 (Experimental Breeder Reactor), world’s first commercial nuclear power plant, Dresden, world’s first HTGR (High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor), Peach Bottom, Canada’s first nuclear plant, NPO, and the first U.S. nuclear plant in 25 years, Watts Bar Unit 2. The raison d’etre of an emerging technology is to build a better “mousetrap”. The proverbial mousetrap in nuclear power is a smaller, modular, safer, and advanced (Gen III+ and Gen IV) reactor. These small and advanced reactor technologies include Pressurized Water-Cooled Small Modular Reactor, High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor, Molten Salt Reactor, Liquid Metal-Cooled Fast Reactor, and Pebble Bed Modular Reactor. These advanced reactor technologies use various cooling approaches including water, gas, liquid metal, and molten salts. This proposed project is to evaluate the heat exchanging needs of a Molten Salt Reactor. The goal would be to select and size a specific heat exchanger that could be paired with any of the industry leading Molten Salt Reactor designs. The project team will perform the following tasks: 1) Determine bounding Molten Salt Reactor design parameters; 2) Select a heat exchanger type that would best fit the application; 3) Study material needs and limitation of a heat exchanger; 4) Develop an automated sizing calculation with adjustable plug-and-play capabilities. The 2017 Fall project will culminate in a 3D CAD drawing and 3D print out of the heat exchanger.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Bosch Rexroth Corporation Design and Prototype a Tool for Inserting O-Rings into a Housing Campbell, Rob X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Overview
(4) O-Rings are inserted into the bottom of a housing during the assembly of a hydraulic valve. This process is currently done manually and relies on a skilled operator. Often this process takes too long, or the difference between assembly operators is substantial causing line balancing or quality issues .

Scope
Design and Prototype a cost effective and reliable tool to insert O-Rings into a housing. The tool must be easy to reload O-Rings and prevent jams.
Stretch Goals:
1- The Tool can swap between different O-Ring materials (same dimensions, just different color)
2- The Tool provides feedback to a software system (LabView) confirming correct insertion (Ex. Pressure drop via pneumatic actuation)
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Bridgestone Americas Coarse Road Noise Test Cell Safety Catanach, Wallace X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Bridgestone Americas, the worlds largest tire and rubber manufacturer, operates test laboratories world wide. At it’s Akron, OH facility specialized tests for NVH (noise, vibration and harshness) are tested indoors in multiple cell location. These test cells consist of tire air borne noise measured in a semi-anechoic chamber and a coarse road facility to measure structure born noise/vibration.
The Coarse Road Noise (CRN) cell is an open cell having man doors on both sides allowing pedestrian traffic to walk through the cell when a test is being run. There is no shielding/guarding that would keep debris from dislodging from a tire during testing. In order to maintain a safe lab environment, we would like to investigate the best method, including cost, to manage the pedestrian safety of this test cell.
There are several options that could be investigated:
1. Currently, one of the man doors has an electronic lock to grant key card access during off hours. This door is open from 7am to 5pm. The other man door is not electronically controlled. Is it cost effective to add electronic control to the other man door and lock the room out completely during test operation?
2. Could an expanded metal (or other) cage be designed over the test fixture to keep debris out of the lab environment and keep pedestrian traffic away from the test fixture during operation?
3. Other?


We would like to evaluate the above options based on effectiveness, lab efficiency and safety to determine the best method to implement. We are only requesting a design proposal for this project and not a complete physical implementation of the solution.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Capital One Machine Learning for Capital One Verbanec, Alan X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Capital One continues to emerge in technology while providing financial services to customers. We continuously look for opportunities to enhance on existing technology by introducing new ideas and frameworks. Recently, Capital One has turned a major focus to Machine Learning (ML). By investing heavily in ML, Capital One plans to create extremely accurate models to predict behavior, helping us become more efficient, accurate, and secure. We are continuously looking for ways to incorporate ML in our ecosystem.

The Capital One project is focused around ML and presenting data in a useful and friendly way. The project consists of the team absorbing what ML really is, how it is implemented, and what use cases Capital One can take from it. We can establish ML around determining loans, credit card lines, fraud purchases, etc. The possibilities are endless for Capital One, but the team will first start off with using ML to create a model for recognizing logos. The team will then build off of their findings and incorporate ML in more useful ways for credit cards.

In addition to the Machine Learning aspect, the team will leverage API’s to send and retrieve data. On top of that, the team will create a presentable UI to display data and outputs from the ML model. The project will be open to the team to determine what type of libraries they’ll use for ML; however, we will offer up suggestions. We will challenge the team to create the UI in React. We will use Version Control with GitHub and manage the project with the Agile Framework along with week to week meetings. We will utilize the first meeting to provide resources, discuss the project and team goals, and include design thinking as needed.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Central PA SCI Support Group Safe Snowboard Binding for Triple Amputee Hayes, Daniel X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Overview: The purpose of this project is to create:
1) safe snowboard bindings that allow a man with bilateral above knee amputations and right above elbow amputation to safely and easily slip into and out of these bindings while wearing his prosthetic legs;
2) simple, secure mechanism that permits attachment and release of bindings with right hand;
3) maximum board control on sloped surface;
4) shock absorbing features to protect user's hip joints.
The intended user is currently working with a snowboard maker who will assist the team in fabricating parts. The team will also have last semester's prototype as a basis for designing an improved prototype. The team will be provided with the snowboard and overboard (with holes where the bindings will be attached.) Deliverables: One working snowboard that can be used in time for a national disabled snowboarder's competition in November 2017.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Coca Cola Intelligent networked vending machines - GLOBAL PROJECT with Belgium Campus Erdman, Michael X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Description: Companies are redeveloping their bricks-and-mortar stores in the face of rival companies. Whilst vending machines are often derided as being unimaginative, basic and temperamental, increasingly brands see an opportunity for customer engagement, measuring stocks and much more. The focus of this project to find a low cost solution to connect over 300000 vending machines to the internet and putting them into the IOT space. In certain countries data rates are high and internet is not readily available at all locations. The challenge for this project is to find a device and network agnostic way to connect the vending machines to the cloud.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Corning Incorporated Discovering Ultra-Clean Cullet Crushing Technology Manogharan, Guha X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Background: Corning Incorporated utilizes glass cullet in most of its glass melting operations and typically introduces 10%-30% cullet into its glass batch recipes. Cullet definition: Scraps of recycled, broken and/or waste glass gathered for remelting purposes. Corning’s cullet typically starts out as a thin but large cross-sectioned sheet of glass (i.e. 1mm x 1500 mm x 1500 mm). The large sheet is mechanically crushed to the desired the desired size where the largest particles are ~2mm and the smallest particles are on the order of 100 microns. The current mechanical crushing processes consist of mainly metallic components (i.e. chutes, rolls, plates, jaw crusher) which results in introducing tramp sources of unwanted metal into the cullet. Tramp definition: stray metallic contaminants whose presence is undesirable to the quality of the final product. Corning uses magnets and ceramic lined parts to minimize tramp metallic contaminates but it does not remove all of the tramp sources. Corning is interested in producing cullet in which the crushing process contributes zero tramp sources. The tramp sources Corning is most interested in completely removing from the cullet are Iron (Fe), Chromium (Cr) and Nickel (Ni). With Corning’s current crushing technology the tramp concentrations are as follows (Fe) is ~3ppm, (Cr) is <1ppm and (Ni) is <1ppm. The goal for each element post crushing is zero ppm.

Objective: To research, identify and evaluate potential glass crushing methods/technologies which could produce cullet where the crushing process contributes zero tramp sources of Fe, Cr and Ni. “Think out of the box ideas”. As an example, could sound waves or ultrasonic sources be used to break and crush the glass into cullet?

Deliverables: Final report detailing the research, testing and evaluation of all potential “crushing” technologies which produce cullet with 1) zero tramp sources of Fe, Cr, Ni and 2) approximates the particle size distribution. Following the research portion of the project, choose 1 or 2 of the “best” crushing technologies for evaluation. Evaluation of the “crushing” technologies will occur by crushing/testing the actual glass/cullet (to be supplied by Corning Incorporated). The final cullet does not have to replicate the particle size distribution (PSD) shown (for reference only) but the new crushing technology needs to produce a cullet PSD which falls in the range of 100 microns to 2000 microns and contain zero ppm of Fe, Cr and Ni.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Dresser-Rand 1 3-D Printed Rotating Components for Aero Test Rig Simpson, Timothy X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Overview
DRESSER-RAND, A Siemens Business is one of the world’s leading suppliers of high performance centrifugal compressors for the oil and gas industry. DRESSER-RAND’s goal is to provide our clients with turbomachines that minimize power consumption while maximizing throughput. Despite advances in analytical tools, DRESSER-RAND continues to depend heavily on our aero test rigs to validate novel designs and configurations. However, the cost of rig parts can be a major concern. Therefore, DRESSER-RAND continually seeks ways to apply advanced manufacturing processes and alternate materials to reduce the costs of our rig test programs. Based on preliminary studies, 3-D printing of non-metallic components could provide significant savings if the parts could have sufficient strength to survive under test rig conditions.

Objectives
The objective of this project is to determine: (a) what materials can be used to form rotating aerodynamic components in the test rig; (b) if additional structural members (i.e., wire mesh, carbon fibers, etc.) can be added to provide increased strength; (c) develop the printing procedures that must be applied; and (d) assemble the cost estimates for select rig components.

Deliverables
Deliverables from the project will include: (1) a detailed report addressing all aspects of the work completed; (2) details on the printing process recommended to build the parts from alternate materials; (3) details on the structural members added to provide strength; (4) details on the part costs for those components investigated by the team. NOTE: The final scope of the project, including a list of the components to be studied will be finalized when the team visits the Olean facility.

Expectation of the Team
Team membership will include engineering majors. The team must maintain regular contact with the project mentor via e-mail and phone calls. The team is also expected to visit the D-R Olean facility to become more familiar with D-R’s products and processes. The project scope will be refined during the Olean visit.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Dresser-Rand 2 Impeller Overspeed Tooling Manogharan, Guha X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Background
Impeller overspeed testing is a critical inspection step of multi-stage centrifugal compressors produced and sold by Dresser-Rand, A Siemens Business. The impeller is a key component in the centrifugal compressor that compresses the gas through rotation. In operation, the impeller can rotate at speeds in excess of 20,000 rpm, with impellers ranging from 9.5” to 66” in outer diameter. To ensure the integrity of the impeller and its manufacture, the impeller undergoes an overspeed test prior to unit assembly. The test is conducted at a speed 15% above the Maximum Continuous Operating Speed (MCOS) of the compressor. To complete the test custom tooling is required to mount the impeller to the test rig. Each impeller has different geometry; currently this requires a large number of unique tooling. In an effort to reduce the cost of manufacture and manufacturing cycle time, Dresser-Rand is investigating alternate methods of overspeed tooling design.

Project Objective
The objective of this project is to develop variable bore overspeed tooling for Dresser-Rand DATUM compressors. This tooling would allow for a range of impeller and reduce the quantity of tooling required. The team will need to become familiar with the critical parameters (or CTQ’s) for overspeed tooling design, and understand the current methods being used to design and fabricate this tooling. The team will then propose alternate designs and investigate the potential impact of the alternate designs on the both the manufacturing and mechanical performance of the tooling. Time-permitting, the team will construct a proto-type of the tooling using their proposed method.

Deliverables
The deliverables from the project include a final report detailing the results of the investigation, drawings / schematics of the proposed tooling design and, if completed, a proto-type of the tooling.

Expectation of the Team
The team should include mechanical and manufacturing / industrial engineers. The team also will be expected to stay in regular contact with the project mentor via e-mail and weekly phone calls.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
FedEx Services Location Service using Bluetooth Low Energy Bilen, Lennart X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

FedEx is looking to sponsor a small group of students to prototype a location service using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE). The primary goal will be to develop a service that can locate a package handler inside a facility with the resolution of a dock door or pick and delivery vehicle. A stretch objective will be to send and receive data from upstream systems and provide the package handler with a "trailer number" The team will be provided with an Aruba Beacon and FedEx package handler device running Android OS.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
FirstEnergy Corporation 1 Personal Protection Equipment(gloves) used in high-voltage applications Kimel, Allen X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

The electric utility industry relies daily on high grade Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) to keep their trained physical workers safe from any type of electrical contact while performing maintenance on high voltage systems. The most common used piece of PPE is the rubber glove which has to be worn anytime work is being performed on electric lines. The glove is capable of protecting against electric shock up to approximately 17,000 volts.
While the standard glove has been an effective safety tool, it is an expensive tool and subject to periodic testing which obviously adds cost to this specific item. Additionally, the glove comes in various sizes but isn’t really custom fitted to any one individual. It’s bulky, hot in the summer and not the most comfortable glove to wear. Currently any gloves deemed damaged are thrown in the dumpster without any consideration to recycling or reuse.
The safety culture in the electric industry dictates that every precaution be used insuring the quality and integrity of the PPE. FirstEnergy employs multiple tests on each piece of PPE annually to provide a level of confidence needed to our employees. Over 300 investor owned electric utilities in the U.S. use similar PPE.

The objective(s) of this project is the following:
1. Identify the true cost of current PPE gloves (initial, testing, waste, etc)
2. Design a new glove that is better fitting and recyclable. (The glove should not have any seams and made of at least two colors to assist when performing visual inspections)
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
FirstEnergy Corporation 2 Evaluating the use of 3D printing for replacing old test fixtures Simpson, Timothy X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

FirstEnergy / BETA Laboratory tests and repairs old analog electronic modules for electric companies and service providers. Some of the older modules have plastic grommets that electrically insulate test jacks and the grommets are no longer available or supported by the original OEM. These grommets have cracked due to age and replacements are needed. FirstEnergy (FE) test personnel have been able to borrow grommets from other modules, but backup supply is running very low, and FE is evaluating alternative options to make a replacement part.

In this project, we seek a team of engineering students that will help us evaluate the use of 3D printing to replace these old grommets. We are willing to invest in a 3D printer to manufacture replacement parts on site as needed; however, there are internal debates about which type of printer to buy, what type of material to use, the cost of 3D printing each part, etc. Therefore, we are asking the team to deliver the following:
1) Evaluate common 3D printing technologies for fabricating small to medium-sized plastic replacement parts in reasonable quantities and timeframes.
2) Develop a workflow to replace an existing part with a 3D printed part.
3) Implement the workflow and replace the existing grommets with 3D printed replicas using 2-3 different 3D printing processes (e.g., material extrusion, material jetting, vat photopolymerization).
4) Test and evaluate the 3D printed replicas in a BETA Laboratory module.
5) Identify the most promising 3D printing technology and fabricate a set (50-100) of replacement grommets. Delivery of fabricated set no later than 10-15-17.
6) Develop a cost model for the selected 3D printing process and estimate the cost and payback period for purchasing a specific make/model of that type of 3D printer.
7) Document the workflow and provide detailed step-by-step instructions for implementation of the 3D printer at BETA Laboratory.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Flowserve Corporation Abrasive-Corrosive Liner Attachment Kimel, Allen X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Flowserve is a world leading pump manufacturer that is continuously seeking new ways to improve the products that are provided to our customers and remain competitive in a very aggressive market. In the chemical processing market, more and more applications are seeing corrosive/abrasive applications, which result in very low product lifetime.

Flowserve is interested in non-metallic solutions to this problem, as metallic pumps require more complex processing to produce and do not necessarily provide total protection from either abrasion, corrosion, or both modes of damage in the field.

The main material to be investigated is Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE), which shows excellent abrasion and corrosion resistance. Flowserve wishes to modify existing pumps made from ductile cast iron to use this material as a liner insert. However, the material is notorious for not being able to be secured to the working surface of the pump.

The student team is tasked with designing a method to attach test coupons of UHMWPE to ASTM A395 Grade 60-40-18 ductile cast iron, and then test their designs. Flowserve shall provide the plastic to make test coupons out of, but the student team will need to determine what methods (mechanical, chemical, or otherwise) will be needed to provide maximum stability of the liner in shear and tension.

A series of testing events will be held throughout the semester to gather data and optimize proposed designs. Each event will use a tension testing machine and impact testing apparatus to determine maximum tension and shear resistance of the proposed solution. These events will be held once a month at Penn State and witnessed by Flowserve.

Throughout this project, students will need to exercise their engineering judgment and intuition as they investigate this application. The students will present their results, conclusions, and successful designs to Flowserve.

Project deliverables include determination of 'best' design based on engineering criteria from project data and appropriate references, a final report detailing conclusion with supporting engineering principles, and any engineering or simulation data used in the project.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Ford Motor Company Motor-Pump Maintenance Apparatus Design Manogharan, Guha X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Maintenance of equipment is a crucial process when dealing with operations, and is very time sensitive. Anytime a piece of equipment needs serviced or repaired, production comes to halt and clock begins ticking; the longer the repair, the more costly it is to the company. Currently, there is a motor-pump assemble on certain press lines that requires maintenance from time to time. The issue is that the process is very timely because the maintenance team must bring in mobile cranes to remove the assembly. The reasoning behind this is that there is not enough clearance to use the overhead crane and an apparatus. The process then becomes very involved and restricts production for days at a time.

After evaluating the current maintenance process, determine a more efficient process that will reduce the amount of time and cost for servicing the motor-pump assembly. Ford will provide the necessary dimensions and restrictions for the analysis. Using the results from the analysis, the students will need to develop a maintenance process for serving the assembly as well as a rigging apparatus to remove the assembly from the press. The design and process much meet industry and corporate standards. Additionally, Ford is looking for a scaled prototype of the apparatus and maintenance process to demonstrate the solution at the Senior Design Showcase.

Deliverables:

Determine a more efficient maintenance process that will reduce the amount of time and cost for servicing the motor-pump assembly.

Design an apparatus and process for removing and servicing the motor-pump assemble.

Create a scaled prototype of the apparatus and motor-pump assembly to demonstrate how the process works.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
General Motors 1 Wall Thickness Quality Loss Function- Crankshaft Moore, Jason X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Quality loss function for impact of wall thickness to pre and post grinding form to avoid “bulging” of sealing surfaces

Description:
-Enough wall thickness is needed to avoid influencing the seal surface by drilling and by tapping. Also, drill/tap first followed by grinding can also create a collapsed surface
-Removal of the fastened flywheel bolts is known impact oil seal roundness upon release of the clamp load

Benefit:
-Improve oil seal roundness
-Allow mass reduction loss function to be utilized to minimize wall thickness

Deliverable:
-For a ground oil seal surface with typical geometry/thread: The wall thickness needed to avoid a change in the oil seal roundness.
-For grinding over an existing subsurface hole, the wall thickness needed to avoid a change in the ground surface roundness.

-Oil seal surface diameter must remain round to 10 microns. As the wall thickness is decreased, eventually the seal surface will begin to respond to the drilling/tapping forces. Also, after the fastener is installed, it’s removal will also result in a shape change. What is the relationship between change in surface roundness as a function of the wall thickness?
(See attached image)

Material Needed:
-Steel and nodular cast iron coupons
-Propose to cut flange end from scrap iron & steel cranks for reuse
-Appropriate steel and cast iron industrial drill/tap set (with spare) and production intent machining parameters (speeds & feeds)

Equipment:
-Programable drill, ideally small CNC with thru spindle coolant
-Measuring equipment such as indicator, ideally a small cylindrical CMM
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
General Motors 2 Throughput Improvement Process Benchmarking Cannon, David X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Description:
-Research and Benchmark Manufacturing Throughput Improvement Processes (TIP) and associated tools in Industrial environments with Automotive focus ( Vehicle, Stamping, Engine, Transmission, Casting, etc.)

Benefit:
-Adoption of best practices will support improved productivity, efficiency and asset optimization.

Deliverable:
-Throughput Improvement Process overviews by OEM, and Shop Type (Vehicle: Body, Paint, General Assembly, etc.; Powertrain: Machining, sub-Assembly, Assembly, etc.). Focus to be people, process, technology :
-Methods/Tools/Systems/Heuristics used for Bottleneck Department, Machine, and Productivity loss identification
- Key metrics tracked (Overall Equipment Effectiveness, etc.)
-Associated team constituents (Industrial Engineers, Manufacturing Supervisors, Maintenance Team Leader, etc.)
-Associated training methodologies, content, approach.
-Time architecture (meeting structures, participants, frequency, leadership support, etc.)
-Results achieved by implementation of TIP, by OEM and by Shop Type.
-Recommendations
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
HarbisonWalker International, Inc. Carbon Bonded Refractory Brick Emissions – Test Method Development Kimel, Allen X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Background:
HarbisonWalker International (HWI) is the largest supplier of refractory products and services in the United States. A key market segment served is by HWI is the Steel Industry which relies on Magnesia-Carbon and Alumina-Magnesia-Carbon bricks used in steel ladles. These compositions contain carbon additions as it is not wetted by slags. The carbon can block slag penetration thereby minimizing the damage it causes to the brick in service. These carbon-containing ladle bricks are held together using cured organic resins. These organic resin gives the refractory brick high strength when cured at 175 C and leaves behind a high carbon content (~50% by weight) to the brick in service. This in turn gives the refractory brick good slag resistance at high temperatures of 1600 C. When a ladle containing these bricks is preheated at the customer site prior to initial use, the organic resin and its solvents volatize and decompose giving off strong odors that are a nuisance, and in high concentrations, may present a hazard to health. Other binders are being evaluated as alternatives to the current resin binders, but they will have their own unique emissions during heating.

Project Objective:
The objective of this project is to develop a test to identify and quantify the organic vapors that are produced during the post-cure heat treatments of refractory bricks containing various binder systems. This test will be used to determine the effectiveness of alternative binder systems that are being developed to reduce the amount of nuisance and or toxic vapors produced during the heat treatment processes that occur at the customer site prior to usage.

Deliverables:
Using the test method developed, characterize cured brick samples provided by HWI. Write a final report describing the ability of the test method to identify and quantify the organic vapors produced during the heating of resin products. Provide HWI with a test method that can be used to continue to conduct research into clean emission refractory brick products.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Impulse Technology Reducing Bending Moment in Structures Hayes, Daniel X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

Overview: The objective of this proposal is to perform prototype development and testing of a mechanism that reduces bending moment in structures with misaligned loading. An example application is the ‘below knee’ prosthetic leg shown in Figure attached. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of an adapter or a pylon that can redistributes the stress on the residual limb to minimize pressure spots, which can be painful and cause limb rejection. Current art is ‘static alignment’, which is performed manually by trained prosthetist. The process is not only subjective and time consuming but also ineffective for dynamic (walking) events.

Approach: Impulse Technology has developed models for bending moment reduction that can be applied as (a) an alignment adapter or (b) pylon. The end effect in either case is reduced pressure on the residual limb. The ME 440 team will implement these designs in forms of 3D printed or conventional prototypes. The first task is therefore the manufacturing of the adapter and the pylon. The next step is the experimental validation, where a test jig will be developed to apply known ground reaction forces (GRF in Figure attached) to the structure and measure the corresponding bending moment. Finally, the team will create a solid model from an existing prosthetic leg and then modify the design to accommodate the previously tested adapter or pylon.

The ME 440 team will work very closely with Professor Aman Haque, who is a co-founder of the startup company Impulse Technology.

Requirement: The ME 440 team members must be US citizens
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
John Crane Inc. Improvement to Lapping process Cannon, David X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

Background
As a leader in providing end to end solutions, John Crane manufactures a wide range of highly engineered products for the Oil and Gas, Power Generation, Chemical, and Pharmaceutical industries. These products include mechanical seals, couplings, hydro-dynamic bearings, seal support systems, filtration systems, and artificial lift devices which are used in rotating equipment such as pumps, mixers, blowers, and compressors
The cornerstone of the business started with preventing leakage. When a pump operates, liquid can leak out of the pump between the rotating shaft and the stationary pump casing (Fig. 1A). Initially, leakage was prevented with the use of a simple technology called flexible metallic packing (Fig.1B). Packing did not solve the problem completely as it essentially acts as a barrier where leakage could still occur. As sealing technology evolved, a new device called the mechanical seal was invented to minimize leakage with the use of two flat rings running against each other (Fig.1C). By having one ring rotate with the shaft, while the other ring remains stationary, a narrow gap could be maintained between the faces to allow a lubricating film to exist.
To ensure a narrow gap for the lubricating film, the seal faces must be very flat, typically 2 helium light bands, or 0.0000232”. A machining process known as lapping is used to make the faces flat. In the lapping process, a soft surface is rubbed against a harder surface with an abrasive between them for a set amount of time. Figure 2 depicts a typical work surface and the current format of the process.

Problem Statement
Through lapping parts, it can be difficult to produce properly flat surfaces within the correct tolerances. The process is time consuming due to the condition of the lapping plate (cleaning, conditioning, and preparing the surface) to reach desired specifications in flatness and curvature. John Crane is seeking a better way of obtaining hard seal faces with the correct curvatures, convex or concave, within a tighter tolerance, and at a faster pace than our current process.

Deliverable
Provide John Crane with a detailed configuration and analysis of the final design concept. The proposed approach will require validation thru experimental or numerical simulation. Include 3D drawings and details of technical calculations used to support the design’s feasibility and effectiveness, along with an overall conclusion of the findings. If the design permits, a prototype of the concept will be desired to visualize the functionality of the system.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
John Deere Frugal Electronic Hydraulic Valve Control Wheeler, Timothy X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Compact Utility Tractors (CUT) utilize hydraulic valves to control numerous implements and attachments. Typically these valves are controlled using mechanical linkages. Packaging mechanical controls in an ergonomic operating position on a CUT is a challenge given the small size of the machine. CUT owners are requesting controls that are easier to operate such as switches and buttons instead of levers. Commercially off the shelf systems exist for electronic control of hydraulic valves but these solutions require multiple pieces of electronic hardware and are expensive.
The goal of this project is to develop a frugal, low cost, hydraulic valve control system using existing direct acting electro-hydraulic valves controlled by conventional analog switches. This system will control auxiliary hydraulic valves that actuate various functions on implements and attachments used on Compact Tractors. Today, direct –acting electronic valves used in these applications exhibit harsh engagement\disengagement due to limited control of flow when the solenoid is actuated (currently step function transition from neutral to full flow as spool moves). This solution should reduce harshness by controlling spool movement so that hydraulic flow is ramped up\down gradually as spool shifts from neutral position. It is also desired that this solution allow user configurable valve engagement\disengagement ramp rates. The ideal solution would be applied to a single valve which can be used on any 1-4 Series John Deere CUT electrical architecture. Solution should be stand alone in that the only requirement for the system to operate on the machine is the availability of 12VDC current and hydraulic flow.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
John Deere Commercial Products Distributed Tire Inflations System for Compact Tractors Erdman, Michael X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Background:

There is a need monitor and adjust tire pressure for traction, compaction, fuel economy, stability, clearance, and possible advanced tire features. Central Tire Inflation Systems are expensive and have to be integrated into the machine.

Project Requirements:

The system shall be mounted on a wheel.
The system shall generate and store the power necessary from tractor motion, or external sources.
The system shall transmit pressure information to the tractor via wireless/BT (depending on tractor infrastructure). The system shall be able to be commanded from the tractor operator station or the wheel.
The system shall be able to fill any tire from 50% Max Pressure to Max Pressure within 5 minutes. (Review after initial calculations.)
The system shall store enough energy to allow for 1 inflation event per hour of operation in temperatures of -20 deg C.
The energy storage system shall be able to be removed and charged from a standard household outlet. Standard charge time 8 hrs. Rapid charging of 1 hr max. The cost of the rapid charger can cost more than the standard system.
The system shall charge fast enough to allow for 1 inflation event after 15 minutes of low speed (8 kph) operation.
The system direct material cost target shall be <$50 per wheel. Consider sales volume of 1000/yr for complete system.
The system shall not produce electrical interference that affects the vehicle or nearby devices.

Deliverables:
- System calculations, schematics, design, and installation drawings. Installation drawings shall include any relevant assembly instructions and a parts list of commercially and custom designed available parts to create a working prototype. Custom parts shall be fully detailed in drawings meeting ANSIY14.5 drawing standards.
- Failure mode analysis and plan.
- Trade off analysis of providing this system as a production vs. kit.
- Cost estimates and tradeoff analysis. List of compromises, reasons, and recommended improvements.
- Working physical demonstration model.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
John Stogin Scratchwork Tablet App Verbanec, Alan X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Scratchwork (scratchworktool.com) is a new project originating from Penn State's TechCelerator program and research at Princeton. Its primary goal is to help students and researchers incorporate their hand-drawn ideas (such as equations and diagrams) on a digital computer with as little effort as possible. It does this through tablet input as well as intelligent image processing of drawings on paper. This makes it easy to organize and communicate ideas and check calculations. (Think spell-check, but for math.)

We have a few potential projects that would be suitable for the Learning Factory. We propose the development of a tablet app for the iPad. This is not a simple undertaking--it involves a complex rendering system that displays detailed drawings and images, as well as a customized input mechanism to provide an intuitive user interface for interacting with these drawings and a network messaging protocol to communicate changes in state to other devices. These should be understandable but also challenging to a senior undergraduate team.

While working on the iPad app, the team will have an opportunity to examine the code we have written for our browser app and our Android tablet app currently in development. However, the team should expect to encounter new issues specific to Apple's software platform. A thorough understanding of the concepts supporting our browser-based product will be necessary to successfully build the iPad app.

Regarding deliverables, our hope is that the team produce an application that can conform to the communications protocol already established in our browser-based application and render drawings the same way as they appear on our browser application. Depending on team size, we can decide how many features we hope to support in the application.

The team can expect to gain valuable experience with software development tools such as git and xcode.

We are a young and growing company. If the team demonstrates promising interest and good work, there is potential for employment after the program ends.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
KCF Technologies, Inc 1 Design Optimization of Vertical Drop Lifts in Automotive Assembly Plants - Team 1 Catanach, Wallace X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

This project includes the opportunity to develop into a paid internship and/or full-time position with KCF Technologies serving the auto industry. The modern automotive assembly plant is an amazing accomplishment of automation, engineering and efficiency. Vertical drop lifts are a critical component, positioning the vehicle chassis at key stages during final assembly. However, the lifts are subject to unexpected failures that can cost millions of dollars in production delays. This is a 2-phase project to optimize the performance of vertical drop lifts. The first phase is to research and understand the design and operations, and to understand the top failure modes. In addition, the project team will prioritize the approach to sensorize, monitor, and analyze existing lifts operating in several assembly plants. Students will have access to KCF Technologies Smart Diagnostics (Industrial Internet of Things) software to supplement the analysis with live data from operational systems. In the second phase the team will develop opportunities for improvement and redesign the system for improved performance, longevity, and throughput. Proposed designs should be created using 3D modeling software, including simulations and functioning scale models.

Requested Dept: Mechanical, EDG, ESM

Requirements: Intellectual

NOTE: Two identical projects; the teams will be provided with the same information, and can pursue alternative designs.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
KCF Technologies, Inc 2 Design Optimization of Vertical Drop Lifts in Automotive Assembly Plants - Team 2 Bilen, Lennart X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

This project includes the opportunity to develop into a paid internship and/or full-time position with KCF Technologies serving the auto industry. The modern automotive assembly plant is an amazing accomplishment of automation, engineering and efficiency. Vertical drop lifts are a critical component, positioning the vehicle chassis at key stages during final assembly. However, the lifts are subject to unexpected failures that can cost millions of dollars in production delays. This is a 2-phase project to optimize the performance of vertical drop lifts. The first phase is to research and understand the design and operations, and to understand the top failure modes. In addition, the project team will prioritize the approach to sensorize, monitor, and analyze existing lifts operating in several assembly plants. Students will have access to KCF Technologies Smart Diagnostics (Industrial Internet of Things) software to supplement the analysis with live data from operational systems. In the second phase the team will develop opportunities for improvement and redesign the system for improved performance, longevity, and throughput. Proposed designs should be created using 3D modeling software, including simulations and functioning scale models.

Requested Dept: Mechanical, EDG, ESM

Requirements: Intellectual

NOTE: Two identical projects; the teams will be provided with the same information, and can pursue alternative designs.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Lockheed Martin Machine Learning application to Anomaly Detection Verbanec, Alan X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Lockheed Martin wishes to explore the use of unsupervised deep learning for anomaly detection. Specific focus is on detecting anomalous activity on an application display that contains expected movement or change. This is a proof-of-concept activity to determine feasibility of applying unsupervised deep learning technology for this type of situation. The project team will select a software application that includes a changing display, for ex., a flight simulator or weather map, and with some means for injecting anomalies. It is expected that the team will perform a trade study to select and then employ off-the-shelf deep learning software to detect anomalies on the display during execution of the application. Experimentation may include narrowing or expanding the area of interest and varying the obviousness or subtlety of the anomaly. The team will be responsible for demonstrating this detection of anomalies, and delivering a report that includes the trade study and analysis of the performance of the deep learning software under the varied situations.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Lockheed Martin - MFC 1 Linear Laser Pattern Generator Bilen, Lennart X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

The goal of this project is to generate a small portable linear laser pattern generator that can be utilized for testing laser capabilities. The portable laser tester will be required to generate consistent and accurate movements in a small form factor. Having this simulator interface with a software controlled application will also be required. The end deliverable of this project will result in a portable fixture that can control a laser’s movement to draw distinct patterns fed in through a control application. Ideally the tester will be capable of interfacing with various quality laser LEDs and not designed around a specific style/model. The product has to be designed with low cost and high precision as the primary objectives.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Lockheed Martin - MFC 2 Thermal Optimization of a Protective Shield for Heat Sinks on an Electronics Enclosure Wang, Donghai X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

The goal of this project is to design a protective shield that will cover the back side of an electronics enclosure out of which a number of heat sinks protrude. This cover will serve to protect individuals from injury caused by these heat sinks, as well as damage to the heat sinks. This electronics enclosure relies on the heat sinks for cooling via natural convection, so the addition of this shield cannot affect the cooling performance of the system. This project will utilize CFD analysis to determine the optimal shield design while evaluating the airflow around the heat sinks, around the shield, touch temperature of the shield, etc. The end deliverable of this project will be an effective protective shield with optimized geometry and material composition to meet the protection and thermal requirements for the shield.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Lycoming Engines Cylinder Flow Design and Analysis Wang, Donghai X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Lycoming Engines manufactures air-cooled piston engines for general aviation aircraft and UAV applications. Engine models range from 4 up to 400 horsepower. Lycoming is seeking to analyze and improve the cylinder flow design of their EL-005 engine. The EL-005 is a 4 horsepower, single cylinder, jet fueled, two stroke engine that uses a scavenging technique to remove exhaust gas and breathe intake air into the cylinder. This is an essential process that is required for stable and complete combustion. A new design is sought to optimize the airflow reducing pumping loses and increasing efficiency. The team will first create a detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the current design as a preliminary baseline for comparison. Based on the preliminary analysis, students will make design changes to achieve the improvements listed above.

To aide in the design process, students are expected to use a CFD software package to provide a detailed airflow analysis. Students will also be expected to use a solid modeling program (e.g. Solidworks) to view the current design and edit geometric features for iterative flow analysis. Primary deliverables will then include a detailed report and presentation to Lycoming of a new design option or options with analyses presented to include flow comparisons, manufacturability and relative cost estimates. A model of the improved design may be made for comparison.

Requirements:
-Understanding of reciprocating engine principles, primarily two-stroke
-Analysis of current cylinder airflow characteristics
-Analysis of the recommended redesign
-Detailed technical report; Model

Provided Materials/Information:
-Engine performance data (power output, speed, etc.) and airflow data
-Available drawings and CAD models of current cylinder design
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Manitowoc Cranes Crane Hook Load Measurement System Sommer, Joe X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Manitowoc Cranes is committed to providing the most innovative, advanced and comprehensive range of lifting solutions, with products that have long set the standard for excellence worldwide. Our Product lines include Grove mobile telescoping cranes, Manitowoc lattice boom crawler cranes, Potain tower cranes, National Crane boom trucks and Shuttlelift industrial cranes. Each of the different product lines operate in a similar manner, in that the boom supports a winch driven rope that is used to attach to a load. Manitowoc Cranes has the need to be able to determine how much load is on the hook of every crane model across each of their product lines. In the mobile telescopic crane product lines, this is currently accomplished through a complex system that uses pressure sensors, angle sensors, and length sensors. The pressure sensor is in the lift cylinder, and it is used to determine how much force is on the cylinder. The angle sensor is attached to the side of the base section of the boom and is used to measure the boom angle. Finally, the length sensors are along the entire boom to determine how long the telescopic boom is. The on-board computer system then takes all the data readings from the each of the sensors and solves a free body diagram to determine how much load is on the hook of the crane. All of this is done in real time as the operator of the machine picks up loads and changes the geometry of the crane.

This method of calculating the hook load introduces a fair amount of complexities though. The boom sections are not perfectly rigid, so a correction must be made to the angle sensor readings to account for boom deformation. Also, the reading from the pressure sensor can be altered by hydraulic oil temperature and friction on the rod of the cylinder. Due to these added complexities, Manitowoc Cranes is looking to develop a new, more direct method to accurately calculate the hook load. So, the PSU Capstone team will be tasked to conceptualize, design, and prototype a more reliable and cost-effective system that will be able to measure hook load.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Marathon Petroleum Corporation Quality Control and Testing of Vapor Isolation Methodology Moore, Jason X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The project team will be given a provided pipe diameter and be tasked with constructing a testing apparatus to validate the integrity of a mud plug vapor seal across a twenty-four hour time frame. They will verify vapor seals using both the minimum and maximum mix ratios provided by the company. Additionally, the pipe shall be exposed to vibration and heat following the installation of a mud plug to simulate movement and heat associated with the fit-up and welding of pipe.

The project team will develop and validate a quality control testing method and guidelines, such as hardness testing, to verify conformance to the provided company mud plug mixing procedure. The mixing procedure provides a minimum, target, and maximum mix ratio of water to Bentonite to ensure mud stability and prevent slumping, which in turn could lead to a loss of vapor isolation.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
New Pig Corporation Stormwater Runoff Filter Catanach, Wallace X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

Stormwater runoff is generated from rain and snowmelt that flows over land or other impervious surfaces like paved streets and parking lots and does not soak into the ground. The runoff picks up pollutants like oils, chemicals and dirt that can adversely affect rivers, streams, lakes and coastal waters. To protect these bodies of water and the associated ecosystem, companies and communities use stormwater control solutions to filter out pollutants before reaching local waters.

New Pig, which is a global supplier of environmental and safety solutions, offers several products for stormwater runoff management. The goal of this project is to assist with the development of an improved stormwater filter sock. A filter sock is a durable and permeable outer-layer of material filled with filter media and used around storm grates to remove contaminants before going down the drain.

The project team will build prototypes of filter socks and conduct tests to determine the optimal design for the product that takes into account 1) the type and quantity of filter media, 2) the flow rate and 3) the effectiveness of removing metal contaminants such as lead, zinc, copper, chromium and cadmium from the water.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD)/ US Army 1 Smart Helmet Augmented Reality Kit (SHARK) Verbanec, Alan X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Project objective: The objective of this project is to design and prototype an augmented reality (AR) smart helmet display for use in combat operations in conjunction with the TAK-A (Tactical Assault Kit – Android) situational awareness and mission command system.

Project Background: While conducting a hostage rescue mission in Afghanistan, a US Special Operations soldier was ambushed and killed when entering a doorway. This man, called the point man in close quarters battle (CQB), assumes an enormous amount of risk at every turn. Not only does he have to see the other man first, but he also has to determine if this individual is a threat before engaging. Too often, this life or death decision results in the other guy getting the first shot. Admiral William McRaven, the Operator’s commanding officer during the mission, asked the DoD Engineering community to develop a way to ensure a death like this never happens again. The simple answer is to equip the Operator with more armor, but if he is wearing a helmet that covers his face, how will he see?

The Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) researches, develops, and prototypes products to support the Army’s needs. Evolving threats on the modern battlefield require rapid and precise communication and exchange of information. By development and implementation of algorithms, new sensors and hardware, NVESD works to save US Warfighter’s lives; SHARK proposes to do this by allowing a soldier to see even when covered in armor.

Project Requirements: NVESD strongly prefers a design which delivers binocular augmented reality helmet mounted HUD with an AR field of view greater than 40 degrees. A virtual reality (VR) helmet display with a field of view greater than or equal to 120 degrees is acceptable. The system must provide the user a natural perception of their surroundings as well as heads up access to incoming information, such as positions of forces, reconnaissance footage, maps, etc. A minimum frame rate of 120 FPS and a multiplexed stereoscopy camera system is required. An active or passive parallax mitigation system must be implemented to provide the user a clear and focused image at ranges both close and far. System inputs will be data from an Android device, including GPS, elevation, video, etc. This data must be able to be displayed on the heads up display in such a way that it is clearly visible for indoor and outdoor operations in normal conditions. The system must be able to be operated while the user is conducting combat-representative activities, such as rapidly moving through a cluttered area and operating a weapon.

Heads up displays meeting the above specifications will be available as government furnished equipment (GFE), as well as one GoPro Hero camera. Additional resources, such as military equipment, can be available depending on the nature of the request.


Deliverables include:
1. Detailed design report
2. CAD drawings of the components
3. CAD models of the assembly and components
4. Description of installation and assembly instructions
5. Operations manual
6. Cost estimate
7. Functioning prototype

Stretch Goal: Provide novel method of user interaction.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD)/ US Army 2 Blackbody Target for Sensor Testing Sommer, Joe X X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Project Objective: The objective of this project is to design and build a pair of large-format targets for use in sensor testing. Each target consists of a flat plate with several feet of surface area and is heated or cooled. The targets need to be thermally uniform over the surface and maintain stable temperature. The target system needs to include controls to manage the temperature of the targets, compute the dew point to prevent condensation on the targets, and log ambient temperature and temperatures at several places on the plate.
Project Background: The Research Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM), Communications-Electronics Research Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC), Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) researches, develops, and prototypes products to support the Army’s needs. This effort supports testing of thermal sensors in Degraded Visual Environments (DVE), to include dust, snow, fog, and rain. The placement of targets set to different temperatures in the scene allows the attenuation of the obscurant to be estimated by evaluating the contrast between the targets.
Project Requirements: Successful completion of this project will produce a two-panel temperature-controlled target system. The system will include a control system for operation. The system should be “plug and play” to the extent possible. (i.e., the desired temperatures are preset and the system just needs to be plugged in and turned on.) The controls should be housed in a separate enclosure and connected to the target enclosures with power and signal cables.
Data logging should be performed to an SD card or similar medium (USB-based storage is not acceptable). The system should automatically start logging when the system is turned on. Storage capacity should support at least 30 hours of logging at 1 minute intervals. The SD card should be easily changeable in the field. The system needs to be able to operate in a reduced-power mode to function with small generators. Real-time display of multiple temperatures is desirable. Other controls and indicators TBD.
All system components should be suitable for extended exterior exposure, including rain. All electronics and electrical connections must be weatherproof. Any wood components should be painted with exterior paint. Metal parts should be treated against corrosion.
Project Deliverables: (Preliminary)
1. Design study of control system architecture (industrial controls vs embedded processor, thermocouple vs RTD, etc.) with estimated costs and recommended approach.
2. Two large-format heated/cooled targets
3. Control/logging system for the targets (hardware and software) installed in ruggedized enclosure
4. Cable set with 1 spare of each cable
5. Two logging storage media
6. Operation instructions and single-page “quick start” sheet
7. Copies of software (source code and executables) and/or controller programming, as applicable
8. Startup plots of system operating in full power and reduced power mode in 2-3 ambient temperatures (desirable for cold/moderate/hot if available- subject to weather)
9. Detailed final design report
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD)/ US Army 3 Augmented Reality Grenade Trajectory (ARGT) Display Wheeler, Timothy X X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Project Objective: The objective of this project is to design and prototype an Augmented Reality Grenade Trajectory display for assisting Warfighters in the aiming of the M203 and M320 Grenade Launcher Module. The ballistic trajectory of the round should be visualized to the user within their head worn display, or within a camera’s display of the weapon. The final project can be as simple as a camera, computer, and display with the requisite markers and sensors, or utilize a commercial augmented reality head worn display.

Project Background: The Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) researches, develops and prototypes products to support the Army’s needs. These prototypes include integration of augmented reality and weapon sensor systems. One such application is intended to support improved M203 and M320 40mm grenade launcher accuracy. The M203 and M320 grenade launchers are used as close fire support against point and area targets that cannot be reached by direct fire. This often requires super elevation of the weapon system which makes targeting difficult. This project seeks to simplify the aiming process by displaying the grenade trajectory overlaid on the Soldier’s heads up display.

Project Requirements:
The project requires a design that utilizes a mockup training weapon, computer vision, fiducial markers, and a computing platform. A working prototype of the design is required, and with any sensors attached to the mockup weapon.

Topic Area: Computer vision

Project Deliverables:

Deliverables include:
a. Detailed design report
b. CAD drawings of any components
c. CAD models of any assembly and components
d. Operations manual
e. Cost estimate
f. Video of system in operation
g. Test report for any testing of the system
h. Stretch Goal: Incorporate wind into the ballistics model of the round
i. Stretch Goal: Incorporate terrain model to determine proper end point of trajectory

Provided items:
• Mockup M4 weapon
• Mockup M203, or M320 Grenade Launcher Module
• Augmented Reality Display (Vuzix STAR 1200XLD, or similar)

Field trip:
• Students will visit NVESD for weapons familiarization
• Stretch Goal: Students will test the system at Ft. A.P. Hill, VA or Quantico Marine Corp Base, VA
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Olympus Scientific Solutions Americas Capacitance & Dissipation Measurement Automation with LabVIEW Wheeler, Timothy X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The Olympus SSA facility located in State College specializes in the manufacturing of phased-array ultrasound transducers for industrial NDT applications. Throughout the manufacturing process there are several testing stages conducted for each phased-array transducer and all of its components. One of these tests is a capacitance and dissipation sweep of the piezoelectric crystal.

Currently, we utilize software that is written in the Visual Basic .NET framework. This software directly communicates with a multiplexer which is connected to a mainframe. Each test produces a graphical display of the measurements. We would like to recreate this software using LabVIEW.

This software will be required to measure the capacitance and dissipation of a micro coaxial cable (up to 128 elements), calculate and measure several parameters with pass/fail determination, display these measurements graphically, and also write the measurement data to a database. Physical components of this system will include a mainframe, multiplexer, desktop computer, monitor, mouse, and keyboard. The mainframe has a custom attachment used for connecting the transducers to the system.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PCC Structurals - San Leandro Investment Casting Mold Handling for Factory Automation Moore, Jason X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

PCC Structurals - San Leandro is seeking a design and prototype for a mold cooling and transport trailer for its investment casting operation. The trailer will hold up to six molds at a time, supporting each mold in a vertical orientation during cooling and transport. The fixtures supporting each mold must be precisely located to allow for interaction with a mold handling robot. The fixtures must be able to accommodate molds of various shape, size, and weight. The trailer and fixtures must be designed to withstand the high temperature environment in which they will operate. During transport, the molds must be protected from damage should the trailer roll over bumps in its path.

Students will be provided with all the necessary background information, including desired trailer size, mold dimensions and weight, and other functional requirements. Project deliverables are as follows:

1. A blueprint and 3D model of the completed trailer design.
2. Time permitting, a functioning prototype of a single mold handling fixture.

Students will be asked to participate in a weekly phone call with PCC engineering to discuss project progress.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Philips Ultrasound Cable Assembly Continuous Electronic Monitoring Wheeler, Timothy X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

Requesting 3 EE and 1 ME Student Team
Description: Philips Ultrasound needs to update and improve a Cable Assembly Reliability Test system that is used in our R&D Lab. The test system is used to qualify both new ultrasound transducer cables as well as verify design changes for sustaining changes to the cable designs. The system uses a continuous monitoring of the cable assembly elements during bend and flex reliability testing. The current cable interface needs to be upgraded to be compatible with our most current cable designs.
Project: The student team will:
1. Review the Current electrical and mechanical design for the cable monitoring sub system.
2. Propose circuit board and mechanical design changes to modernize the subsystem.
3. Provide prototype and final circuit board and mechanical subassemblies.
4. Conduct Installation and functional test of prototype and designed subassemblies.
5. Provide final schematic and mechanical design details.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PMG Pennsylvania Corporation COOLING WATER RECIRCULATION SYSTEM EVALUATION AND IMPROVEMENT Cannon, David X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

PROJECT INFORMATION
PMG PA employs recirculated water to cool its sintering furnaces which are core to the manufacture of its powdered metal shock absorber components. The existing system was implemented in 2004 as part of the original construction of the green field facility. Given continued business expansion, the system now requires an overall evaluation and upgrade. This project involves the assessment of the current system with resulting findings used to design system upgrades or overall replacement scaled to company growth and reliability targets.
OBJECTIVE
As stated in the PROJECT INFORMATION section, the primary objective of this effort is to secure a cost effective, energy efficient and reliable cooling water recirculation system (CWRS) for PMG PA powdered metal continuous sintering furnaces. These furnaces operate at a peak hot zone range of 1093 to 1150 deg. C at load rates approximately 500 kg per hour. The purpose of the sintering furnace cooling chamber is to remove the latent heat carried from the sintering operation and, in certain cases, to control the rate of cooling to produce a resulting metallurgical pearlite structure to enhance downstream processing.
The existing CWRS is completely functional and regularly maintained although there is some water loss (steam) and efficiency is questioned as with pipe scaling and with the oversized pumps that are periodically throttled back in operation. When the CWRS is not operational for any reason, a redundant city water make up system takes over. This water is not recaptured and is used at a significant operating cost penalty. Failure of both systems would result in catastrophic furnace damage and would result in extended business interruption, although the city water back up is extremely reliable and used commonly as an industry standard back up.
Regarding the question of system size, the existing CWRS is theoretically sufficient to handle the PMG PA current capacity. Because of known operational inefficiencies, this conclusion is, however, under challenge. The early project work regarding efficiencies is therefore key to the development of accurate final conclusions.
Because the PMG PA production output continues to grow, the system is also in need of a thorough engineering evaluation to ensure its longer-term viability and cost efficiency. Results of this overall evaluation will include current operational effectiveness and economics, design and simulation of the impact of system upgrades, review and specification of replacement systems and an operational and economic justification to support the recommended future direction. Finally, and from a sustainability standpoint, the project should deliver ideas for uses of the latent heat exchanged by the recirculation process.


DELIVERABLES/TENATIVE PROJECT PLAN
Summarized below is a draft timeline and deliverables that will be reviewed and mutually agreed upon with the PMG/PSU CAPSTONE team
• Develop project plan with deliverables = WEEK 1
PHASE I
• Analyze current system
• Identify inefficiencies
• Risk analysis on current system
• Sizing for additional demand
• Current cost of operation
• Current cost vs pump inefficiency
• Controls evaluation - current vs improved
• Sensor specification and placement-POKE YOKE
• Recommend changes/upgrades to current system
• REPORT #1 = WEEK 5/6
PHASE II
• Re-define variables
• Inputs
• Outputs
• Design optimum system
• Compare to available systems in marketplace/or internal design concept
• Develop simulation model for plug and play
• REPORT #2 = Present new system design = WEEK 10
PHASE III
• Develop/implement changes per two previous formal reviews
• Conduct risk assessment of two systems
• Perform ROI economic justification
• Develop budgets for each alternative
• Prepare macro timeline for each project implementation



PMG TEAM/FUNCTIONS
The following team of PMG PA disciplines will be an integral part of the CAPSTONE project effort to ensure optimum use of time and resource.
• Engineering Manager
• Maintenance Manager
• Plant Manager
• CFO
• CAPSTONE project liaison
• As needed production a
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Precision Castparts Corp Investment Casting Mold Cleaning Improvement Purdum, Charlie X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

The presence of foreign contaminants in investment casting molds leads to defects that must be repaired or can lead to the casting being scrap. The advancement of aerospace casting design has led to increasingly complex part geometries that are even more difficult to effectively clean. These high levels of defects ultimately lead to unplanned rework or scrap. The scope of this project is to determine the most robust investment casting mold cleaning option. The project will include designing an appropriate test mold that integrates several key parameters, as well as designing and testing various cleaning methods and machinery. The project will include 3d printing of test molds, building of a test rig(s) for trials, and quantifying which option is the most robust. This will be achieved by introducing a preset amount of foreign contaminants and evaluating the weight percentage removed through the cleaning options.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Acoustics (Grad Program) 1 Multichannel speaker array and amplifier - Team 1 Wheeler, Timothy X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Team One:
Build and test a multichannel audio amplifier intended to drive an array of miniature loudspeakers. Each channel should deliver approx. 3W to a single small loudspeaker. Total system must drive 24 speaker channels, goal is 48 channels. Power source: mains electric. Audio interface connectors and cables must allow connection to the speaker array(s) built by team two. A viable design concept is to use commercially available moderately priced audio amplifier boards.

Team Two:
Build and test a line array of miniature loudspeakers. Concept is a 10 element line array of commercially available speakers approximately1.25 in. diameter. The housing/box must provide separate back air volume for each speaker. Cables and connectors must interface to the amplifier built by team 1. Requirement is to build one 10-element line array. Goal - 10 such arrays.

An additional project goal for the two teams working together is to demonstrate the operation of one or more speaker arrays. Signals to the amplifiers would be provided through a multichannel USB audio interface box (MOTU 24Ao) that can be lent to the project.

NOTE: if only a single team is available, my priority is the amplifier.

For the amplifier project, a team of electrical engineers may be appropriate, although a mechanical engineering team member may be helpful for packaging, cabling and thermal considerations.

The speaker line array project, includes significant aspects of both mechanical and electrical engineering, though mechanical considerations are probably dominant.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Acoustics (Grad Program) 2 Multichannel speaker array and amplifier - Team 2 Erdman, Michael X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Team One:
Build and test a multichannel audio amplifier intended to drive an array of miniature loudspeakers. Each channel should deliver approx. 3W to a single small loudspeaker. Total system must drive 24 speaker channels, goal is 48 channels. Power source: mains electric. Audio interface connectors and cables must allow connection to the speaker array(s) built by team two. A viable design concept is to use commercially available moderately priced audio amplifier boards.

Team Two:
Build and test a line array of miniature loudspeakers. Concept is a 10 element line array of commercially available speakers approximately1.25 in. diameter. The housing/box must provide separate back air volume for each speaker. Cables and connectors must interface to the amplifier built by team 1. Requirement is to build one 10-element line array. Goal - 10 such arrays.

An additional project goal for the two teams working together is to demonstrate the operation of one or more speaker arrays. Signals to the amplifiers would be provided through a multichannel USB audio interface box (MOTU 24Ao) that can be lent to the project.

NOTE: if only a single team is available, my priority is the amplifier.

For the amplifier project, a team of electrical engineers may be appropriate, although a mechanical engineering team member may be helpful for packaging, cabling and thermal considerations.

The speaker line array project, includes significant aspects of both mechanical and electrical engineering, though mechanical considerations are probably dominant.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Acoustics (Grad Program) 3 Demonstration Apparatus for a Driven Vibrating String with Nonlinearities Wheeler, Timothy X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The string that is fixed a both ends is usually considered to be a linear vibrating system. An electromagnetically driven thin wire was long used by a former faculty member to demonstrate the modes of the flexible string. Recent attempts to duplicate this demonstration have built a different implementation that is beset by small nonlinearity that significantly complicates the behavior of the system. The newer apparatus uses a shorter wire. Thus the vibration amplitude is a larger fraction of the string length, which is likely the cause of the nonlinearity.

The objective of this project is to build an apparatus that duplicates the behavior of both the older and the newer vibrating systems. The apparatus will have two strings, one long and one shorter, with the understanding that only one string will be driven at a time. The wire is driven by running an oscillating current through the wire, and placing a strong permanent magnet near the center of the wire. This creates an oscillating force that drives the motion of the wire.

The system also needs a method to monitor the motion of the wire. We anticipate that a strobe light flashing at a frequency that is nearly equal to the driving force will allow the wire to be visualized. Other possible methods of motion detection may be investigated and implemented if they appear feasible.

The wire is preferably a Nichrome wire, chosen for its high electrical resistivity. The larger resistance of the wire allows its impedance to be monitored as a function of drive frequency. (The elctromechanical coupling of the driving mechanism provides the frequency dependence, and may allow an independent estimate of the wire motion.)

Other design details of the frame that holds the string(s) will be provided at the first sponsor meeting. Note that the resonance frequency of the wire(s) is anticipated to be in the vicinity of 100 Hz to 600 kHz.

Deliverables are anticipated to be 1) the completed prototype holding frame for the two Nichrome vibrating wires, 2) a strobe light, probably using white LEDs, whose frequency is controlled to have a small frequency difference to the electromechanical drive frequency.

It is my hope that the project would include one or more students with mechanical engineering skills and one or more students with electrical engineering skills. Designing and building the frame is primarily a mechanical design task, while designing and building the motion detection system is primarily electrical design.

I have attached a photo of an earlier apparatus (no longer available at the University) and a technical paper by a student who used that apparatus. Note that the previous design was made from wood. Wood is not not a requirement, but it may be appropriate, as the wire must carry a current (at low voltage), and thus must be electrically insulated from any metal parts of the frame.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU BME 1 Phototherapy Device for Activation of Light Stimuli Responsive Nanoparticles In Vivo Hayes, Daniel X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

A lab scale device is required to test nanoparticle photo-therapeutics in vivo. Photosensitive nanoparticles provide a convenient method to provide spatial and temporal control of drug delivery in light accessible tissues. The system will be required to house anesthetized small animals, control light dose, control illuminated tissue volume and provide environmental control for animal safety.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU BME 2 Tensile Bioreactor for Culture of Living Tendon Explants Hayes, Daniel X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The focus of my research in the Biomedical Engineering Department is to study how mechanical forces and strains influence cell biology in tendons/ligaments and how this interaction drives tissue remodeling processes, including degeneration, repair, and development. To accomplish this, I plan to culture living tendon explants and expose them to various loading conditions that induce tissue remodeling while examining how these conditions alter both the mechanical stimuli that cells are exposed to as well as their response to these stimuli within the native tissue. This requires a tensile loading bioreactor that can be placed in an incubator and maintain tendon viability while applying prescribed loading patterns. The design and construction of the bioreactor are the primary deliverables for this project, and will likely include the use of electromechanical motors, load cells, control software, and a bathing environment for maintaining tissue viability. Therefore, a multidisciplinary team of students from the Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and/or Engineering Design Departments would be appropriate for this project.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU BME 3 Blood Clot Analyzer Bilen, Lennart X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Surgeons at the Hershey medical center reached out to the researchers within Artificial Heart and Cardiovascular Dynamics lab at Penn State. The surgeons had realized that some blood clots are often substantially harder to remove than others and proposed establishing a project to determine the root cause of these variations. This project will focus on constructing a functioning flow loop to provide answers to such questions. There are several features of this project for which the entire team can provide varying insight.

Project Deliverables and Beneficiaries:

To begin, the team will construct a flow loop which includes selecting the proper materials, motor, and filtration method to viably conduct accurate in vitro testing of blood clots. For accurate and meaningful data the vessel being tested will have to remain alive during testing. The team will examine the varying conditions required to maintain survival; including oxygenation, flow rate, and others. In conjunction with mechanical loop construction the team will also be designing and creating a chamber to house the vessel for testing. The chamber must also meet the requirements to preserve life; however, it will also have to contain several key structural features. These key features include a viewing window, tampered vessel housing, pressure transducer ports, etc.
In addition to the mechanical system construction the team will also program a plethora of biological situations into the system. These situations include pulsatile and steady state flow rates, high and low blood pressure, and several others. Dr. Manning and Bryan already have some ideas on how to implement these skills into this project.
Lastly, there is a large biological component to the project as well. Material selection, life sustaining conditions, and data collection will focus heavily on the Biomedical Engineering students. If possible, the team may study clot composition, vessel selection, and other biologically significant conditions which would affect clot development. This project will be in conjunction with the Hershey medical center and we may get the chance to run actual clots from cadavers through the loop.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU CEE 1 RIFFLE (Remote Independent Friendly Field-Logger Electronics) Bilen, Lennart X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Motivation:
Water quality data coupled with the emerging field of data science has the potential to expedite scientific research and inform decisions about water resource allocation. Current water sensors are large, cumbersome to use and require specialized maintenance in order to gain reliable data sources. This limits the number of sensors citizen groups can deploy as well as the duration that they can be maintained. The Learning Factory Team of senior undergraduate students from multiple disciplines will develop a low cost (<$60) water quality sensor called the RIFFLE (Remote Independent Friendly Field-Logger Electronics) to measure conductivity, turbidity, colorimetry and temperature. A current prototype of this device is available with functioning hardware and software. The prototype RIFFLE can record accurate conductivity values in solutions over a range of salinities typical of freshwater environments with strong correlation to values reported by HACH conductivity probes. R2 of 0.998 (0 to 1,000 uS/cm) and 0.9891 over a broad range 0-8,000 uS/cm.
The students will modify the design or redesign such that 1) the device could be easily assembled by a layperson, 2) the battery life is maximized, and 3) additional functions can be incorporated into the design, including wireless communication and data logging capabilities.
Objectives:
We have completed initial testing of the RIFFLE data logger board and sensors. The initial design selection of the RIFFLE, including the 3-D printed housing, sensor geometry, and data-logging methods (e.g., SD card, Bluetooth or USB) have been completed. As our chief users for the RIFFLE are community groups and citizen scientists, it is important that the RIFFLE be flexible for a variety of monitoring needs. We would initially like to optimize sensing for conductivity, including verification of sensitivity at environmentally relevant concentrations. Accurate turbidity, temperature and colorimetry based data are also desirable. Following laboratory bench scale testing the RIFFLE will be deployed in local waterways. This initial deployment will ensure adequate durability, data logging, longeveity of the sensor and functionality upon retrieval. For example, the housing must be tested and fabricated for longevity through exposure to the elements. Additionally, ability of the RIFFLEs to be retrieved and data collected following large storm events needs to be verified. Following retrieval/collection of the RIFFLEs the design will be modified as necessary for a second round of installations.
Specific objectives for this study are:
• Refine the existing sensor design such that it can be easily implemented by a layperson. This includes setup, deployment and data collection from the sensor.
• Expand the sensor with other capabilities, such as pH and wireless communication.
• Develop support materials in the form of how-to guides, video tutorials and lesson plans to facilitate construction and use of the sensor by citizen scientists, students and teachers.
Deliverables for the project:
1) Data that shows success of the RIFFLE at environmentally relevant concentrations.
2) Working prototype(s) of the RIFFLE capable of logging temperature, conductivity, colorimetry and turbidity for retrieval through a memory card or wireless data download.
3) A manual for citizens and other students that describes how to assemble, program, and deploy the RIFFLE.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU CEE 2 RIFFLE (Remote Independent Friendly Field-Logger Electronics) Catanach, Wallace X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Motivation:
Water quality data coupled with the emerging field of data science has the potential to expedite scientific research and inform decisions about water resource allocation. Current water sensors are large, cumbersome to use and require specialized maintenance in order to gain reliable data sources. This limits the number of sensors citizen groups can deploy as well as the duration that they can be maintained. The Learning Factory Team of senior undergraduate students from multiple disciplines will develop a low cost (<$60) water quality sensor called the RIFFLE (Remote Independent Friendly Field-Logger Electronics) to measure conductivity, turbidity, colorimetry and temperature. A current prototype of this device is available with functioning hardware and software. The prototype RIFFLE can record accurate conductivity values in solutions over a range of salinities typical of freshwater environments with strong correlation to values reported by HACH conductivity probes. R2 of 0.998 (0 to 1,000 uS/cm) and 0.9891 over a broad range 0-8,000 uS/cm.
The students will modify the design or redesign such that 1) the device could be easily assembled by a layperson, 2) the battery life is maximized, and 3) additional functions can be incorporated into the design, including wireless communication and data logging capabilities.
Objectives:
We have completed initial testing of the RIFFLE data logger board and sensors. The initial design selection of the RIFFLE, including the 3-D printed housing, sensor geometry, and data-logging methods (e.g., SD card, Bluetooth or USB) have been completed. As our chief users for the RIFFLE are community groups and citizen scientists, it is important that the RIFFLE be flexible for a variety of monitoring needs. We would initially like to optimize sensing for conductivity, including verification of sensitivity at environmentally relevant concentrations. Accurate turbidity, temperature and colorimetry based data are also desirable. Following laboratory bench scale testing the RIFFLE will be deployed in local waterways. This initial deployment will ensure adequate durability, data logging, longeveity of the sensor and functionality upon retrieval. For example, the housing must be tested and fabricated for longevity through exposure to the elements. Additionally, ability of the RIFFLEs to be retrieved and data collected following large storm events needs to be verified. Following retrieval/collection of the RIFFLEs the design will be modified as necessary for a second round of installations.
Specific objectives for this study are:
• Refine the existing sensor design such that it can be easily implemented by a layperson. This includes setup, deployment and data collection from the sensor.
• Expand the sensor with other capabilities, such as pH and wireless communication.
• Develop support materials in the form of how-to guides, video tutorials and lesson plans to facilitate construction and use of the sensor by citizen scientists, students and teachers.
Deliverables for the project:
1) Data that shows success of the RIFFLE at environmentally relevant concentrations.
2) Working prototype(s) of the RIFFLE capable of logging temperature, conductivity, colorimetry and turbidity for retrieval through a memory card or wireless data download.
3) A manual for citizens and other students that describes how to assemble, program, and deploy the RIFFLE.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU CIMP-3D 1 Flat Plate Welding Machine for Study of Thermoplastic Polymer Welding Manogharan, Guha X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

In thermoplastic polymers, mechanical strength is developed by the entanglement of polymer chain molecules. When a mechanical load applied to the bulk material, load is transferred between the polymer chains through these entanglements. Similar to welding of metals, welding of polymers relies on fusion of the two substrate materials to develop a strong bond. In polymer welding, this occurs by the diffusion of polymer chain molecules across the weld interface, and entanglement with polymer chains on the opposite side. The rate of diffusion of the polymer chains decreases exponentially with decreasing temperature. Current theories used to calculate the strength of polymer welds do not accurately account for the additional reduction in rate of strength development at the weld interface due to the decrease in availability of entanglement sites at the interface as the weld process progresses. To validate a new theory that takes this additional rate reduction into account, a flat plate welding machine is required to produce welded tensile specimens.

The flat plate welder must:
- Be capable of maintaining temperatures to quickly (less than 20 seconds) and reliably melt the weld interface of the specimen to be studied.
- Must be able to weld ABS, Polycarbonate, and polyetherimide (Ultem)
- Temperature should be maintained through closed-loop control
- Be capable of welding six (6) ASTM D-638 Type I tensile specimen at once
- All six specimens must have an identical thermal history
- Be capable of welding the tensile specimens with weld interface angles of 30o, 45o, 60o, and 90o relative to the gage length of the tensile specimen
- Be capable of recording the temperature history of the tensile specimens
- Ideally use one of the six tensile specimens to record temperature, as all should have an identical temperature history

Stretch Goal:
- Ability to quench the weld interface of each specimen to produce alternate thermal histories
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU CIMP-3D 2 Couette Flow Fiber Alignment Chamber for 3D Printing Composite Reinforced Filament Campbell, Rob X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

The goal in this project is to design, build, and test a device capable of determining the optimal geometry and process parameters for a Couette flow chopped fiber alignment chamber to be used in an additive manufacturing machine. The chamber will be used to align chopped fibers (glass or carbon) within a thermoset resin. Aligned fibers will be much less likely to clog a downstream deposition nozzle.
Couette flow is induced in a cylindrical tank of fluid when a concentric cylinder inside the tank rotates, causing circumferential flow inside the tank. Fluid velocity will be greatest at the wall of the rotating cylinder and lowest at the tank wall. This velocity gradient and resulting shear stress will align the chopped fibers with the flow direction. The capstone team is tasked with building a coquette flow chamber capable of testing the fiber alignment hypothesis. The flow chamber must have the following characteristics:
• Produce only laminar flow to prevent fiber entanglement
• Accommodate multiple inner cylinder diameters
• Alignment of the fibers must be observable
• Controllable and measurable rotation rate of the inner cylinder

The goal of the prototype alignment chamber produced by the capstone team is to determine:
• The ratio of inner and outer diameters that will best align chopped fibers within the target fluid viscosity range
• The rotation rate of the inner cylinder that will best align fibers in the target length range and aspect ratio
• The amount of time necessary to ensure all fibers in the cylinder are aligned
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Department of Dermatology Standardizing the full-body skin exam process Purdum, Charlie X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The objective of this project is to identify a standard examination process for full-body dermatological exams. The process should involve a logical progression through landmarks, be well-documents, and represent best practices for efficiency and efficacy. The project team will interact with physicians as they work to establish a baseline for existing processes (e.g., how long do they take, how do they vary). Those data will then be used to identify a new process incorporating the physician, patient, and tools. The new process should be benchmarked against the existing ones to document areas of improvement.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Enterprise Networking & Communication Services Voice Services Value Stream Mapping Purdum, Charlie X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Enterprise Networking & Communication Services (ENCS), a unit within Penn State IT, provides a core set of networking and communication services to the Penn State community, at University Park and across Pennsylvania. We provide services from the broadest scale, the Enterprise Network, to the most personal, individual telephone devices and voicemail options.

ENCS recently completed a Process Optimization Project (POP), which resulted in documenting and identifying improvement opportunities in our Voice Services Request Fulfillment areas.

The objective of this project is to continue the POP effort by developing a value stream map for Voice Services Request Fulfillment that
• Identifies current state processes in greater detail with times
• Identifies and refines additional process improvement opportunities

Team members will have the opportunity to work one on one with ENCS staff members ‘doing the work.’ Multiple site visits may be required to view operations, estimate times, and lead small group value stream mapping sessions with staff.
Ideas for next steps based on the team’s findings are welcome and encouraged.
Deliverables include a project charter, electronic copies of the value stream map and a written discussion of the map describing its contents for use throughout the unit, in addition to any deliverables outlined by the Learning Factory. The team may be asked to give a final presentation to unit staff involved in the process.
This project has the potential to be a model for other Penn State IT operations.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Fluids Lab 2 Laminar Flow Viscometer Moore, Jason X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Major head losses are a result of frictional forces between a fluid and surrounding surface. To simplify viscosity calculations, minor head losses are often negated by creating dominating major head losses. The current Laminar Flow Viscometer Lab compares experimental viscosity measurements, from three different length capillary tubes, and variable temperature to that of theoretical data. As expected, the longest capillary tube provides the most accurate viscosity measurements at each temperature interval. Still, a reasonably large error is occurring between the data from the longest tube and the theoretical data. This error is assumed to be a result of the varying viscosity of the fluid as it travels through the capillary tube. Viscosity varies with temperature, therefore this varying viscosity is a results of heat transfer between the wall of the capillary tube and outside environment. Creating an isothermal environment for the current system will minimize the percent error between the experimental and theoretical viscosity measurements at each temperature interval.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Humanitarian Materials Team Smart, Secure and Sustainable Roofing Materials Kimel, Allen X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Research and develop a proof of concept (digital and/ physical model) for an affordable, sustainable, secure and resilient roofing system that contributes to the realization of energy-efficient building systems through leveraging off-grid solar power as well as other passive heating and cooling technologies. Address the key crosscutting challenges to innovative R&D for next-generation roofing technologies, which includes the availability of affordable, high-performance materials, innovative manufacturing processes to reduce costs, and the ability to integrate new technologies into existing building systems. The proposed roofing solution should be designed for enhance durability while also making provisions for the any emerging needs for adaptability/ flexibility with respect to the use of the building. In addition to performing life cycle cost analysis, the team will also assess the performance of the proposed roofing solution with respect to resistance to hygrothermal loads. The student team working on this project will investigate the feasibility and viability of developing existing aluminum panels (to be provided by the sponsor) into a composite roofing material that addresses the need for an affordable roofing solution for use in a set of dilapidated buildings in the proposed New Kensington Innovation Corridor. The deliverable will include a proof of concept (physical and/ or digital model) as well as a Technical Report on the feasible and viable options for enhancing roofing systems' contribution to the buildings’ optimal use of materials, energy and water.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Innovation Park The coolBlue Function Rig Moore, Jason X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The project will result in product renderings, engineering drawings and specifications for fabrication, potential fabrication vendors, and timelines with associated cost estimates for the completed product.

Innovation Park is home to over 60 organizations and companies, employing over 2,000 people. Throughout 3 seasons of the year, there are dozens of opportunities for entities to conduct an outdoor event requiring a portable covered trailer, temporary seating, and on-board trailer power. The "coolBlue Function Rig" portability is necessary to locate the amenity adjacent to the client entity's specific location in the Park. It's anticipated the Function Rig will be towed, remain hitched to a fully restored antique tow tractor, and the trailer stabilized for use during the event.

The antique tractor for towing can be identified and purchased fully restored from known sources. Although the trailer portion of the "rig" can originate from a commonly manufactured dual axle equipment trailer, the modifications necessary to provide maximum functionality will need designed and specified for local / regional fabrication.

Depending upon the final design, the Function Rig may be used for Ag Progress Days, homecoming parades, and other appropriate venues in addition to its primary Park use.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Kerchinski Razor Blade cutting force test Moore, Jason X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

The goal of this project is to develop the fixturing and methodology to measure the forces associated with plunging a razor blade (Bent or Welded 2-piece) into a media. In the past, a plunge test was one that that was easily accomplished as the previous generation shaving cartridge contained “flat” blades. The blades could be easily removed from the cartridge and testing using conventional devices and media. Modern shaving systems use either bent blades or multi-piece welded blade assemblies that make it impossible to utilize previous generation devices and media. The reason is that the current cut force testers use a media that is thick enough that either the bend radius of the bent blades or the support structure of the welded blade assembly comes in contact with the media, therefore rendering the force reading irrelevant. A thinner media would be needed as well as ultimately rigid fixturing to be used to hold the modern blade designs in the cut force device. The reason why this test is important is to be able to test blade edges after bending/welding or evaluate competitors’ products. See the attached images of a bent blade, welded blade assembly and a flat blade. The deliverable would be a fixture to hold Welded Blade assemblies and a fixture to hold bent blades along with a validated protocol that demonstrates the system is accurately characterizing the blade edge.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Larson Transportation Institute All Electric Supersport Motorcycle Battery System Neal, Gary X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

PSU e-Sportbike Project Proposal
High-Voltage Battery Build and Vehicle Integration - Fall 2017
E-Sportbike is a Penn State research group dedicated to the development and application of advanced motorcycle technologies. Housed within Penn State’s Larson Transportation Institute at University Park, PA and supported by faculty advisor, Timothy Cleary, the team is currently working to convert a 2015 BMW 1000RR (motorcycle) with a 1 liter 190 HP engine to an all-electric vehicle while maintaining original performance and eliminating the use of fossil fuels. To achieve this goal some technical sacrifices must be made, such as vehicle range, but because of new operating conditions and vehicle behaviors, other aspects must also improve, such as safety.
This project proposal includes finalizing the existing battery system’s mechanical design then moving to fabrication, assembly, and integration into the motorcycle. During this work the battery system will require some testing and cell balancing in the team’s high-voltage battery lab. The final deliverable is to provide a battery system that is capable of supporting the integrated electric motor in a test drive on our closed course test track.
This program also has ongoing projects that must be considered because of system interfacing as well as asset availability and work area scheduling.
The project vehicle will be used exclusively for testing and racing on closed-course tracks in sponsored events and will only be driven by a professional racer. The primary goal of this project is to provide an electric drivetrain to support maximum possible vehicle performance. This proposal is intended to establish course credit for students interested in this program and project.
Scope:
Review existing battery system design and prepare for a critical design review. Make plans and execute fabrication of necessary parts while also preparing cells and battery management system for integration. This includes cycling and balancing the lithium-ion cells in their current battery pack then disassembling that larger system in our high-voltage lab to collect the parts necessary for the new design. Bring together the fabricated mechanical parts, cells, battery management system, and other necessary electrical components in to a single system that is ready for integration. Preform final testing in the lab then integrate into our 2015 BMW S1000RR chassis. Upon successful integration the motorcycle will be capable of driving under its own power.
Anticipated supplies:
• 2015 BMW S100RR motorcycle, service manual, limited tech. support from local BMW dealer
• 100 cell high-voltage lithium battery pack w/BMS, note our system will be about 50 cells
• High-voltage testing facility, equipment, and training
• CAN communication tools and training to monitor battery testing
• Working area and tools at the Larson Transportation Institute
• Existing battery system mechanical and electrical design documents
Deliverables:
• Finalized mechanical and electrical design documents that are approved by critical design review.
• Test plan for preparing donor pack for use in the new battery system.
• Battery assembly and vehicle integration plan
• Fabrication of all necessary parts.
• Preparation of the donor battery system
• Assembly of battery system
• Testing pre vehicle integration
• Vehicle integration
• All members are expected to use the teams Slack and BOX sites to communicate and document their work

Links:
Website: http://esportbike.avt.psu.edu
SharePoint site: https://coesp.ncts.psu.edu/e-sportbike
Slack page: https://psuesportbike.slack.com
Box site: https://psu.box.com/s/2olktzynfmzl5ybzml9nvmj7sykb8az6
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Learning Factory To be determined X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

To be determined.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Made By Design Lab 1 Design of a Mobile “Maker Cart” to Support Early-Stage Engineering Education Catanach, Wallace X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Institutions (K-12, community colleges, and university) are increasingly investing in student access to AM, from single desktop-scale systems in a classroom to large dedicated AM spaces such as MakerBot Innovation Centers. Reviews show that, overwhelmingly, spaces are often located in a fixed, centralized location, such as a library or even through so-called “3D printing vending machines.” However, the majority of approaches inherently limit learning to a single location and thus a single context. This may in turn limit the potential for learning due to the strong interconnect between knowledge formation and the social, cultural and physical contexts in which it was performed. As such, this Senior Capstone Project is focused on the creation of a portable “Maker Cart,” aimed at supporting early-stage engineering education, as an alternative to these existing forms of access. The portability of the system will make it capable of both formal and informal learning contexts and will allow students to directly observe and reflect on the manufacturability of their designs. Similar carts have been steadily growing in popularity among libraries and K-12 institutions across the nation; however, they are often limited to spectacle, without curriculum to support their use and properly act as a catalyst for learning.

For this project, the student team will be tasked with designing, programming, manufacturing, implementing, and evaluating a 3D printing-oriented “Maker Cart” system. The system must be designed in such a way that it offers hands-on experience with 3D printing design and manufacturing, while simultaneously ensuring safety and ease-of-operation. Success will be determined based on the i) how easy it is for novices to properly use the system while still ensuring safety, ii) the cart’s ability to integrate at least two printers and one computer, and iii) the mobility and flexibility of the overall system to be used in a variety of educational contexts. Additionally, it is desired that the team will strive to incorporate additional features typically seen in 3D printing vending machine systems (ejection mechanisms, collection bins, streamlined interfaces, etc.).

This project is sponsored by the Made By Design Lab, a Penn State research group focused on the intersection of design and additive manufacturing. The lab is directed by Dr. Nick Meisel, Assistant Professor of Engineering Design and Mechanical Engineering.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Made By Design Lab 2 Design and Creation of a Virtual Reality Station for Passive Observation of Additive Manufacturing Technology Verbanec, Alan X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The field of additive manufacturing (AM) is estimated to grow to a worldwide revenue of more than $21 billion by the year 2020, making it an important part of the United States’ future global manufacturing competitiveness. However, current industry demands for a skilled AM workforce are not being met. As a result, more universities are beginning to offer access to AM curriculum in an attempt to educate the nascent AM workforce, which includes online programs such as Penn State’s new Master’s Degree in Additive Manufacturing and Design to be offered in Fall 2017. However, no institution has yet an efficient, educationally rigorous approach to educating online students at scale in the use of complex AM systems, which due to cost and infrastructure demands, are often constrained to a single physical location. To address this gap, Penn State researchers are investigating methods that allow online students to interact with AM technology in virtual reality (VR), which can enable students from across the globe to observe the complex workings of AM.

This Senior Capstone project is focused on the design and creation of a VR station to support real-time observation of a physical AM system. The creation of this station will assist Penn State researchers in determining students’ ability to gain working knowledge of 3D Printing technology in a VR environment. The station will need to include i) multiple Red Green Blue-Depth (RGB-D) sensing systems, such as a Microsoft Kinect, capable of capturing real time data pertaining to an additive manufacturing process, ii) a stable network for real time data transmission, and iii) connection to a geographically distant VR system that can render the streaming data in real time, with minimal latency. Initial research has already been performed to support the feasibility of this approach, but a team is needed to help create an efficient VR observation set-up to work with a 3D printer.

The student team on this project will be guided by members from Penn State’s Made By Design Lab and Penn State’s DATA Lab. Funding for this project has been made possible through a research grant from the Penn State Center for Online Innovation in Learning (COIL).
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU MATSE Assessment of Natural Building Materials for Low-Cost, Sustainable Housing in West Africa Kimel, Allen X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

There is a critical safe housing shortage in west Africa. Addressing this shortage requires maximizing local resources in order for solutions to be sustainable. In collaboration with 2iE University in Burkina Faso, four naturally occurring building materials are being explored as possible materials solutions for housing construction. Characterization, with respect to solar and thermal performance, of these materials is needed to ensure proper energy and thermal performance. The team will need to develop methods for measuring solar and thermal radiation interactions of these naturally occurring building materials. some of these measurements may require the fabrication of instrumentation. A successful project will result in reproducible measurement methods of solar and thermal radiation interactions, thus allowing for a quantitative assessment of the benefits and drawbacks of selected building materials.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Medina Lab Development of a Microscope-Compatible Acoustofluidic Device Hayes, Daniel X X X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

This project seeks to develop a fluidic system to directly visualize the dynamics of ultrasound-sensitive particles in an acoustic field using an optical microscope. The device should consist of a transparent material into which a solution of particles can be loaded. The device should be capable of being sealed and withstand sonication by an ultrasound-probe provided in lab. This device should be compatible with an optical microscope stage so that particles can be visualized before and after ultrasound sonication. Initial parameters will be provided to the students, and their may be strong potential for 3D printed designs if students are interested. PI will be directly involved in project development and available to address questions/concerns.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU MNE 1 Pulling Water from Thin Air: Manufacture of Bioinspired Water Harvesting Condensers Manogharan, Guha X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Overview: Providing access to clean water is listed as one of the grand challenges for engineering in the 21st century by the US National Academy of Engineering. One of the key issues is the uneven distribution of clean water supply around the globe, particularly in remote regions. To resolve this issue, the proposed project team will be working closely with the researchers at the Laboratory for Nature Inspired Engineering at Penn State to manufacture a portable, low-cost and energy efficient water harvesting machine to collect clean, desalinized water from thin air.

Deliverables: The team will manufacture a number of water harvesting condensers using the slippery rough surface technology developed in the Laboratory for Nature Inspired Engineering. Working with the researchers at the Laboratory, the team will manufacture the water harvesting condensers, and quantify the water-collection and energy efficiency of the machine at realistic environmental settings.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU MNE 2 Human chest expansion simulator Sommer, Joe X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The goal of this project is to design and build a system that simulates the expansion of the human chest during breathing. This chest simulator will aid in the design of wearable devices, such as the wearable chest energy harvesters shown in the figures. The students will be required to:
1. Measure chest displacement due to breathing during low, medium, and high activity levels (such as resting, walking, and running). If possible, also measure chest expansion force.
2. Select the best actuation method for chest expansion, keeping in mind the maximum frequencies needed, the scale of the displacements required, and the ease of actuation.
3. Implement the actuator into a housing that is similar to the chest, such as a manakin torso.
4. Design the outer part of the artificial chest such that it is able to compress like human soft tissue (i.e. skin + fat + muscle).
5. Design the ability to adjust the soft tissue compression characteristics to mimic different body types.
6. Use the measured chest expansion profiles in step 1 to generate continuous, repeatable signals of breathing to control the chest simulator.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU RERC on AAC 1 Software for Assessing Scanning Performance with Single Switch Technology Verbanec, Alan X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

People with physical disabilities sometimes need a computer access method other than a traditional keyboard. Scanning with a single switch (see example at http://www.bltt.org/switch/ani_sss.htm ) enables operation of computer technology and communication devices, but also provides significant cognitive challenges for the user (Ratcliff, 1994).

We need effective methods to assess the performance of individuals in learning to scan, however these methods must assess skills at a variety of levels so that they are sensitive to change as individuals acquire new skills. While there is software such as scanning wizard (https://scanningwizard.com) to support assessment of scanning, there may be benefits to assessment approaches that allow for a higher level of individualization (e.g., decreasing difficulty of the scanning task, using personally relevant images).

The goal for this team is to develop scanning assessment software that would enable communication specialists to assess scanning using familiar visual images, and provide the ability to easily adjust the difficulty of the task. For example, the scanning array would contain an image of a puzzle piece, as well as two “foils” (“empty locations”). As the individual uses scanning to select the puzzle pieces, the puzzle is assembled for the individual. Also, there would be the ability to gradually scaffold the challenge of the scanning task. For example, at first, the individual would have the opportunity to select the target with only 2 foils present, but after 2 correct selections in a row, the individual would select the target from an array with 3 foils.
The software should also collect data on the switch access timing of the participant, relative to the scanning rate and present it in an easily viewable manner.
 This team will work in coordination with Tom Jakobs (www.invotek.org).

Light, J. (1993). Teaching automatic linear scanning for computer access: A case study of a preschooler with severe physical and communication disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 12(2), 125-134.

McCarthy, J., McCarthy, J., Light, J., Drager, K., McNaughton, D., Grodzicki, L., ... & Parkin, E. (2006). Re-designing scanning to reduce learning demands: The performance of typically developing 2-year-olds. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 22, 269-283.

Ratcliff, A. (1994). Comparison of relative demands implicated in direct selection and scanning: Considerations from normal children. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 10, 67-74.

It is expected that students will developing a working prototype that advances our understanding of engineering solutions to the challenge of making AAC easier to learn and use. Students will also be expected to submit their finished work to the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Student Design Competition (more information at http://aac-rerc.psu.edu/wordpressmu/RESNA-SDC/ ).
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU RERC on AAC 2 Technology Supports for Learning to Scan with Single Switch Technology Verbanec, Alan X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems can provide powerful communication tools for persons with physical disabilities who experience difficulty in using speech. Sometimes persons who use AAC need an access method other than a traditional keyboard. Scanning with a single switch (see example at http://www.bltt.org/switch/ani_sss.htm) enables operation of communication devices, but also provides significant cognitive challenges to children (Ratcliff, 1994). These challenges could be addressed through a systematic approach to teaching scanning technology (Light, 1993; McCarthy et al, 2006).

The goal for this team is to develop scanning software on tablet technology that would enable communication specialists and family members to teach scanning using familiar visual images and desired tablet-based activities. For example, the scanning array would contain an image of a puzzle piece, as well as two “foils” (“empty locations”). As the individual uses scanning to select the puzzle pieces, the puzzle is assembled for the individual. Ideally the puzzle would be created from an image uploaded by the family of the individual. Also, there would be the ability to gradually scaffold the challenge of the scanning task. For example, at first the cursor would stop at the target location, and give the user an opportunity to hit the switch (and make the selection). Once this skill has been mastered, the cursor would operate at a slow rate of speed, giving support for a successful response. Finally, as the learner gains competence, the scanning feature would operate at a faster rate so that the user is prepared to use scanning with a variety of devices. This team will work in coordination with Tom Jakobs (www.invotek.org).

Light, J. (1993). Teaching automatic linear scanning for computer access: A case study of a preschooler with severe physical and communication disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 12, 125-134.

McCarthy, J., McCarthy, J., Light, J., Drager, K., McNaughton, D., Grodzicki, L., ... & Parkin, E. (2006). Re-designing scanning to reduce learning demands: The performance of typically developing 2-year-olds. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 22, 269-283.

Ratcliff, A. (1994). Comparison of relative demands implicated in direct selection and scanning: Considerations from normal children. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 10, 67-74.

It is expected that students will developing a working prototype that advances our understanding of engineering solutions to the challenge of making AAC easier to learn and use. Students will also be expected to submit their finished work to the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Student Design Competition (more information at http://aac-rerc.psu.edu/wordpressmu/RESNA-SDC/ ).
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU RERC on AAC 3 Presenting Video Visual Scene Display (Video VSD) software on small Android tablets/Smartphones Verbanec, Alan X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Video Visual Scene Displays (Video VSDs) have been demonstrated to be a powerful method for supporting communication for persons with developmental disabilities and complex communication needs (see https://rerc-aac.psu.edu/development/d2-developing-aac-technology-to-support-interactive-video-visual-scene-displays/ ). Video VSDs are created using software that support creation of (a) videos of meaningful events within the individual’s life with (b) relevant language concepts embedded as hotspots within the scene. The software also organizes Video VSDs using two scrollable navigation bars, making it easy to switch among video VSDs when communicating. To date, this communication software has been developed for use on large (10”) Android tablets. The goal for this team is to create a new navigation scheme that is practical for use on smaller tablets and Android smartphones. The design challenge is to create a user interface that presents the video VSDs as thumbnails that are large enough to make them easily distinguishable, but that do not interfere with communication when using a video VSD on a smaller devices.

This team will work in collaboration with Erik Jakobs of InvoTek (https://www.invotek.org/), the developer of the present Video VSD app.

It is expected that students will develop a working prototype that advances our understanding of engineering solutions to the challenge of making AAC easier to learn and use. Students will also be expected to submit their finished work to the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Student Design Competition (more information at http://aac-rerc.psu.edu/wordpressmu/RESNA-SDC/ )
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU School of Theatre Theatrical Special Effects and Automation Control System Wheeler, Timothy X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Overview: The School of Theatre is looking to expand its theatrical automation and special effects capabilities with a new updated Control system. In keeping with entertainment industry standard for automation control we would like to develop a control system using Beckhoff Industrial Controls. The beckhoff family of products provides all of the necessary components to run any type of effect required on stage. This system would be able to support multiple "axis's" of automation along with a user interface which allows the operator to adjust settings in real-time.

Deliverables:
A beckhoff based control system capable of controlling 4 fully automated mechanical winches including closed loop feedback and safety sensors.

A customizable user interface that an operator can use to adjust settings on the fly and write "cues" to move the winches to specific positions at specific times in a repeatable fashion.

A functioning life safety system that supports multiple e-stops and safety sensors and conforms to at least a sil 2 rating

Must adhere to all industrial controls standards in accordance with NFPA 79 and UL508
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PSU Wind Energy Club Wind Turbine for Outreach and Education Purposes Neal, Gary X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Penn State’s Wind Energy Club is motivated to inspire secondary school students to pursue STEM and renewable energy careers while also teaching them about the energy that is present in their own backyards and being renewed on a daily basis. To this end, they desire an interactive, portable wind turbine to encourage K-12 school students to learn more about wind energy while also exploring novel science, engineering and math concepts. The club has already begun the process of designing turbine components and a visual display for hands on activities, but they are looking for a senior capstone team who is motivated to bring the project to fruition. This project will involve completing the wind turbine design, construction/purchasing of the remaining parts, and if there is time, testing the completed machine and display, while documenting the design and construction process. Assistance will be provided to the team by Wind Energy Club advisors as well as veteran team members. A mix of backgrounds are likely necessary to complete the required tasks including electrical engineering and mechanical engineering, in particular. Experience with Labview is also a plus for the visual display interface.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
PTC Inc. ThingWorx and the Internet of Things Verbanec, Alan X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

ThingWorx is the first software platform designed to build and run the applications of the connected world. ThingWorx reduces the time, cost, and risk required to build innovative Machine-to-Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) applications. As the leading IoT platform it is very important for us as a company to continue to find new and innovative ways to use the Internet of Things to solve real world problems.

For this new ThingWorx Learning Factory project we are looking for a group of creative and innovative Computer Science and Engineering students to find an idea and then execute a project that will utilize a variety of different types of IoT devices including smart phones, sensors, etc. and the ThingWorx platform to create a working proof-of-concept IoT solution by the end of the semester.

Our project this semester is purposefully open-ended as we are looking for students who will bring new ideas to the table that they will be excited about and driven to deliver.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Quaker Chemical Corporation Machining of Compacted Graphite Iron Cannon, David X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Compacted graphite iron (CGI) continues to gain use within the automotive and heavy equipment industries. The higher strength properties of CGI, compared to those of gray iron, enables for the manufacture of engines with higher pressure operating combustion chambers, yielding more efficient engines with reduced emissions levels. In addition, the use of CGI enables the production of thinner walled parts, generating lighter engines, and a subsequent further increase in fuel efficiency. Current limitations associated with the use of CGI lie in its lower machinability properties relative to gray iron, with subsequent higher tool wear rates. This poor machinability is due largely to the lack of MnS2 inclusions in the metal itself, which with other ferrous metals such as gray iron, provides significant lubricating properties during machining. To compensate for the absence of MnS2 in CGI, greater lubrication properties is required from the machining fluid used. This project will investigate the effectiveness of two new metalworking fluids in reducing friction and tool wear in high speed continuous cutting of CGI.
Project Objectives and Deliverables:
A. The performance of three different metalworking fluid compositions will be studied with regard to tool wear rates obtained in the high speed, continuous cutting of Grade 450 CGI. Specific Objectives 1. Using three separate fluid compositions, conduct high speed turning operations on CGI cylinders using carbide Inserts 2. Measure tool wear rates for the three fluids tested 3. Report results and provide conclusions regarding the relative performance of the three fluid compositions in the turning operation performed.
B. Study the effects of machined surface microstructure and hardness, as cutting insert wear progresses Specific Objectives 1. Using one of the three fluids selected, measure Vickers hardness of machined surfaces as a function of insert wear 2. For the same machined surfaces, conduct SEM analyses of prepared cross-sectional pieces to investigate the microstructural features of the machined surfaces. 3. Report results and provide conclusions regarding the impact of insert wear on machined surface hardness and microstructure.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
SEKISUI-SPI 1 Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) Web Inspection System - Team 1 Verbanec, Alan X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Fully open-sourced vision detection system.
-Linux based operating system with python programming
-Nvidia based GPU hardware for GPU computation capabilities.

Machine vision cameras with a Python compatible SDK/API.
-Does not need a GUI or operator interface, can operate from script or command line.
-Utilize traditional machine vision hardware (line/area scan cameras (GigE), frame grabbers, lighting, etc).

Utilize Google TensorFlow python library
-Ability to retrain CNN models as new products are commercialized.

System output will be to a local relational database (MySQL, MS SQL, etc).
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
SEKISUI-SPI 2 Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) Web Inspection System - Team 2 Wheeler, Timothy X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Fully open-sourced vision detection system.
-Linux based operating system with python programming
-Nvidia based GPU hardware for GPU computation capabilities.

Machine vision cameras with a Python compatible SDK/API.
-Does not need a GUI or operator interface, can operate from script or command line.
-Utilize traditional machine vision hardware (line/area scan cameras (GigE), frame grabbers, lighting, etc).

Utilize Google TensorFlow python library
-Ability to retrain CNN models as new products are commercialized.

System output will be to a local relational database (MySQL, MS SQL, etc).
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Shell 1 - Prototype Shell EcoMarathon Prototype- Team 1 Neal, Gary X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

For over 30 years, Shell Eco-Marathon competitions have challenged future automotive engineers and scientists to push the limits of energy efficiency and innovate solutions to the world’s mobility challenges. Now, more than 1,000 high school and college students from across the Americas will head to California to see who can design and build ultra-energy efficient vehicles and go the furthest using the least amount of energy in Shell Eco-marathon Americas 2018. Penn State students in this project will have the opportunity to travel to California and participate in he 12th annual competition, in April 2018. More information on this year's Eco-marathon can be found on the website: http://www.shell.com/energy-and-innovation/shell-ecomarathon/americas.html Penn State traditionally enters two cars into the competition. The Urban Concept Car is currently constructed with a compressed natural gas (CNG) engine. This semester's team will be expected to convert the engine into a gasoline engine using Ecotrons conversion kit. This will require a new fuel system design. Electrical engineering design will be needed for redesign of the wiring harness. The Prototype Car is currently constructed with a battery electric propulsion.. This semester’s team will be challenged with redesigning the steering/alignment of the vehicle and reviewing the body design for fuel efficiency improvements. Electrical engineering is needed to design, build, and test a motor controller for the battery to motor drive-train. A video of last year's Penn State team can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZA1C0A-7nVs
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Shell 2 - Urban Shell EcoMarathon Urban - Team 2 Neal, Gary X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

For over 30 years, Shell Eco-Marathon competitions have challenged future automotive engineers and scientists to push the limits of energy efficiency and innovate solutions to the world’s mobility challenges. Now, more than 1,000 high school and college students from across the Americas will head to California to see who can design and build ultra-energy efficient vehicles and go the furthest using the least amount of energy in Shell Eco-marathon Americas 2018. Penn State students in this project will have the opportunity to travel to California and participate in he 12th annual competition, in April 2018. More information on this year's Eco-marathon can be found on the website: http://www.shell.com/energy-and-innovation/shell-ecomarathon/americas.html Penn State traditionally enters two cars into the competition. The Urban Concept Car is currently constructed with a compressed natural gas (CNG) engine. This semester's team will be expected to convert the engine into a gasoline engine using Ecotrons conversion kit. This will require a new fuel system design. Electrical engineering design will be needed for redesign of the wiring harness. The Prototype Car is currently constructed with a battery electric propulsion.. This semester’s team will be challenged with redesigning the steering/alignment of the vehicle and reviewing the body design for fuel efficiency improvements. Electrical engineering is needed to design, build, and test a motor controller for the battery to motor drive-train. A video of last year's Penn State team can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZA1C0A-7nVs
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Siemens Industry Inc. Design of Next Generation Portable ultrasonic Meter for Siemens Industry Purdum, Charlie X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

This project will task the students with redesigning a Siemens Portable Ultrasonic Clamp-On meter to incorporate the new technology. During this project the students will be tasked with:
• Designing/choosing an enclosure to house the electronics
• Conduct energy calculations to select an appropriate power supply
• Analyze specifications to ensure area classification compliance
• Conduct heat calculations of the enclosure
• Provide justification for manufacturability of the design.
• Provide a 3D model of the new Portable design for final review.
Siemens will provide the students with drawings of a previous generations of portable meters as well as the drawings for the new FCT meter for reference. Siemens will also be providing a sample of the ultrasonic meter.Please be advised that this design is for an end product and it is expected that it is capable of being manufactured. Students may also be expected to conduct cost analysis and justifications for material/ design justification.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Sikorsky, A Lockheed Martin Company Sikorsky VTOL UAV for Military Applications Sommer, Joe X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Vertical Takeoff & Landing (VTOL) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are important assets for military operators, first responders and government agencies. However, small VTOL UAVs such as quadcopters often lack the reliability and durability required for use in hostile environments.

The objective of this project is to develop a militarized VTOL UAV capable of advanced mission operations in harsh environments, while reducing operator workload through advanced flight controls. The VTOL UAV should be capable of performing missions such as loitering in designated areas and providing aerial feedback to the user or payload delivery.

Students should focus on designing and implementing robust structural components for a custom airframe design. The new airframe should be durable, impact resistant and should not use prefabricated components. Provisions should be included for a 2 lbs. usable payload. Use of Additive manufacturing and traditional VTOL UAV configurations are encouraged.

Electrical integration should focus on selection of the necessary components (motors, ESC, etc) for VTOL UAV. Students should utilize commercially available hardware, software, and firmware (ArduPilot) to expand the capabilities of the VTOL UAV. Design emphasis should be around remote sensing, surveillance, and reducing operator workload. Improvements to overall aircraft handling should permit UAV operation with minimal training. Testing and tuning will be necessary to effective develop the VTOL UAV.

The goal of the project is to demonstrate a systems level approach to integrating the necessary structural and electrical components to create fully functional, advanced VTOL UAV. Students will be challenged to balance performance, efficiency, cost, weight, and feasibility to achieve the best possible design. Deliverables include architecture diagram, bill of material, design report, flight envelope definition, and flight demonstrations. During final demonstrations, all team members must show their ability to operate the UAV.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
The Boeing Company 1 Boeing Mars Rover - Team 1 - GLOBAL PROJECT with Belgium Campus Erdman, Michael X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Boeing will challenge two teams composed of Mechanical, Electrical, and Computer Engineers to work together to design, build, test, and demonstrate a vehicle designed to explore Mars.

As the world is embracing the idea of inhabiting Mars, there is opportunity to use existing space technology to transport rovers to the surface of Mars to gather information. It is the students’ mission to create a vehicle that can navigate a planet where GPS cannot be used, traverse unusual terrain, and gather information vital to researching the likelihood of survival on Mars.

Two teams of students will work collaboratively to design and build a vehicle that can handle Mars-like terrain: being uneven, shifting surfaces with minimal grades. The vehicle will need to visually identify and collect samples. In addition, the rover will be piloted remotely with First Person View (FPV) cameras, simulating an actual rover on Mars.

The first team, composed of mechanical engineers, will be responsible for the structural components including the chassis, drive system, sample collection system, and any structure required to support the system components. The second team, composed of electrical and computer science engineers, will be responsible for the system. This includes the drive control, FPV camera feed, user interface for the pilot, and any sensors necessary to complete the mission. The teams must work together to ensure design continuity and successful integration.

The goal of this project is to combine the designed structural components (chassis, wheels/treads, rock pick-up, etc.) with the necessary electronic components (motors, cameras, battery, transmitter, etc.) resulting in a fully-functional Mars rover that can handle shifting terrain, collect samples, and be piloted with FPV cameras and sensors. The teams will demonstrate their vehicle at the end of the semester, on the day of the Learning Factory Showcase.

The two teams must be enrolled in the same course time and will preferably have the same instructor.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
The Boeing Company 2 Boeing Mars Rover - Team 2 - GLOBAL PROJECT with Belgium Campus Erdman, Michael X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

Boeing will challenge two teams composed of Mechanical, Electrical, and Computer Engineers to work together to design, build, test, and demonstrate a vehicle designed to explore Mars.

As the world is embracing the idea of inhabiting Mars, there is opportunity to use existing space technology to transport rovers to the surface of Mars to gather information. It is the students’ mission to create a vehicle that can navigate a planet where GPS cannot be used, traverse unusual terrain, and gather information vital to researching the likelihood of survival on Mars.

Two teams of students will work collaboratively to design and build a vehicle that can handle Mars-like terrain: being uneven, shifting surfaces with minimal grades. The vehicle will need to visually identify and collect samples. In addition, the rover will be piloted remotely with First Person View (FPV) cameras, simulating an actual rover on Mars.

The first team, composed of mechanical engineers, will be responsible for the structural components including the chassis, drive system, sample collection system, and any structure required to support the system components. The second team, composed of electrical and computer science engineers, will be responsible for the system. This includes the drive control, FPV camera feed, user interface for the pilot, and any sensors necessary to complete the mission. The teams must work together to ensure design continuity and successful integration.

The goal of this project is to combine the designed structural components (chassis, wheels/treads, rock pick-up, etc.) with the necessary electronic components (motors, cameras, battery, transmitter, etc.) resulting in a fully-functional Mars rover that can handle shifting terrain, collect samples, and be piloted with FPV cameras and sensors. The teams will demonstrate their vehicle at the end of the semester, on the day of the Learning Factory Showcase.

The two teams must be enrolled in the same course time and will preferably have the same instructor.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
The Innovation Machine, Inc. "The Miller" Digital Machining Mobile Cart Simpson, Timothy X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

Digital Machining Mobile Cart Hardware & Software

Problem:
The current ‘setup’ carts that are used for CNC machining are ill-suited for today’s digital manufacturing capabilities. With the onslaught of new ‘industry 4.0’ hardware and software products introduced to the marketplace, a solution is needed to display, store, and provide easy access to these new technologies.
Additionally, many manufacturers do not realize how much these new technologies can help them improve their CNC machining operation. A quick, easy, and affordable solution that is measurable, repeatable and scalable must be created to allow thousands of manufacturers to participate in the next digital industrial revolution.

Solution:
The hardware solution of the Digital Machining Mobile Cart will be configured with multiple options. The cart should be designed with modular component options that can be added for each user’s needs. Cart features will include items such as monitors, computers, castors, video cameras, and a multitude of specialized equipment needed for CNC Machining. The design program will automatically create the Bill of Materials (BOM) and associated costs.
Hardware Project Deliverables include:
1) Review of work processes that can be performed with the Digital Machining Mobile Cart
2) Review of hardware and software resources needed for each work process
3) Modular CAD design of cart including GD&T, BOM, and estimated make or buy costs.
4) A fabricated physical prototype of the cart.

A software solution that analyzes a current CNC machining operation with a limited number of data inputs will be developed. The software will help the user visualize their current CNC machining process and automatically calculate the ‘improvement potential’ of a machining operation. The software solution will be accessible on the Digital Machining Mobile Cart and results displayed in a ‘CNC Machining Dashboard’.
Software Project Deliverables include:
1) CAM program software analysis application
2) CNC Machining Process Visualization
3) CAM program “improvement potential” calculation
4) CNC Machining Dashboard
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
USA Canoe and Kayak Team - Officials Committee USA Canoe/Kayak Slalom Committee – Maintaining Officials’ Information Purdum, Charlie X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: NO

The USA Canoe/Kayak (USACK) Slalom Committee is responsible for maintaining a database of technical officials who are certified internationally (International Technical Official or ITO) and nationally (National Technical Official or NTO). These databases are used to generate multiple solicitations for officials to work various slalom races, and used to verify they have met certain criteria in order to request the renewal of their certifications.

Over the past twenty years the ITO and NTO databases have been maintained manually by one or two people using simple spreadsheets. This process has proven very labor intensive to maintain. The vision is to upgrade the databases from spreadsheets to a relational database, provide a modern Graphical User Interface (GUI) that would allow the officials themselves to update their information, and support approval of information by senior officials. Further, the database would maintain a list of race experiences and qualifications for each of the officials.

If time permits, we also request a smartphone application that would allow officials to see the upcoming races, select races to volunteer for, and exchange messages within the group. The officials should also be able to use this smartphone application to indicate when they volunteered for a race, and senior officials need to approve this information.

For all applications data integrity and security must be maintained. Various levels of data security must be accounted for via user logins. The interfaces and applications should be targeted for the widest possible set of technical platforms.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Volvo Construction Equipment Development of a scale compactor model for experimental verification of directional drum vibration control Campbell, Rob X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: YES

The present project aims at designing and building a reduced scale compactor model to experimentally investigate the acoustic radiation pattern resulting from the drum vibration, and verify the predicted sound reduction using directional vibration control. A typical asphalt compactor with double drums is shown in Fig. 1. The reduced scale model to be used for this project, is shown in Fig. 2. It basically consists of a drum assembly with an eccentric inside, a testing rig supporting the drum assembly, 2 sets of isolators connecting the drum and the rig, and an electric motor driving the drum eccentric. The reduced scale double drums will be driven by electric motors to vibrate at specified directions and relative phase angles, shown in Fig. 3.

Tasks
1. Review VOLVO compactor design and understand drum vibration mechanisms.
2. Design a reduced scale model that can be used to simulate the drum vibration.
3. Fabricate the parts (3D printing is recommended) and assemble them together.
4. Develop a control algorithm to synchronize two electric motors spinning at specified directions and relative phase angles.
5. Instrument the scale model and perform acoustic measurements (sound pressure and sound power) to investigate sound radiation pattern and validate simulation results.
6. Report the results and learnings.
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Volvo Construction Equipment North America, LLC Ultrasonic Drum and Screed for Road Construction: Phase 2 Campbell, Rob X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: NO

Intellectual Property: YES

Background

This will be Phase 2 for the project of this title. Phase 1 was completed as a Capstone project in Spring 2017. The test fixture and results from the first phase are available at the start of this second phase.

Fresh, hot asphalt is sticky. That can cause problems during the road paving process. The hot asphalt can stick to the equipment being used to make the road, thus degrading the road as it is being built. In particular, there are two pieces of construction equipment that are in direct contact with the asphalt and are affected by this problem; the asphalt paver and the asphalt compactor.

The asphalt paver comes first, and deposits the hot asphalt onto the road surface to be paved. The rear of the asphalt paver is called the ”screed.” The bottom of the screed is a metal plate that is in direct contact with the hot asphalt. The screed is used to control the thickness, contour, and smoothness of the asphalt. The screed is the predominantly black structure on the right hand side of the photo.

The asphalt compactor follows the paver, and is used to increase the density of the hot asphalt, thus improving its load bearing capability and longevity. The asphalt compactor typically has two similar steel drums which are in direct contact with the hot asphalt. They perform the compaction due to both static and dynamic forces. The static force comes simply from the weight of the machine, and the dynamic force comes from the vibration of the drums. (The details of how the drums vibrate, which is in the 30 Hz to 70 Hz range, can be explained at a later time.)

Current Solutions to the Problem

For the paver screed, the solution that is used by all pavers is to heat the bottom of the screed to approximately the same temperature as the hot asphalt, about 300 degrees F. This heating is done either with diesel burners or with electric resistance heaters. These solutions require either a burner system or an electric generator with the associated heaters.

For the compactor drums, the only solution used by all is to keep the drum wet with water. This solution requires the machine to have water tanks, a water distribution system, and a supply of water.

Ultrasonic Idea

If the paver screed and the compactor outer shells of the compactor drums could be made to vibrate ultrasonically, this might prohibit the hot asphalt from sticking. (This idea is similar to the use of ultrasonic vibration to clean jewelry.) Then the heaters, associated fuel use, water systems, etc. will not be needed. The end customer would experience improved Productivity, Reliability, Fuel Economy, and more Simplified Operation of their compactors and pavers.

Project Scope: Phase 2

Phase 1 demonstrated that ultrasonic vibration does reduce the amount of ”asphalt” that sticks. Phase 2 will expand the capability of the test fixture and investigate the effect of the significant variables.

• Modify the test fixture so that hot mix asphalt at 300 degrees F can be tested. This would be the major deliverable, and probably require the most design work and creativity. (Phase 1 testing was done at room temperature with simulated hot mix asphalt).
• Modify the test fixture (or create a new one) to test the effect compactor drums. (Phase 1 tested only the paver screed.)
• What frequency range and vibration amplitude would be the most effective? (Phase 1 tested only one frequency and amplitude.)
• Evaluate various materials and surface roughness (Phase 1 used only one material and roughness.)
• Test the baseline conditions of wet drum and heated screed. (Phase 1 tested only the unheated screed.)

This idea is already protected by a US patent.

Desired Deliverables
• Test data at 300 degrees F.
• Best frequencies and amplitudes to use
• Effect of different materials and surface roughness
• Transducer options, with pros and cons of each
• Test report
• FEA (if done)
• How much power would be needed for a full size paver or compactor
Company Name ProjecttTitle Faculty Contact BME CHE CMPEN CMPSC ED EE ESC IE MATSE ME NUCE
Volvo Group North America Cost Effective Light Weight Diesel Front Engine Mount Cannon, David X X X X X

Non-Disclosure Agreement: YES

Intellectual Property: NO

Design of a lightweight front engine mount – the current Volvo 11L front engine mount is made out of spheroidal graphite iron and weighs 20 kg. Students are tasked with redesigning the 11L front engine mount so that it has the same strength, stiffness, and function (interfaces, bracket locations…) as the current iron bracket, but at a lower weight, with 10 kg weight reduction as the goal.
Deliverables:
*Lightweight front engine mount suitable for installation & service in a truck
*Complete design documentation (prints, CAD models, materials...)
*FEA analysis report demonstrating fatigue life of 5x10^6 cycles
*Part cost analysis demonstrating cost effective weight reduction with a cost ratio guideline of $3.30 part cost increase per kg reduced on fully industrialized volumes of 10,000 pieces / year
 
 

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